I've been concerned for a while!
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Enthusiast
1972 Vespa GTR, 1963 Lambretta LI 125
Joined: 05 Nov 2018
Posts: 81
Location: Halifax, England
Sun May 19, 2019 2:59 pm quote
Ok so this is my thinking, I'm 45, I love my scoot and the whole history nostalgia and friendship scoots bring. I go on runs, have had wkends away and have got dirty fixing mine and friends and strangers vintage scoots.
But I fear we are a dying bunch of enthusiasts. I see rev and go scoots all over. The other day my young neighbour who was on a rev and go called by. We chatted, I looked at his Chinese scoot and saw his main engine frame bolt was hanging out by 4 inch.
I saved his life by putting it right. He had no idea at all. (Yeah I exaggerated a bit).
My point being is this. As we all grow older and die, our scoots will lose value as the kids don't want them, and the government's want rid.
We as enthusiasts need to do something to keep it going. You scooter shop people need to lengthen your view on the market. It will go. The mod, 60's 70's 80s fashion is drifting away. What can we do?
. There is nothing wrong with modern rev and goes but our vintage stuff is going to drift away I think.

What do you people think?
Enthusiast
Joined: 02 Feb 2019
Posts: 78

Sun May 19, 2019 3:37 pm quote
Try living in a country that never had the huge number of scooters, and rallies, etc.
After Piaggio left the USA in the early 80s there were only a few vintage scooter shops in the entire nation, mostly in California. For most of the nation you were completely on your own....no rallies, no clubs, no repair shops, no parts suppliers, no internet to instantly find what you need. NOTHING. At that point the "value" of your vintage scooter was only what it meant to you personally. Other than that, there was no market. Without the internet, you just put an ad in the local newspaper, or if you knew other scooterists you just tried to verbally spread the word amongst your tiny community.

These days it's a virtual cornucopia for vintage scooterists. There are rallies and clubs all over the nation. That was completely unthinkable in the 80s. I never would have dreamed it would get as good as it is right now. It's all in your perspective.

I imagine that within 20 years 2-stroke engines will be banned completely and there will be businesses making electric conversion kits for the old Vespas. I know they make them now, but better ones with longer battery life and higher speeds. It won't be the same experience, but at least it will save them from the junk heap.
Molto Verboso
Joined: 26 Oct 2015
Posts: 1822

Sun May 19, 2019 4:10 pm quote
I've thought about it as well. My thought is that we aren't getting any new blood into the vintage scooters. Why?...well one reason that all of us long time vintage owners have jacked the price up of the scooters so much, that the younger crowd can't afford them. The only way to keep vintage scooter scene alive is to get the younger crowd interested in them. What kid in there right mind would pay $10k to $20k for a rare Vespa or Lambretta?

I'm going to guess that the average age the "youngest" vintage scooter owner would be in the early 40's (probably closer to 45 years old?). That means that most of the older generation of scooterists would be closer to 65+. I wonder how many highly collectable TV's, GP's, SX's, GS's, SS's are locked up somewhere in someones living room, to be used as a centerpiece? I'm predicting that the value for those same machines will keep going up for about another 10 years, then there's going to be a drastic price drop in them because all of us will be older and die off (sad but true).

I'm one of those people who would actually ride a SX200 as a daily rider (if i owned one), so i don't fit in the catagory of "a hidden not ridden" owner.

Three years ago i sold my '74 GTR to a local kid who was in love with Vespas, and what Vespas were all about. I sold it to him for $1400. The scooter was in tip-top mechanical shape. I let it go cheap to him because i wanted the younger generation to get into the vintage scene. Ans when i mean vintage, i don't mean a LML Stella.
Hooked
bare metal cafe racer
Joined: 01 Sep 2017
Posts: 474
Location: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Sun May 19, 2019 4:18 pm quote
Well Iím not exactly younger crowd but only 1year into this gig. Wrenching Vespas.

One of the draws is the fact that a vintage vehicle (>40yrs... like me ) in NZ costs... (poetically) $40/yr to register.

Whereas a <40yo>50cc scooter (=motorcycle) costs $450/yr.

So seems the government here wants me to ride my vintage street racer.

Also... thereís a kid (20?) who bombs my street on his zip. Pulls a wheelie for ~150m. One hand. Few times a week I reckon. Guessing he has messed with that zip although it doesnít look like it on the outside.

I want to catch that on video but keep missing it. Have to be quick...
Enthusiast
Joined: 02 Feb 2019
Posts: 78

Sun May 19, 2019 4:32 pm quote
whodatschrome wrote:
I've thought about it as well. My thought is that we aren't getting any new blood into the vintage scooters. Why?...well one reason that all of us long time vintage owners have jacked the price up of the scooters so much, that the younger crowd can't afford them. The only way to keep vintage scooter scene alive is to get the younger crowd interested in them. What kid in there right mind would pay $10k to $20k for a rare Vespa or Lambretta?

I'm going to guess that the average age the "youngest" vintage scooter owner would be in the early 40's (probably closer to 45 years old?). That means that most of the older generation of scooterists would be closer to 65+. I wonder how many highly collectable TV's, GP's, SX's, GS's, SS's are locked up somewhere in someones living room, to be used as a centerpiece? I'm predicting that the value for those same machines will keep going up for about another 10 years, then there's going to be a drastic price drop in them because all of us will be older and die off (sad but true).

I'm one of those people who would actually ride a SX200 as a daily rider (if i owned one), so i don't fit in the catagory of "a hidden not ridden" owner.

Three years ago i sold my '74 GTR to a local kid who was in love with Vespas, and what Vespas were all about. I sold it to him for $1400. The scooter was in tip-top mechanical shape. I let it go cheap to him because i wanted the younger generation to get into the vintage scene. Ans when i mean vintage, i don't mean a LML Stella.
I don't know where you are located, but you are quoting prices in dollars. Australian dollars maybe?

If you are talking about geriatrics hoarding expensive trailer queen Lambrettas, that's quite different than the "kid" riding an old beater Vespa around town. There are definitely people in their 20s/30s riding old Vespas in my town. I don't hang with teenagers so I couldn't confirm anything there, but most 16, 17, 18 year olds can't afford to buy anything at all, and these days they are probably going to spend $ on laptops, tablets, video games, etc.

You don't need to spend anywhere close to $10k for an old Vespa. That's just absurd.
You can get a beater P200 for $1500. Other models like VBBs or Sprints or Supers are also affordable. "Kids" these days seem to find the thousands of dollars more that are required to buy brand new automatic Vespas.
Addicted
2016 LXV 150 ie, 1978 Vespa P125, 2019 Piaggio Liberty 150
Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 531
Location: central Illinois USA
Sun May 19, 2019 4:42 pm quote
OH, man, I need to tell all those 35 and under guys down in the St. Louis area they are doing it wrong....those loud, smelly rides seem very popular with some who are the age of my sons and younger. They are learning to upkeep their own rides, they show up at that Missouri Loves Company Rally, and they have some of those scooter running damn fast. Riding scooters older than they are. Itís not about shiny paint for some of them, but it is about fixing it in a dark parking lot, about helping push when a pal has a kick start problem, source parts, shared knowledge and a lot of laughs.
Ossessionato
1976 Super (x 2), 1974 Primavera (x 2), 2006 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 4883
Location: So Cal
Sun May 19, 2019 5:12 pm quote
No shortage of old scoots out here

318EAFBB-0652-4D4C-B28C-37FCE9B2CD46.jpeg

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 7094
Location: Victoria, Australia
Sun May 19, 2019 6:50 pm quote
It's not just scooters. All the older vehicles go up in price after a gradual dip down to scrap price (well not all go that far down). Check out the average price of a Mini these days... and no not the pretend ones.
I'm hearing the price of veteran cars is down at the moment. I also heard a statistic that most people desire a classic vehicle that's from the year they were born give or take a few years. If that's true then it's the exceptions that are young and interested in the older vehicles.

Even though we never had the imports stopped since the beginning, prices are much higher here than in the US. That will also keep the younger buyers away.
Ossessionato
1991 T5 Pole Position, 2008 LXS 125, 2013 Peugeot Metropolis RS
Joined: 06 May 2011
Posts: 3257
Location: Staffordshire UK
Mon May 20, 2019 12:33 am quote
I often think that the way government legislation is going (biggest threat to 2-stroke vehicles imo), my grandchildren will need to treat my Vespa T5 like the Red Barchetta in Rush's song, and will probably end up getting chased by a 'gleaming alloy air car' (okay, okay, it's me getting chased by alloy air cars )

Different scooter scenes come and go, but we are riding bikes that were built (in some cases) not long after the 2nd world war! I don't reckon these bikes are going anywhere anytime soon.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
a not so normal vbb2 '64, a weirdo vbx '86 and a not so normal pts100 '82
Joined: 15 Jun 2009
Posts: 5488
Location: Indo
Mon May 20, 2019 3:22 am quote
Aint happen here in Indonesia, lots new kids grow and everyone want a old vespa, this making the price sky high and getting difiicult for me to buy another $100 vespa, and this young are crazy in spending their allowance as well, once i negotiation on a headlamp when the seller ask $10 and i only had $2, i almost have it but the youngster just easly paid $10 plus extra, talk about a manner
Ossessionato
1979 P200e
Joined: 18 Mar 2013
Posts: 2478
Location: Lock Haven, PA
Mon May 20, 2019 3:24 am quote
Oh Relax!

They probably said the same thing about the Baby Boomers too.... that they'd give up the old ways of doing things, and the Model T Fords were going to fade into oblivion.

Didn't happen... the earliest Boomers made Hot Rod culture explode in the late 60's, and the car manufacturers were putting out some sweet and powerful stuff.

Every year for the past 5 years I've ridden in the Distinguished Gentleman's ride, and I've seen a lot of younger guys (and ladies) riding 1970s UJM bikes, the more modified the better. And a few on Vespas.

Only problem is that this is a game which takes a bit of pocket change to participate in (Mr Pryor is gonna have my head for ending a sentence in a preposition). I don't spend all that much on my P200 (It's borderline vintage), but an engine overhaul is in the future.

Only other thing I can say concerns me is that us as an older generation (40-55 or so) don't often fix things ourselves, so we haven't passed down the "can do" attitude towards mechanical stuff to our kids. OTOH, we have YouTube which can show you, step by step, how to do just about anything.
Ossessionato
73 Rally, 74 Rally, 76 ET3, 80 P200, 63 Li125, 65 Li225 Silver Special, 86 Elite 80, 2015 HD Road Glide Special, 2011 Ural Tourist
Joined: 18 Jan 2012
Posts: 3279
Location: Oceanside/ SF
Mon May 20, 2019 3:26 am quote
Iím 35 and I have one local Vespa acquaintance younger than myself. The other 10 are all 50 and over. With Lambrettaís, the odds are worse- 2 friends, both mid 40s.

Thereís plenty of cheap scooters and parts sources around me but thereís no interest in them by the local kids. Computers/ phones have won this round.

I think we need to wait out this generation of soft millenials for the next crop that are a little more adventurous. Or at least my friends kids give me hope that they will be.
Addicted
Vespa lxv 125 vie dell moda Chianti
Joined: 28 Aug 2012
Posts: 764
Location: Cheshire
Mon May 20, 2019 9:27 am quote
in the uk the price of lambrettas and vespas from the 60's and 70's and probably some of the 80's vepas is prohibitive to a lot of younger scooter enthusiast case in point i had a TV GT 200 in the 70's till about 1984 rebuilt it and re-sprayed it twice bought for £30.00 sold it for £180.00 i thought i got a good price then. same scooter now in good condition is £8000.00 plus what 17 18 year old can afford that. its easier to enter the scooter scene with cheaper twist and go scooters.
Hooked
1974 200 Rally, 1970 180 Rally, 1980 P150X and P200E
Joined: 22 May 2017
Posts: 177
Location: George, South Africa
Mon May 20, 2019 10:31 am quote
Piaggio also withdrew from South Africa in the 80's, but a lot of our dads/granddads drove Vespas, thus we younger generation knew about them.

I got my first Vespa in 2009, and my son was then in his second last year of high school. When I brought the Vespa home, he wanted to know what the hell it was! Eventually he drove mine to school, and the other kids had some snotty comments about his wheels. But thanks to the internet, they became quickly aware that a Vespa was the ultimate vintage scooter to have. Nowadays there are quite a few kids in our town who ride Vespas. (To maintain them is a different story!)

I restore Vespas as a hobby (54 so far), and most of them were for their original owners, but quite a lot went to customers younger than 40. And even some girls ordered smallframe Vespas. In comparison to a new Vespa, a vintage model is quite affordable, so I think the (more affordable) vintage models will still be with us for a long time.
Hooked
Vespa
Joined: 25 May 2016
Posts: 381
Location: US
Mon May 20, 2019 11:30 am quote
SoCalGuy wrote:
No shortage of old scoots out here
Was that GoFast Scoot Event in Orange county? last weekend?
Veni, Vidi, Posti
a not so normal vbb2 '64, a weirdo vbx '86 and a not so normal pts100 '82
Joined: 15 Jun 2009
Posts: 5488
Location: Indo
Mon May 20, 2019 12:42 pm quote
SoCalGuy wrote:
No shortage of old scoots out here
seeing this pics over and over again make me wanna show u how we do rally here in Indo
and seeing the youngrter i have to hipnotize myself in front of a mirror and said i am still young, i got the spirit and stamina in me, i will not lose to these youngster
stay young and cheer guys
Molto Verboso
1980 P200E project, 2005 Stella Mal 177 MKIII in pieces
Joined: 20 Jul 2018
Posts: 1127
Location: Staten Island, NY
Mon May 20, 2019 2:10 pm quote
Regarding spoiled millennials not wanting to get hands dirty or be interested in more complicated scooters, i think that is inaccurate. Times change. Interests change. I think it's as simple as that, along with the finances issue.

For example, my uncle grew up with motorcycles and motorcycle clubs being a popular activity. He got one and joined a motorcycle club as soon as he could. And still is an active member of the same one 40 yrs later. I grew up with him having Harley's but motorcycle clubs not being popular, already fading culture...the rise of the internet and home computers replaced it for my generation, so my profession centers around that stuff, but I've always been interested in motorcycles as a result of him. I recently went to my first scooter rally and then a week later went to visit my uncle and hung out at his clubs event to compare the two similar but different groups. Both were fun, but i do not see myself regularly going to rallies or joining a club as it just doesn't draw me in like it does him or others. For me, i just want to ride alone and mess with the bike alone as something physical and mental not involving computers or tv which is my profession.

The other aspect is the finances. I'm 39 and just got into it last year because my uncle gave this Stella to me in exchange for getting a motorcycle license, simply because he wanted me to finally get a Harley and realized i would never get the license if i didn't have a cheap bike to get started on. I've always wanted to get a mc license but never did because i couldn't afford even used ones. Any new ptw is still too expensive for my blood.. yes I'll spend that much over time doing things to it myself but that's my mo. More into doing it myself willing to spend equal parts over time than one big chunk at once with no personal story to go with it.

In the past year I've spent a total of $550 up front for a Stella 2T, Stella cvt and a 1980 p200e and if i had to spend what many here think is the true value of these older scooters, then i would not be riding a scooter. Ive seen this topic come up in passing with people not happy about bodges selling for more than originals, which i agree it's lame, but across the board i think people over value these vintages simply because they mean so much to the small niche you have been in for so long. The reality is that for all but the most collectible scooter models the market is not there for high value price tag on vintage scooters. It's value is what someone is willing to pay for it, and Craigslist is full of ads that endlessly renew but never sell.

Our culture has changed whether we like it or not. Younger people will come around if it's around them and affordable. Perfect example is analog photography. I got my degree in it and was the last generation to learn analog photography in camera and in the darkroom by default. Since then everything is digital and i used to get frustrated that younger people had no interest in it. Used cameras were still expensive and the process took too long and too much infrastructure for people. Used camera prices have come down drastically in recent years and at the same time younger people have grown in interest and willingness to participate. Id rather that then people holding onto cameras waiting for the most money on eBay. Those cameras would then just start to decay in closets unused. I've seen it in action with a young guy at work who found an old film camera at a relatives house and came to me for advice on how to use it. A year later and that kid is die hard for analog photography with his own growing collection. Plus a bonus result of the down market for camera values is I've been able to acquire many bucket list cameras i could never afford previously and they actually get used and cared for which is the most important thing.
Enthusiast
1972 Vespa GTR, 1963 Lambretta LI 125
Joined: 05 Nov 2018
Posts: 81
Location: Halifax, England
Mon May 20, 2019 3:24 pm quote
Ok so some quite interesting views out there. I personally dont see any youngsters on our scoots and I have been on a few multimeets lately. It could well be a cost thing, or the fact that the idea of having to mess with the scoots to keep them running just does not appeal.
I know when I was young I was always tinkering with something be it model cars or planes or making go carts, but the youth of today through my experience with them have no interest. It is all mobile phones game stations and facebook etc, but hey that's progress and I dare say my parents did things I would have had no interest in.
But when you think you can get a 50cc chinese scoot for £1200 or a PK50 in need of work for the same price, the brand new shiny rev and go will always win out.

Time will tell but I personally think in 20 years we will all be sat on scoots worth half the value they are today as us lot will cark it and there will be little demand.

At the moment though it's very healthy and in about a 200m circle around my house alone there are 4 other enthusiasts, each older than myself.
Molto Verboso
1980 P200E project, 2005 Stella Mal 177 MKIII in pieces
Joined: 20 Jul 2018
Posts: 1127
Location: Staten Island, NY
Mon May 20, 2019 3:55 pm quote
Perfect example of the insanity here:
https://newyork.craigslist.org/brk/mcy/d/brooklyn-2008-vespastella-low-miles/6889969119.html

Asking more than the original msrp for a scooter that literally has no demand. Granted it's not exactly vintage but it's par for the course. I know some early to mid 20s kids who would easily pick that up for 1200-1600.
Ossessionato
Joined: 22 Oct 2011
Posts: 4042
Location: Tega Cay, SC
Mon May 20, 2019 5:52 pm quote
I will mention one thing that comes to mind: 20, 30, 40 years from now , these 2 stroke classic scoots will still be worked on, running and ridden. The plastic scoots will be in the scrap yards.
Ossessionato
05 Stella, '62 VBB, 76 Sprint V, 63 GL
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 2256
Location: Chicago. Well, Evanston, but that's almost Chicago
Tue May 21, 2019 4:34 am quote
swiss1939 wrote:
https://newyork.craigslist.org/brk/mcy/d/brooklyn-2008-vespastella-low-miles/6889969119.html
Off topic, but the listing says it's a 4t, yet it has a sight glass.

As to the state of the hobby, it's a manifestation of changing economic tastes overall. "Kids today" don't have the space, the money, or the know-how, and the ones that do seem to all be riding cafe racers, at least in Chicago.

That's not to say that they don't appreciate scooters. People of all ages ask me about my Sprint on a regular basis, and my 18-yo daughter's friends are all in awe of it, both as an aesthetic object as well as my ability to work on it. She brought some of them out to the workshop when I was rebuilding the motor and they were fascinated by it. They are so used to things being either electronic, so the action is invisible, or sealed shut. Either way, they had never seen the inside of a motor.

At their age, though, I hadn't either. I grew up in the 80's, when auto shop and other trade skills classes were "loser classes." "Smart kids" took calculus and computer programming.

So don't give up hope just yet--if anything, the Internet is helping maintain a critical *economic* mass of scooterists, which is the key--so long as there is adequate demand to keep the mail order sites in business, the supply chain for parts will continue to exist, and that's what will ultimately make or break the hobby in the long run.

It's hard enough to learn how to work on these things. Imagine having to be a master machinist with a Bridgeport or a Tormach to make the parts you need. That would be the death of the hobby.
Molto Verboso
1980 P200E project, 2005 Stella Mal 177 MKIII in pieces
Joined: 20 Jul 2018
Posts: 1127
Location: Staten Island, NY
Tue May 21, 2019 4:51 am quote
chandlerman wrote:
swiss1939 wrote:
https://newyork.craigslist.org/brk/mcy/d/brooklyn-2008-vespastella-low-miles/6889969119.html
Off topic, but the listing says it's a 4t, yet it has a sight glass.

As to the state of the hobby, it's a manifestation of changing economic tastes overall. "Kids today" don't have the space, the money, or the know-how, and the ones that do seem to all be riding cafe racers, at least in Chicago.

That's not to say that they don't appreciate scooters. People of all ages ask me about my Sprint on a regular basis, and my 18-yo daughter's friends are all in awe of it, both as an aesthetic object as well as my ability to work on it. She brought some of them out to the workshop when I was rebuilding the motor and they were fascinated by it. They are so used to things being either electronic, so the action is invisible, or sealed shut. Either way, they had never seen the inside of a motor.

At their age, though, I hadn't either. I grew up in the 80's, when auto shop and other trade skills classes were "loser classes." "Smart kids" took calculus and computer programming.

So don't give up hope just yet--if anything, the Internet is helping maintain a critical *economic* mass of scooterists, which is the key--so long as there is adequate demand to keep the mail order sites in business, the supply chain for parts will continue to exist, and that's what will ultimately make or break the hobby in the long run.

It's hard enough to learn how to work on these things. Imagine having to be a master machinist with a Bridgeport or a Tormach to make the parts you need. That would be the death of the hobby.
I double taked on that also.. it says 4 speed manual, not 4T.

What you said is exactly my point. Kids will get into it if its around them and affordable. On the bright side, there is a wealth of information online, specifically youtube on how to fix everything to do with these scooters. I have gone from never touching an engine to doing everything myself on these scooters in 1 year thanks to MV, Robot at SW and Lee of thatscooterthing on youtube! I often worry about the same issue with analog photography cameras. there is much less information out there on how to repair classic photo cameras, the repairmen are a dying breed... and on top of that tend to be way more insular and protective of their knowledge than the vintage scooter mechanics. Repairing cameras also requires a lot more specialized tools, as a result, that repair knowledge is fading. I have thought about approaching my repair guy to learn from him, but know that would be shot down instantly.

Most camera stores don't even repair these old cameras themselves, they all send them to 1 or 2 guys in the region who work on them from home. My repair guy is the guy for NYC, who just happens to live down the street. So good luck in 15 years when the youngest of these repair guys at 60 start passing away.
Hooked
Vespa
Joined: 25 May 2016
Posts: 381
Location: US
Tue May 21, 2019 12:44 pm quote
This is also mind boggling, I've seen many ads selling Lambretta 150 S1 or S2 is in the 5-7k range and most went unsold at this price. These scoot aren't gold. Why push up the price that high?

Youngsters in the 20-30 these days don't have 5-7k to buy toys. Sadly, many of them are still living with parents or struggling to pay rent.
Ossessionato
05 Stella, '62 VBB, 76 Sprint V, 63 GL
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 2256
Location: Chicago. Well, Evanston, but that's almost Chicago
Tue May 21, 2019 1:29 pm quote
Swiss, you and I are seeing the exact same thing. I started with a Haynes Manual and worked my way up, learning by destroying the first several steps of the way.

So, switching up the topic a little bit, I'll borrowi the question that people love to ask musicians, what were everyone's influences (that led them to wrenching & riding vintage scooters)?

I learned not to be afraid to get my hands dirty from my dad, who put himself through school working heavy carpentry. I spent plenty of weekends in my youth either as his assistant or just watching and learning while we did everything from built fences to painting rooms and even rewiring rooms.

I learned not to be afraid to take things apart by taking things apart and having reasonably good luck putting them back together. Once PC's were a thing, I was hacking (writing) code and learning everything I could from the first moment I saw one.

I fell in love with vintage scooters at my father-in-law's house. He had a couple of Vespas, including my VBB, and I just thought they were damn col little bikes, even if much of the world doesn't seem to agree.

Pull it all together and I've become a gearhead who doesn't own a car, but loves turning these humble little beasts into hot-rod monsters, then riding them around and parking them on the street all day like the basic transportation they were built to be.

How about the rest of you?
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 7094
Location: Victoria, Australia
Wed May 22, 2019 3:01 am quote
Ha ha! I learned by being too cheap to get anyone else to do it!!
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:32 am
NotAutomatic has been ejected from this topic
Molto Verboso
Gina, 1965 Vespa 180SS, Bella,1968 Vespa 150 Super, (Both NZ new Airco assembled), Francesca, 2006 Vespa LX150, Sofia, 2007 Vespa GT200
Joined: 21 Jan 2015
Posts: 1241
Location: Hamilton, NZ
Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:10 pm quote
I fell in love with them when they were "the thing" in the sixties but couldn't afford them. Fast forward to early this century and our son was approaching his 21st birthday. Despite being born in the 80s he was a real child of the seventies (and a little earlier) being deeply into Queen music and other influential bands like the Who. We decided a Vespa was the perfect gift for his transport in Wellington, New Zealand's capital city and it has hills like San Francisco. So, 3 days before the big reveal it s*&t itself and I had to learn how to fit a replacement motor. That led to us buying Bella, and the rest is history and dirty hands so often.
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