From Dreamer to Owner, now what?
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 50s x2 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7173
Location: seattle/athens
Wed Nov 15, 2017 4:30 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
...
... the connection between the spark plug cap to spark plug. I assume you mean the little gold prong housdined in the rubber cap. I just shoved that on randomly. Is there more to it than that?

....

I turn off my fuel tap every single time. Thumb, key, valve
Could be something to check here. Sounds like you have the original split brass sparkplug connector which should sort of snap onto the little barrel nut you need to leave on the end of the plug. If the rubber boot is in place, your motor may run and sometimes seem to run fine because the rubber boot is randomly holding it against the sparkplug top end or close enough to get spark to the business end.

But maybe you got randomly lucky this time cuz the symptoms don't match very well. Easy to check though. Assuming the brass thingy wasn't spread open so it's too loose, a gentle tug on the cable and it either wants to stay on the plug or comes away easily. Put it together w/ the plug out and you'll get a better idea how it works and you can bend the brass thingy prongs tighter if they need it. 15 minutes, tops and you can inspect your plug as well. Take pics too.

Yep, tap OFF please, don't 'forget'! Do it right but no real need to run carb dry after every ride unless it's leaking or something. It's optional so suit yourself on that.

I was lucky no 4 A.M. and my route was for a small weekly paper so hundreds of single section light papers, but had to hit EVERY single house on foot, every Thursday afternoon after school while saving up for a bike.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Wed Nov 15, 2017 8:08 pm quote
V oodoo wrote:
I was lucky no 4 A.M. and my route was for a small weekly paper so hundreds of single section light papers, but had to hit EVERY single house on foot, every Thursday afternoon after school while saving up for a bike.
Bike? Pedal bike or scooter bike? I admire anyone who has trudged a paper route. Swore up and down I'd never let my kids get one, but I'm re-thinking that. Paper routes are daily grit-builders. Extra points if you have to endure dark snowy winters. Worst memory, getting home from senior prom at 1:00am and then hitting the paper route at 4:00am (my hair looked REALLY good that morning). Best memory, stopping at the bakery with my older brother for fresh donuts when we got done. Yum.

Good advice on the brass plug connecter. I did clip it on, but the prongs might be loose. Definitely worth checking. Thanks.
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'79 P200, '74 VBC Super, '80 100 Sport
Joined: 23 Jan 2012
Posts: 713
Location: 32° 37' 40" N, 117° 2' 53" W
Wed Nov 15, 2017 8:45 pm quote
union Tribune San diego
I threw papers at 13... union Tribune in San diego....played baseball so I launched them from across the street and most of the time "porched" them. hit screen doors on occasion and bailed quick! that was in 80 or '81 (yep..im old!) delivered first on my bike with bag and.back rack...sunday paper sucked balls! then on a vespa ciao moped at 14... (illicit stolen one as I recall) but hey that was '82.... got my first scoot at 15 from an old Italian guy in la mesa, ca...mods were just hitting it in s.d.

those were the days Lamont!
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1965 Sears Allstate, 2013 GTS 300 Super i.e.
Joined: 24 Jul 2012
Posts: 597
Location: Bay City, MI
Thu Nov 16, 2017 4:07 am quote
Yup, first job at 14, that was back in ‘76. Ride my bike to deliver the papers year round....summer and winter. Had a Schwinn Stingray with the small front tire and I would switch it to 20” fork and tire because the little tire did not go thru the deep snow very well. Wish I had that bike now....could sell it to buy an new Vespa.

Yaha Sunday papers were a bitch. Paper bag was so full it was about to explode. The bag was so heavy you were leaning on a 45 degree angle to be able to ride. Thanksgiving day papers were the worst. Couldn’t even fold them. Had to make a couple of runs back to the paper drop off point as you could only take 1/3 of the papers. We used to sneak out on on Sunday morning and go to a buddies (where anything goes at his house) to play cards and smoke cigarettes. Then we would deliver the paper at 2am and then got to an all night diner to get something to eat. It used to piss the cops off that some 14 year olds were out at that time of the morning (or night) but they could not do anything as we had a legit reason to be out. Yah grabbing Dunkin Donuts at 4am was a treat...fresh out of the oven and back when they were real donuts. Those were some fun times.

I never had kids but if I did, I would make them work. It’s good ofor them. Get used to it, you will be going it for the rest of your life. I grew up in a house of 7 kids, you worked if you wanted stuff. I have (as well as all my siblings) been employed since the paper route at 14 years old....that 40+ years for you math challenged.
Ossessionato
1979 P200e
Joined: 18 Mar 2013
Posts: 2463
Location: Lock Haven, PA
Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:53 am quote
I had a slightly different paper route... Long Island Pennysaver. It was a free local advertising rag that came out twice a week. I got my route at 11 or so, and quickly the manager (a guy named Rocky who drove a craptastic creepy old guy van) asked me if I wanted a double route. Why not???

I ran the double route for 3 weeks before I realized that it sucked! I gave it to my brother, and often we worked together, he did one side of the street while I did the other. We didn't make diddly, it was only twice a week so it wasn't too hard. I really wanted the Newsday route, but a girl up the street named Lynn had that, and it seemed like the route was in her family forever.

My sister finally got the Newsday route (afternoon paper back then). I used to take her on Saturdays to the 7-11 to pick up her Sunday inserts and pay her manager. She had the little book for payment and everything... plus she was the one who got bitten by a dog.

My daughter didn't have a paper route (adults in cars do it now at 5:30 am), but she babysat, worked for me from time to time (I run an online bookstore), worked an afterschool program, and sometimes waitressed for a catering company. She's now a Grade 1 teacher (and she didn't take last summer off after graduation, she worked at a summer nerd camp).

Working as a kid builds character, and you realize that if you don't do it, it doesn't get done. Yes, I filled in for my sister when she was sick, as I recall my Dad might have done also.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Thu Nov 16, 2017 7:20 pm quote
Great paper route stories. Reading them brought back some fun memories...Sunday and Thanksgiving papers were the absolute worst!

It's true, all the crap jobs you do as a kid teach you some good life lessons. One of which is what you DON'T want to do when you grow up.

Still very fond of the smell of a fresh newspaper.
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1965 Sears Allstate, 2013 GTS 300 Super i.e.
Joined: 24 Jul 2012
Posts: 597
Location: Bay City, MI
Fri Nov 17, 2017 4:21 am quote
Kimono32 wrote:
Great paper route stories. Reading them brought back some fun memories...Sunday and Thanksgiving papers were the absolute worst!

It's true, all the crap jobs you do as a kid teach you some good life lessons. One of which is what you DON'T want to do when you grow up.

Still very fond of the smell of a fresh newspaper.
And I bet I could fold and rubber band a paper in the blink of an eye and I have not done one in 40 years.
Ossessionato
1976 Super (x 2), 1974 Primavera (x 2), 2006 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 4866
Location: So Cal
Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:52 am quote
Kimono32 wrote:
Still very fond of the smell of a fresh newspaper.
Me too. I also delivered papers as a kid and that smell still reminds me of riding down the street with bags of folded papers hanging from the handlebars of my Sting Ray.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:11 pm quote
SoCalGuy wrote:
Kimono32 wrote:
Still very fond of the smell of a fresh newspaper.
Me too. I also delivered papers as a kid and that smell still reminds me of riding down the street with bags of folded papers hanging from the handlebars of my Sting Ray.
I figured you might be in this elite group

Just checked out a pic of a Sting Ray since I wasn't familiar with the term. What a rad bike! Oozes 70's style.

Here was my trusty steed. Not nearly as stylish as yours, especially since I had nerdy wire baskets hanging over the rear tire to hold all those papers. But how 'bout those curly handlebars?

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Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:25 pm quote
If I keep talking about paper routes and such, I'm going to have to slap a NSR label on this thread, so back to business, ahem.

I'm going to rebuild the carb this winter, so making a few plans for that. First and easiest, ordering the parts.

I found a kit on scootermercato that looks okay. It's cheap enough anyway. There was a mention of replacing the float needle, so I probably should order that too. Anything else?

I watched a you tube tutorial tonight on carb cleaning and was surprised at how small the carb actually is. Like the size of a big cheeseburger. Not so intimidating after all.

Knock on wood.

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1965 Sears Allstate, 2013 GTS 300 Super i.e.
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Posts: 597
Location: Bay City, MI
Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:41 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
SoCalGuy wrote:
Kimono32 wrote:
Still very fond of the smell of a fresh newspaper.
Me too. I also delivered papers as a kid and that smell still reminds me of riding down the street with bags of folded papers hanging from the handlebars of my Sting Ray.
I figured you might be in this elite group

Just checked out a pic of a Sting Ray since I wasn't familiar with the term. What a rad bike! Oozes 70's style.

Here was my trusty steed. Not nearly as stylish as yours, especially since I had nerdy wire baskets hanging over the rear tire to hold all those papers. But how 'bout those curly handlebars?
Sweet. Are those Campy components I spy there? Yah, go price a Stingray now. $$$$$$$. But cool bike for sure.
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Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:36 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
I found a kit on scootermercato that looks okay. It's cheap enough anyway. There was a mention of replacing the float needle, so I probably should order that too. Anything else?

I watched a you tube tutorial tonight on carb cleaning and was surprised at how small the carb actually is. Like the size of a big cheeseburger. Not so intimidating after all.
Cheeseburger for sure! That kit includes a needle and float. David and Matt are very helpful if you have questions about the kit or any of life’s big questions.
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1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T / 2009 Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 695
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:40 am quote
msprygada wrote:
Sweet. Are those Campy components I spy there? Yah, go price a Stingray now. $$$$$$$. But cool bike for sure.
My older brother had a Stingray back in the '70s. He had the 5-speed stick shift. Much like this one.



Except Scott's was red with the metal flake seat and the tall sissy bar.

LINK

They only want $1200 for this one.
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Sun Nov 19, 2017 4:59 am quote
seamus26 wrote:
msprygada wrote:
Sweet. Are those Campy components I spy there? Yah, go price a Stingray now. $$$$$$$. But cool bike for sure.
My older brother had a Stingray back in the '70s. He had the 5-speed stick shift. Much like this one.



Except Scott's was red with the metal flake seat and the tall sissy bar.

LINK

They only want $1200 for this one.
That was the model I had but only in purple ( they called it plumb crazy). Your picture is the three speed model which I had.

Then somewhere I found the front fork and wheel like below and put it on my Sting Ray. I thought it was cool because it had a drum brake on it. I remember taking a big jump on time and I landed mostly on the front wheel and I compressed the spring so much that it pushed coils inside of each other and it would not return back to normal. I was able to release the spring using a large screwdriver but it did not take much to recompress it after that so I had to buy a new spring. But like I said, we rode our bikes all year round and in the snow, this small front wheel did not go thru the snow very well.

This is the five speed model. The Grey Ghost was the holy grail of the Sting Ray models.i wonder how many guys lost their ability to have kids on those shifters. 😳

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250 Super
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Location: 93441
Sun Nov 19, 2017 8:51 am quote
Kimono32 wrote:
If I keep talking about paper routes and such, I'm going to have to slap a NSR label on this thread, so back to business, ahem.

I'm going to rebuild the carb this winter, so making a few plans for that. First and easiest, ordering the parts.

I found a kit on scootermercato that looks okay. It's cheap enough anyway. There was a mention of replacing the float needle, so I probably should order that too. Anything else?

I watched a you tube tutorial tonight on carb cleaning and was surprised at how small the carb actually is. Like the size of a big cheeseburger. Not so intimidating after all.

Knock on wood.
The carb itself is pretty easy to remove and work on. The biggest potential problem is dropping something into the engine through an open rotary valve when removing or installing the carb or while the carb is off. I rotate the engine so the valve is closed. The fuel line can be fun to get off and on as well. You also might want to get a new base gasket along with the rebuild kit.
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a pair of "ran when parked" Rallys
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Posts: 345
Location: Middletown, CT
Sun Nov 19, 2017 9:00 am quote
Here’s my Schwinn, 1954 26” Corvette with 3spd Sturmy Archer hub:

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Hooked
'74 super, '07 yellow panda
Joined: 17 Apr 2016
Posts: 144
Location: richland, wa
Sun Nov 19, 2017 9:48 am quote
classic rider wrote:
Kimono32 wrote:
If I keep talking about paper routes and such, I'm going to have to slap a NSR label on this thread, so back to business, ahem.

I'm going to rebuild the carb this winter, so making a few plans for that. First and easiest, ordering the parts.

I found a kit on scootermercato that looks okay. It's cheap enough anyway. There was a mention of replacing the float needle, so I probably should order that too. Anything else?

I watched a you tube tutorial tonight on carb cleaning and was surprised at how small the carb actually is. Like the size of a big cheeseburger. Not so intimidating after all.

Knock on wood.
The carb itself is pretty easy to remove and work on. The biggest potential problem is dropping something into the engine through an open rotary valve when removing or installing the carb or while the carb is off. I rotate the engine so the valve is closed. The fuel line can be fun to get off and on as well. You also might want to get a new base gasket along with the rebuild kit.
^^^ this is important, kimono! The part about rotating the valve closed. Do that before you take off the carb. After you take off the air filter, look down the hole and rotate the flywheel so the hole is closed. You don't want to have to crack open the cases cuz you dropped a screw in there.

You probably should order a new float and also some new fuel line in case yours is getting cracked or brittle. They're cheap.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 50s x2 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7173
Location: seattle/athens
Sun Nov 19, 2017 9:53 am quote
classic rider wrote:
...
The carb itself is pretty easy to remove and work on. The biggest potential problem is dropping something into the engine through an open rotary valve when removing or installing the carb or while the carb is off. I rotate the engine so the valve is closed. The fuel line can be fun to get off and on as well. You also might want to get a new base gasket along with the rebuild kit.
Good call to inform a first timer about closing that rotary valve! But why fight the fuel line trying to get it off the carb? Unless new, it's likely semi-hard & gripping to those grooves in the banjo fitting. She can just undo the 10MM bolt/screw that holds the banjo on and leave it in the airbox.

I had an 'English racer' w/ Sturmy Archer 4 speed in the hub but I thought those Stingrays and their look-a-likes were 'kids bikes', riding on my big full size wheels. I was full of myself, even way back then .
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1980 P200E, 1974 Primavera, 04 Ninja 250
Joined: 04 Apr 2013
Posts: 3760
Location: San Diego, CA
Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:38 pm quote
Good call Voodoo on the banjo fitting. Why create trouble you don't need to?
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:29 pm quote
Those Sting Rays are so cool with the "stick shift" on the sissy bar. Never seen one in real life, but now I'm keeping my eyes peeled because they look so fun. I kind of have a knack for finding unrecognized value at garage sales and vintage shops, so expecting/hoping to discover one in the next few months. My 8 yo son (who geeks out about cool vintage stuff as much as I do) would really rock an old Sting Ray. And I'd want to try it too.

Thanks for all the tips on the carb. I've been a little derailed from that project trying to prep for T-giving and Christmas. Probably it'll be January before I get around to it. But I'll need all the help I can get. I WILL close the rotary valve and not drop screws into the motor.

The weather here is holding, so I went for a little spin today. Made me a bit nervous to venture very far from home because I was still noticing the "problem". It's a little hard to pinpoint what it is. But, it kind of feels like I'm moving forward and then something pulls me back a little. Which I interpret as a slight loss of power.

I checked the spark plug, which is brand new. I'm not experienced at gauging the appearance, but it did look kind of wet with oil. The brass clip was contacting properly. It was screwed down snug, but not super tight.

So, I don't know. It ran okay for 25 minutes, but didn't feel super strong. I'm riding faster than I used to, though. Experience and better balance has led to more confident riding. To the point where I'm ready for some music. Singing to myself is not adequate

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P125X, P200E
Joined: 02 Apr 2011
Posts: 586
Location: Fresno, CA
Tue May 22, 2018 2:38 pm quote
Riding season
So are you riding again? We are looking forward to reading more posts from you.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Tue May 22, 2018 7:35 pm quote
Fatbear5 wrote:
So are you riding again? We are looking forward to reading more posts from you.
Hey Fatbear. And hello to the rest of the NSM. You bet I'm riding again! And having the time of my life doing it. I feel kind of dumb posting in this crazy old thread, since I'm well past the dreamer/new owner stage. Not sure what stage I'm in though. Still get the "kid at Christmas" feeling when I zoom out of the driveway. Freeeeeee-dom!!!

Winter here is long, very very long. I put all scooter-related stuff on the back burner. Was going to rebuild the carb, but didn't. The reality of going out to the dark subzero garage and fiddling with freezing cold metal held no appeal. So little Blue sat lonely all winter under the tarp. The spring snow-melt flooded the garage floor (it's really just an old shed for all intents and purposes) and then Blue's tires and tarp were frozen to the ground in three inches of ice. For weeks. Was sad to see. I had low expectations for the future.

But guess what? Spring finally came and Blue's tires unfroze and I wheeled her out into the sun. Under ten kicks and she was alive! The magic was back. Putt-putt-PUTT!! Meep-meep! Two-stroke perfume. I felt the love again.

I took a few timid rides in low traffic areas and then I felt ready for more. Last August, I was a total beginner and only got a few hours of riding under my belt before the season ended. This year feels different. Tonight I rode my work commute route--a dry run in preparation. It's always very heavy traffic in the afternoons and has seemed pretty dangerous. But now I think it's a go. It was so fun to ride through a cityscape. Restaurants, shopping malls, gas stations, exhaust fumes.

I think I love the smells the most. Riding around and experiencing the world through the air. Like a dog, I suppose.

So yeah, I'm riding again. And it is still the absolute best!



PS: I haven't mentioned my one mechanical issue because I know I'm supposed to read through all the past posts before I ask questions. But, just so you know, my fuel tap seems to have gone awry. When I stop, turn the tap off, and try to run the fuel out of the carb, it never runs out. Not sure this is a big problem, but it didn't do this last year. I still turn it off anyway.

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BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2794
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Wed May 23, 2018 3:56 am quote
Kimono! Good to see you back!

Glad you survived the winter. You know I'm available to help with mechanical issues.

JKJ
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Wed May 23, 2018 8:21 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
I think I love the smells the most. Riding around and experiencing the world through the air. Like a dog, I suppose.
Yeah, that doesn't get old. There's also something different about riding in to work in the morning instead of driving. It makes you more in tune with your city.

Gotta be super- vigilant when you're commuting on a bike, though. I've had drivers attempt to "splat" me in all sorts of bizarre ways. You have to expect them to do something stupid and be ready to respond before they do it.

Commuting drivers are the worst.

Best,
-Slashy
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Fri May 25, 2018 12:12 pm quote
GoSlash27 wrote:
Gotta be super- vigilant when you're commuting on a bike, though. I've had drivers attempt to "splat" me in all sorts of bizarre ways. You have to expect them to do something stupid and be ready to respond before they do it.

Commuting drivers are the worst.

Best,
-Slashy
Thanks, Slashy. You are 100% correct about commuting drivers. I have not yet commuted via scoot. But this morning, I decided to drive and pretend I was riding, noting any potential dangers.

Aaaand, I got sideswiped at 40 mph by a driver who did not even pull over after the hit. I got her license number and will call it in later. But, it made me rethink commuting on the vespa. I told my family when I bought it that I would minimize risks. They seem to want me around for a while (who else will cook the food and wash the dirty socks?). So, Blue may remain my funtime friend and not my commuter cutie. It's okay. The upside is no helmet hair at work. The downside is less scooting

Jkj--thanks for your kind offer of mechanical help. Crossing my fingers that this will be a season of light mechanics.
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BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2794
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Fri May 25, 2018 12:23 pm quote
Oh no! That's a bummer. Glad you weren't hurt, and that there's insurance for damaged cars. I hope this doesn't put you off scooting altogether, but I understand everybody has to decide for themselves what risks one is willing to take.

I'm eagerly awaiting the Heck's Angels ride tomorrow. 17 riders signed up so far.
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Fri May 25, 2018 1:06 pm quote
Commuters!

I'm glad you're okay. Nothing a little insurance won't fix.

If you decide to tackle commuting at a later date, the trick is to not allow anybody to drive in a position where they can threaten you. Keep lots of space, watch those idiots like a hawk, and assume that they are trying to hit you. Whenever possible, try to pick a route that has low commuter traffic. Idiot drivers tend to stick to the main streets.

It takes a lot away from the enjoyment of riding, unfortunately... but it's still more fun than driving.

Best,
-Slashy
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Sat Aug 11, 2018 3:57 am quote
*Bump* Hey Kimono, how's things?
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Sun Aug 12, 2018 7:27 pm quote
Hey, Slashy. Good to hear from you. How are things, you ask...?

Well, they are great, actually. I just celebrated my one-year anniversary with someone very special in my life. We've had a whirlwind romance these past twelve months. You know how it is when you meet someone so damn attractive that you just can't quit staring at them? Well, that's how this was. I set aside most other things in my life just so we could sneak off together, sometimes early in the morning, sometimes a quickie in the afternoon. It was love at first sight.

But then, as these things do, it took a bit of a turn. Moodiness, difficult personality traits, unpredictability. We fought passionately many times and finally learned that extreme patience is very important and that if we wanted to save the relationship, there was a lot of work to be done.

Infatuation turned into true love as we worked through our differences and got to know each other in a more meaningful way. I'm proud to say that as we embark on year two of our relationship, we have reached a new level of intimacy. We can't live without each other. It was meant to be...

I love you, Blue❤️


PS: to celebrate our anniversary, we took our first night ride together. I have some pics. Let me dig for them.

PSS: if you think this post is totally ridiculous, that's okay. I was there and this is how it went. Vespas are glorious to crush on.

PSSS: ending a sentence with a preposition is okay if you do it on purpose.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Sun Aug 12, 2018 7:35 pm quote
t-clocs

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Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Sun Aug 12, 2018 7:36 pm quote
Toreador Pants

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Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Sun Aug 12, 2018 7:39 pm quote
Riding off into the sunset with my crush

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Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Sun Aug 12, 2018 7:48 pm quote


I never understood what toreador pants were. A total mystery to me. And now the light dawns. I tried to type at + g at t. But it may post as toreador pants.

Night riding was awesome as you all probably know already. I hadn't done it because of the mega potholes around town and fear of falling right into them.

But the quietness of the evening and the heavy, damp, earthy night air was almost tranquilizing. I forgot about the potholes and listened to the frogs and crickets. I wanted to ride all night. A natural high.

Happy summer night rides to you all!
Ossessionato
1976 Super (x 2), 1974 Primavera (x 2), 2006 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 4866
Location: So Cal
Mon Aug 13, 2018 4:32 am quote
Can’t give your posts enough positives, K. I’ve said before, these scoots reward you in proportion to the attention you give them. Happy for you n Blue.

Once in a while in a big blue moon
There comes a night like this
Like some surrealist
Invented this
Night ride home


- Joni Mitchell
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Mon Aug 13, 2018 5:42 am quote
Any luck getting the hubby infected with the Vespa bug?
-Slashy
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Joined: 12 Sep 2014
Posts: 656

Mon Aug 13, 2018 7:14 am quote
The hubby should be on a Vespa in toreador pants as well.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Mon Aug 13, 2018 8:48 pm quote
SoCalGuy wrote:
Once in a while in a big blue moon
There comes a night like this
Like some surrealist
Invented this
Night ride home


- Joni Mitchell
Thanks, SoCalGuy. I watched Joni sing it on YouTube tonight. I've heard her name, but never heard her music 'til now. Good song, evocative.

No, hubby will not be wearing the toreador pants. He has no love for vespa. But to be fair, only one of us can gear up and ride into the night. The other must stay home with the little people.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 50s x2 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7173
Location: seattle/athens
Mon Aug 13, 2018 9:12 pm quote
night rider girl
Kimono32 wrote:
.....

PSSS: ending a sentence with a preposition is okay if you do it on purpose.
Hey now, what you doing, making up your own rules?

Regardless, the rest of your post was pretty good, so you write as you like. It was so good that I'm reminded of a grade school rhyme.
Nowhere in a league w/ Joni Mitchell, but I did actually think of this when I read your post:

You're a poet
But you don't know it
Your feet show it
They're Longfellows


That's gotta leave a sizable footprint

sorry, apologies all around
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 471
Location: MN
Tue Aug 14, 2018 1:00 pm quote
Good, V oodoo. But I rather enjoyed the heifer/hoof comment. Betcha thought I didn't see it.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 50s x2 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7173
Location: seattle/athens
Tue Aug 14, 2018 5:20 pm quote
I will go stand in the corner now.
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