Anyone trade in their scooter for Triumph or Moto Guzzi?
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Hooked
2017 BMW F800GS
Joined: 10 Feb 2012
Posts: 437
Location: Philadelphia, USA
Mon Dec 30, 2019 3:38 pm quote
Scooter trade-in for a cafe racer style like a Triumph or Moto Guzzi?

If yes, happy with the decision?
Veni, Vidi, Posti
LX190, Primavera
Joined: 12 Oct 2007
Posts: 6480
Location: New Zealand
Mon Dec 30, 2019 4:01 pm quote
I went Guzzi to Vespa. Very happy with the decision as I didnít need a larger bike any longer and love the convenience and practicality of the scooter.
Ossessionato
2015 GTS300, 1974 Primavera, 04 Ninja 250
Joined: 04 Apr 2013
Posts: 4426
Location: San Diego, CA
Mon Dec 30, 2019 4:46 pm quote
Those Guzzis are beautiful but I have no experience with them. Iíd like to, though
Enthusiast
1987 Honda Helix
Joined: 19 Feb 2015
Posts: 62
Location: Houston Tx
Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:03 pm quote
Everyone should have a Moto Guzzi at least once in their life.
Hooked
'05 Chetak. '65 Fuji Rabbit, '14 Moto Guzzi
Joined: 18 Sep 2007
Posts: 134
Location: Rhode Island
Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:22 pm quote
Yes
I've owned and ridden a few scooters and motorcycles since 1980. Suzuki, Yamaha, BMW, Honda, Kymco, Bajaj, . Moto Guzzi V7 Special bought 2015.
IMO, the V7 (1) is a well engineered bike reminiscent of the 1980 Suzuki GS450 I had as a pup, but with more horses, fuel injection, and shaft drive.
Oh, and the engine is turned around like it should be.
I have only positives to say about the bike itself, but dealers and service are not local to everyone.
If you're a DIY person, there's plenty of info for maintenance on Youknowwhat, not too difficult for basic stuff

Don't know what your riding experience is, but going from small wheels to bigger is certainly different.

Ride like everyone else is asleep!
Enthusiast
PX150E
Joined: 28 Oct 2018
Posts: 75
Location: Florida, USA
Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:45 pm quote
My 3 Italian ladies....
I still have both, a Guzzi and my PX150E, and enjoy them almost equally. But my PX is the one that gets ridden the most.
I love its agility, practicality and its do it all features that no regular motorcycle can do.
Enthusiast
PX150E
Joined: 28 Oct 2018
Posts: 75
Location: Florida, USA
Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:49 pm quote
Re: My 3 Italian ladies....
sp949 wrote:
I still have both, a Guzzi and my PX150E, and enjoy them almost equally. But my PX is the one that gets ridden the most.
I love its agility, practicality and its do it all features that no regular motorcycle can do.
And in here they are:
"Senior" Riders (Page 5)
Addicted
Buddy 125, Scarabeo 150, Scarabeo 500ie, Triumphs, Vespa Sprint 150
Joined: 26 Oct 2007
Posts: 688
Location: Charleston,SC-Knoxville, TN- Sanibel, Florida
Mon Dec 30, 2019 5:55 pm quote
I like my old Triumph's from the sixties and my Aprilia Scarabeo's.

And my Buddy 125.

Gonna hang onto them.

fried okra
Molto Verboso
2007 Vespa 250 gts / 1961 Vespa VBA / 1964 Vespa VNB
Joined: 02 Sep 2010
Posts: 1037
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Mon Dec 30, 2019 7:06 pm quote
I sold my 09 MP3 500 to get a Triumph Bonneville T100.
I wasnít overly as passionate about the MP3, and I wanted a project.
Originally I wanted to convert at Harley 1200 Sportster into a scrambler, then I thought of the Triumph...done!
It compliments my riding experience, I feel more social on my Vespa and the motorcycle reminds me of my younger days.
Addicted
2013 GTS 300ie
Joined: 14 Feb 2013
Posts: 609
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Mon Dec 30, 2019 8:35 pm quote
Hah! Funny you should post this. I had a 2009 Triumph Bonnie (1st gen EFI) that I traded in towards my 2013 Vespa GTS...that I just 2 weeks ago traded in towards a Triumph (Bonnie) Street Twin. I was happy with it both times (though I could do without the friends who said I was crazy to give up the Bonnie "for a scooter?!?" )
(If you're near Greensboro, my Vespa is for sale at the dealership.)

If I could afford to keep (and pay taxes and insurance on) two bikes, I would've kept the GTS. It's a solid tie between the two. The big difference is two things, IMHO.

1: How often interstates and 55+mph (especially 65+mph) highways factor into your riding.
2: How much other road users affect your riding.

If I could afford two bikes, I'd be very easy to talk into another scooter.
Ossessionato
Triumph Street Scrambler 2018, Suzuki VanVan200 (sold), 2015 Sprint 125 (sold)
Joined: 12 Apr 2015
Posts: 2386
Location: Finland
Tue Dec 31, 2019 12:29 am quote
Almost

I traded my Vespa for a SuzukiVanVan, which I traded in for a Triumph Street Scrambler.

If you'll emphasize the cafe racer part, then absolutely not.
I'm on the border of being rheumatic and can't ride anything ergonomically too challenging = forward leaning cafe racers are out.

I jumped into the Suzuki VanVan200 because after a long pause, the new 200cc model was imported into Finland. Always wanted to have a proper fat tyre bike for some serious forest roming I did have great fun with that bike, but in the end just ran out of forests = got a bit bored doing the same tracks over and over.

After the VanVan I thought I would like to have a retro or an ADV bike. Sampled many and ended up with a mental battle between a BMW 750 GS and Triumph Street Scrambler. The BMW being a tad better bike in most objective terms, but the Triumph being very close and... well, it has a marvellous, high torque, lowish power 900cc engine that is just much nicer unit than anything else I've ridden. Including the 1200cc version - that's nice too, but for some reason I prefer the 900cc unit.

I did try to fall in love to a Guzzi V7 too, just because it looks so nice, have that stupid but interesting engine & clutch and all that history..... but in the end there were too many compromises for me.

If a motorcycle is easy to ride, like I would say the Street Scrambler is, there is no reason why not to make short hops with it. I use my Triumph for the same short store hops I used my Vespa. Automatic transmission is superior for city riding, no denying that, but the Triumph has a really light clutch and easy gears, so it is as good as a geared bike can be.

Do I miss Vespa - not for other than nostalgic and aesthetic reasons, I've always like Vespas because they are Vespas. Also, I've always had a soft spot for small wheeled bikes as they are kind of fun... but I do prefer larger wheels when going faster, I like the more solid wheeling they provide.

Edit: I documented my thoughs NSR testing, testing and musing over bikes
there may be something usefull to you too.
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 3571
Location: Latina (Italy)
Tue Dec 31, 2019 3:58 am quote
Re: My 3 Italian ladies....
sp949 wrote:
sp949 wrote:
I still have both, a Guzzi and my PX150E, and enjoy them almost equally. But my PX is the one that gets ridden the most.
I love its agility, practicality and its do it all features that no regular motorcycle can do.
And in here they are:
"Senior" Riders (Page 5)
...and Benelli Tornado 650...
eeee-bip
Benelli TNT 125/Benelli Leoncino 500. I don't care. You can quote me.
Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 17799
Location: South East Great England of Britishland
Tue Dec 31, 2019 6:00 am quote
Electric
I always lusted after a Moto Guzzi 850 Le Mans.

There's no fat on that bike at all.

Bill x
Hooked
'13 Buddy 125 Seafoam
Joined: 25 Oct 2018
Posts: 293
Location: Southcoast, MA
Tue Dec 31, 2019 10:18 am quote
sold a '10 triumph bonneville se and bought a used '13 buddy 125 and a new husqvarna ts348xd riding lawnmower with a kawasaki engine...i'm sure i'll go back to motorcycles but i doubt i'll own another bonneville...it was very smooth and nimble but i think my next real motorcycle will be lighter and more nimble...maybe a duke 390...or svartpilen...or maybe i'll try out some type of adventure bike...who knows, depends what flavor i'm after at the time
Enthusiast
GTS 250
Joined: 18 Apr 2015
Posts: 81
Location: Beautiful West Texas
Wed Jan 01, 2020 11:27 am quote
I sold my 2007 GTS 250 and purchased a 2014 Triumph T100. The main reason was that the GTS couldnít quite keep up with the highway speeds we have here in West Texas. With a 10 or 15 mile per hour headwind, top speed was limited to 65 mph. That doesnít work when youíre riding with Burgmans and other larger motorcycles. Also, I became concerned that riding the bike wide open all the time put it at the edge of its margin of safety and reliability. Now I rode it that way for nearly 10,000 miles without a problem, but it was always a worry in the back of my mind. The T100 has all the speed I could possibly want, but itís a mixed bag compared to the Vespa. Even with a fly screen, the T 100 lacks the leg shield of the Vespa and so the rider is more out in the wind. The Vespa also seemed a little more maneuverable in town, and of course, also had that built-in storage which was hard to give up. When the Triumph came, something had to go. In a perfect world I wouldíve kept the Vespa as a runabout and the Triumph for longer trips. But I still think I made the right choice for my situation.
Hooked
2017 BMW F800GS
Joined: 10 Feb 2012
Posts: 437
Location: Philadelphia, USA
Thu Jan 02, 2020 7:31 am quote
thank you all. This is exactly my dilemma. i have had 2 Vespas and 1 Yamaha Xmax and want to try a motorcycle. I only use the motorcycle for joyriding and an occasional errand.
Hooked
'13 Buddy 125 Seafoam
Joined: 25 Oct 2018
Posts: 293
Location: Southcoast, MA
Thu Jan 02, 2020 8:00 am quote
zwniana wrote:
thank you all. This is exactly my dilemma. i have had 2 Vespas and 1 Yamaha Xmax and want to try a motorcycle. I only use the motorcycle for joyriding and an occasional errand.
3 scooters and no motorcycle...why not give it a whirl?...only thing is i would sell your scooter yourself and buy a used bike on CL and FB marketplace...lots of barely used ones out there...you take such a hit with a new bike...i'll probably never buy a new bike again (bought 2 new and 4 used)...here's a good one one near you...

https://philadelphia.craigslist.org/mcy/d/philadelphia-2014-triumph-bonneville/7039699671.html
Enthusiast
Sprint 125, Guzzi V711 Special
Joined: 21 Aug 2015
Posts: 68
Location: Wolverhampton England
Thu Jan 02, 2020 8:10 am quote
zwniana wrote:
thank you all. This is exactly my dilemma. i have had 2 Vespas and 1 Yamaha Xmax and want to try a motorcycle. I only use the motorcycle for joyriding and an occasional errand.
I currently have a Vespa Sprint and Triumph Speedmaster 1200. Until recently, the Moto Guzzi V7 was in there too.

For what you want...the Guzzi is perfect. In the two years I had the Guzzi, no problems, no chain maintenance and a great bike to ride.

Beerman
Member
GT200, Primavera 125 (both sold), GTS300, Moto Guzzi V7 (never selling)
Joined: 25 Apr 2016
Posts: 20
Location: A small, inward-looking island off the coast of Europe
Thu Jan 02, 2020 1:01 pm quote
Yes: I had a GTS300, sold it to get a V7, then bought another GTS300 - so now I have both, which feels very privileged.

I use the V7 for trips of more than about 10 miles, the Vespa for shorter ones and to get to work. For me, the V7 is more heart, the Vespa more head, because itís relatively so practical. If I one day have to sell one, it will probably be the Vespa.
Addicted
Vespa PX 177 Settantesimo, Vespa GTS Super 300 HPE
Joined: 01 Feb 2017
Posts: 855
Location: London
Thu Jan 02, 2020 2:14 pm quote
I am never gonna trade my PX but I am in the market to add something else and I can't figure out what. I need something as narrow as a Vespa but want something more powerful than a 2-stroke 177cc. Every time I spend time looking I end up back at a 300cc GTS. The only thing so far drawing me to the dark side is a Husqvarna Svartpilen 401. The new racing 60s series Vespa looks also tempting. If space wasn't an issue I would go for Guzzi v7 hands down.
Hooked
bv350, Brutale 910
Joined: 19 Jan 2011
Posts: 350
Location: LA CA
Thu Jan 02, 2020 2:48 pm quote
why not both?

My brother (not active on the board) has a Guzzi + a bv350. He currently rides neither lol.
Member
LX 125 i-Get
Joined: 05 Aug 2019
Posts: 19
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Thu Jan 02, 2020 7:29 pm quote
Bill Dog wrote:
I always lusted after a Moto Guzzi 850 Le Mans.

There's no fat on that bike at all.

Bill x
It's funny when you say that bike has no fat at all, but when I search it on the net, it all make sense. It has no fairing whatsoever, all muscle with that big ass engine.

About the topic, I always dream about having sport bikes. When I was younger, I always want to get Honda CB 100 and get it customized to become cafe racer, but the money I save always used up to any other more necessary things.

Now I got the LX, I couldn't ask more for a bike. I use bike daily, and no other bike beats the practicality of a scooter. But it always nice to have big bikes as well, just to ride it for enjoyment, if the fortune approves.
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 3571
Location: Latina (Italy)
Fri Jan 03, 2020 1:09 am quote
Stereotypes

I feel called as a member of the people who build Moto Guzzi but instead of siding with a manufacturer in my country I go against the current; I admit it, I am an anomalous Italian and no ... we are not nationalists as we think in the rest of the world, on the contrary.
I'm talking about commercial nationalism, nothing political ...
Moto Guzzi in Italy does not enjoy much favor, it is too static, it is not felt as an evolving brand; I have never bought a Guzzi (the vintage one but it's another story), my first motorcycle (used) was an MV Agusta (used), then another (used), then A Yamaha XT 500 (used), then the my first new motorcycle and here is a funny story ...
I bought a Yamaha XJ 550 (4 cylinder) and when I arrived at my grandfather's house he (who was a Guzzista) said to me: "but ... it's not a Moto Guzzi!" and I: "but it's red like a Guzzi!" and he: "what kind of brand is it?" and I: "he is Japanese" ... he spat on the ground and said to me: "I thought you were out to buy a motorcycle and not a tape player!".
Returning to the discussion, Triumph has the merit of producing different motorcycles, with different engines and shows that it is more innovative while remaining pleasantly "English style"; I can no longer ride motorcycles but if I could I would buy a Scrambler or a Thruxton.
Banned
2009 GTS 250, 2013 Buddy 125, 2014 Triumph Bonneville
Joined: 23 Apr 2016
Posts: 2038
Location: North Jersey
Mon Jan 06, 2020 4:46 am quote
I didnít trade in or sell a scooter for a Triumph, but I own both types and if I was forced to choose to keep only one, and I was still healthy and strong, Iíd choose the Triumph. Reason being, the Triumph isnít a huge motorcycle, it can do both a trip to the local bike night and can still comfortably, reliably, and safely tour across the country if I wanted to. Yes, I know you can still do both trips on a GTS, but the Triumph will tour on an interstate highway better where the yahoos in Cadillac Escalades are doing 90MPH and changing lanes like NASCAR while talking on their phones.
Hooked
2017 BMW F800GS
Joined: 10 Feb 2012
Posts: 437
Location: Philadelphia, USA
Mon Jan 06, 2020 5:28 am quote
What if I spice things up and add a touring bike into the mix such as a BMW GS, a Suzuki V Strom, or a KTM adventure.

I am also liking the Kawasaki W800.

Soooo many choices!
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 3571
Location: Latina (Italy)
Mon Jan 06, 2020 6:23 am quote
I'm biased, I say Yamaha.
Ossessionato
Triumph Street Scrambler 2018, Suzuki VanVan200 (sold), 2015 Sprint 125 (sold)
Joined: 12 Apr 2015
Posts: 2386
Location: Finland
Mon Jan 06, 2020 6:49 am quote
zwniana wrote:
What if I spice things up and add a touring bike into the mix such as a BMW GS, a Suzuki V Strom, or a KTM adventure.

I am also liking the Kawasaki W800.

Soooo many choices!
Sounds familiar

The good thing is, if you make sure the basic ergonomics work for you, you can't go badly wrong with any of those.

Around here Moto Guzzi is the only execption, as the re-sale value will drop like a stone into a lake - but this is likely to be emphasized by our small bike market and may not be an issue where you live.

I can recommend searching opportunities for test rides. That will be an eye opening journey, worked for me and changed my initial perseptions quite a lot.
Hooked
'13 Buddy 125 Seafoam
Joined: 25 Oct 2018
Posts: 293
Location: Southcoast, MA
Mon Jan 06, 2020 7:22 am quote
zwniana wrote:
What if I spice things up and add a touring bike into the mix such as a BMW GS, a Suzuki V Strom, or a KTM adventure.

I am also liking the Kawasaki W800.

Soooo many choices!
what scooter is being traded in of your 3?...the xmax or 1 of the vespas?...what are you looking to do with it?...you said joy riding and errands...do you want comfort or performance or a little of both?...i believe adventure bikes are a little bit of both...also what body type are we talking about?...cause adventure bikes are typically tall...do you plan to hit the highway for long portions of time?...

personally i found my bonneville to be a great bike to mix comfort and performance...the key things i was looking for when i bought it was either a standard or sport bike leg position (no harley feet out in front so your ass doesn't go numb) and and upright seating position (no more hunching over like with sport bikes)...as well as being somewhat lightweight and a good center of gravity making it as nimble as possible...while the bonneville was all that, it still felt too vanilla for me and left me wanting more excitement...if i were to go back i'd be looking at the following...having owned 2 sport bikes, a dual purpose, a supermoto, a classic cruiser and now a scooter...an adventure bike seems to be the next step for me when i decide to go back to motorcycles...as was said above, def test ride them

adventure bikes...
kawasaki versys
suzuki vstrom
triumph tiger
bmw gs
yamaha super tenere
ktm super adventure
ducati multistrada
honda africa twin

sport standards...
husqvarna svartpilen 401/701
ktm duke 390/690/790
Addicted
2013 GTS 300ie
Joined: 14 Feb 2013
Posts: 609
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Mon Jan 06, 2020 7:35 am quote
I had a BMW F650GS for a year and 10k miles while I had my GTS. Adventure bikes have a whole other aspect of fun they bring beyond going from one place to another... and a large part of that is dual sport.

I was sad and reluctant about selling the F650GS...but it was too top heavy for me and my bad leg. If I wanted to get into adventure biking, my last chance would be a Scrambler, though that high pipe on the same side as the leg I can't feel is why I went with the Bonnie StT.
Hooked
2017 BMW F800GS
Joined: 10 Feb 2012
Posts: 437
Location: Philadelphia, USA
Mon Jan 06, 2020 11:57 am quote
I was sold on the Bonnie and the Triumph Scrambler and then i made the mistake of sitting on the tiger, the KTM adventure, Vstrom and I felt like a beast on them

Scooters make me smile every time i get on one. Running errands on them is awesome!!! Unfortunately living a bit far out the rides get a bit tiring on the xmax plus the US culture doesn't do well with scooter riders on the east coast. Cagers are always tailgating and coming close as if the xmax can't go past 20mph. Hoping to avoid some of that with a bigger bike. My runs include a 10-20 mile radius. Strictly joy riding most of the time.

I have 6 months and weight loss before i get to pick one out. (personal goals before my middle-aged crisis birthday)

The adventure bikes and bonnies have always been a childhood dream!
Hooked
'13 Buddy 125 Seafoam
Joined: 25 Oct 2018
Posts: 293
Location: Southcoast, MA
Mon Jan 06, 2020 12:08 pm quote
the ducati scrambler looks pretty cool too...royal enfield himalayan?
Molto Verboso
LXS 150
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 1042
Location: The OTHER South Bay, CA
Mon Jan 06, 2020 10:29 pm quote
Point37 wrote:
...

...if i were to go back i'd be looking at the following...having owned 2 sport bikes, a dual purpose, a supermoto, a classic cruiser and now a scooter...an adventure bike seems to be the next step for me when i decide to go back to motorcycles...as was said above, def test ride them

...

sport standards
...
husqvarna svartpilen 401/701
ktm duke 390/690/790
I have a 401 Svart. It's a hoot.
Definitely prefer its ergonomics and looks over its KTM platform twins (390).
The tank rack is useful. The stock mirrors aren't -- get the OEM bar-ends instead.
Hooked
'13 Buddy 125 Seafoam
Joined: 25 Oct 2018
Posts: 293
Location: Southcoast, MA
Tue Jan 07, 2020 5:45 am quote
Rusty J wrote:
Point37 wrote:
...

...if i were to go back i'd be looking at the following...having owned 2 sport bikes, a dual purpose, a supermoto, a classic cruiser and now a scooter...an adventure bike seems to be the next step for me when i decide to go back to motorcycles...as was said above, def test ride them

...

sport standards
...
husqvarna svartpilen 401/701
ktm duke 390/690/790
I have a 401 Svart. It's a hoot.
Definitely prefer its ergonomics and looks over its KTM platform twins (390).
The tank rack is useful. The stock mirrors aren't -- get the OEM bar-ends instead.
how does it feel on the highway?...does it still have the extra punch to go if you need to get out of trouble?...i want the small duke/svart for the fun factor around town but i feel like i want the extra engine for longer trips which is why i am kind of leaning towards an adventure bike...by the time i get back to motorcycles i'm sure i'll change my mind again

i was going to look up the ergos on the svartpilen to compare to the duke but they weren't in cycle ergos...the duke has a larger gas tank...6 kg difference in weight...duke has 5 mm taller seat height...svartpilen pillion seat looks more comfortable...the rest seems like style or preference cause they are essentially the same bike...the thing i would want to know is the seat shape/location vs the height and location of the bars...i hate being hunched over so how the ergos feel are big in my book...i agree about the mirrors...i typically go to either bar end mirrors or hang bar end mirrors under the bars if they will clear the gas tank (did this on my tw200 and my sm510r)...i had to put bar end mirrors on my buddy 125 too cause i hate the mickey mouse ears so much

http://cycle-ergo.com/
Ossessionato
Triumph Street Scrambler 2018, Suzuki VanVan200 (sold), 2015 Sprint 125 (sold)
Joined: 12 Apr 2015
Posts: 2386
Location: Finland
Tue Jan 07, 2020 8:20 am quote
Point37 wrote:
Rusty J wrote:
Point37 wrote:
...

...if i were to go back i'd be looking at the following...having owned 2 sport bikes, a dual purpose, a supermoto, a classic cruiser and now a scooter...an adventure bike seems to be the next step for me when i decide to go back to motorcycles...as was said above, def test ride them

...

sport standards
...
husqvarna svartpilen 401/701
ktm duke 390/690/790
I have a 401 Svart. It's a hoot.
Definitely prefer its ergonomics and looks over its KTM platform twins (390).
The tank rack is useful. The stock mirrors aren't -- get the OEM bar-ends instead.
how does it feel on the highway?...does it still have the extra punch to go if you need to get out of trouble?...i want the small duke/svart for the fun factor around town but i feel like i want the extra engine for longer trips which is why i am kind of leaning towards an adventure bike...by the time i get back to motorcycles i'm sure i'll change my mind again

i was going to look up the ergos on the svartpilen to compare to the duke but they weren't in cycle ergos...the duke has a larger gas tank...6 kg difference in weight...duke has 5 mm taller seat height...svartpilen pillion seat looks more comfortable...the rest seems like style or preference cause they are essentially the same bike...the thing i would want to know is the seat shape/location vs the height and location of the bars...i hate being hunched over so how the ergos feel are big in my book...i agree about the mirrors...i typically go to either bar end mirrors or hang bar end mirrors under the bars if they will clear the gas tank (did this on my tw200 and my sm510r)...i had to put bar end mirrors on my buddy 125 too cause i hate the mickey mouse ears so much

http://cycle-ergo.com/
I have only test ridden a 401 Svartpilen, but my 2 cents based on this:
- I'm also very sensitive to the riding position and can't take much leaning forward. To my taste, Svartpilen had a tad too forward leaning riding position...
-... that said, for those who can take it, it is still quite normal "sporty" riding position...
-...and that bike really is quite a pack of fun It has a very sharp steering, it is very light, turns super eagerly and that engine is just perfect for curves and varying speeds!
- It accelerated to ~50 mph crisply, but to me it did not feel like a long distance cruising bike. Mayby capable, but not really made for that?
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Kitted Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 7057
Location: Downtown Toronto
Tue Jan 07, 2020 8:51 am quote
TBH I like both rides but maybe lean towards Triumph though BMW has a good cafe racer now and I love their old ones. IF I were to pick something like this up I'd look for an old BMW R90S . Retirement isn't "that" far away and then I can add to the corral.

r90-780x520.jpg

Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 3571
Location: Latina (Italy)
Tue Jan 07, 2020 9:22 am quote
Right ... you miss a vintage motorcycle that is also almost modern; in addition to the R90S you can add a sidecar that would be fine.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Kitted Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 7057
Location: Downtown Toronto
Tue Jan 07, 2020 9:28 am quote
Attila wrote:
Right ... you miss a vintage motorcycle that is also almost modern; in addition to the R90S you can add a sidecar that would be fine.
Nah. I prefer sidecars and bikes specially made for them. A sidecar without a reverse gear would be a pain and I see need for more than one though I like Vespas with them. Light enough to duck walk back if need be. Just like only a Vespa is a Vespa only a Ural is a Ural.
Molto Verboso
LXS 150
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 1042
Location: The OTHER South Bay, CA
Tue Jan 07, 2020 8:17 pm quote
Point37 wrote:
Rusty J wrote:
I have a 401 Svart. It's a hoot.
Definitely prefer its ergonomics and looks over its KTM platform twins (390).
The tank rack is useful. The stock mirrors aren't -- get the OEM bar-ends instead.
how does it feel on the highway?...does it still have the extra punch to go if you need to get out of trouble?...i want the small duke/svart for the fun factor around town but i feel like i want the extra engine for longer trips which is why i am kind of leaning towards an adventure bike...by the time i get back to motorcycles i'm sure i'll change my mind again

i was going to look up the ergos on the svartpilen to compare to the duke but they weren't in cycle ergos...the duke has a larger gas tank...6 kg difference in weight...duke has 5 mm taller seat height...svartpilen pillion seat looks more comfortable...the rest seems like style or preference cause they are essentially the same bike...the thing i would want to know is the seat shape/location vs the height and location of the bars...i hate being hunched over so how the ergos feel are big in my book...i agree about the mirrors...i typically go to either bar end mirrors or hang bar end mirrors under the bars if they will clear the gas tank (did this on my tw200 and my sm510r)...i had to put bar end mirrors on my buddy 125 too cause i hate the mickey mouse ears so much

http://cycle-ergo.com/
It's got decent power up to 75 (MPH GPS) and some above that. Specs claim it's good for 40HP and that seems correct. Be advised that the RPM limits during break-in will make the bike seem almost crippled (and hold you to 70MPH GPS). Once you can get to the full RPM range, it'll wheelie with little effort in 1st, might do it in 2nd but I haven't tried. It won't have the "oomph" of your old Bonnie of course, but it's more than enough for freeway riding. It's not really meant for longhaul touring though.

I like the ergonomics, but I'm short (5'5", 29" inseam) and your mileage may vary. At low speeds, it's an easy reach to the bars but you are leaned forward a little bit (no worse than on a modern Vespa). At freeway speeds, the airflow balances your forward lean so you're neither doing push-ups nor hanging on to keep from being blown off.

I sometimes think I ought to drop the brake pedal (not the footpeg) slightly, since the neutral resting position of my right toe is slightly below the pedal. Not really worth the trouble though.

If you're carrying a passenger, keep the grab-rail/spoiler for their peace of mind. I've removed mine since I like the cleaner look and it makes it easier for me to get on and off the bike (as noted, I'm short).
Hooked
'13 Buddy 125 Seafoam
Joined: 25 Oct 2018
Posts: 293
Location: Southcoast, MA
Wed Jan 08, 2020 6:09 am quote
RRider wrote:
I have only test ridden a 401 Svartpilen, but my 2 cents based on this:
- I'm also very sensitive to the riding position and can't take much leaning forward. To my taste, Svartpilen had a tad too forward leaning riding position...
-... that said, for those who can take it, it is still quite normal "sporty" riding position...
-...and that bike really is quite a pack of fun It has a very sharp steering, it is very light, turns super eagerly and that engine is just perfect for curves and varying speeds!
- It accelerated to ~50 mph crisply, but to me it did not feel like a long distance cruising bike. Mayby capable, but not really made for that?
yea i never liked the upper torso position of my sport bikes and i never liked having clip ons vs a full handlebar...i may be able to deal with a slight forward lean but i'd have to take it for a ride to decide...it def seems like a really fun bike but like you said it's probably just that not really a long highway trip bike
Rusty J wrote:
It's got decent power up to 75 (MPH GPS) and some above that. Specs claim it's good for 40HP and that seems correct. Be advised that the RPM limits during break-in will make the bike seem almost crippled (and hold you to 70MPH GPS). Once you can get to the full RPM range, it'll wheelie with little effort in 1st, might do it in 2nd but I haven't tried. It won't have the "oomph" of your old Bonnie of course, but it's more than enough for freeway riding. It's not really meant for longhaul touring though.

I like the ergonomics, but I'm short (5'5", 29" inseam) and your mileage may vary. At low speeds, it's an easy reach to the bars but you are leaned forward a little bit (no worse than on a modern Vespa). At freeway speeds, the airflow balances your forward lean so you're neither doing push-ups nor hanging on to keep from being blown off.

I sometimes think I ought to drop the brake pedal (not the footpeg) slightly, since the neutral resting position of my right toe is slightly below the pedal. Not really worth the trouble though.

If you're carrying a passenger, keep the grab-rail/spoiler for their peace of mind. I've removed mine since I like the cleaner look and it makes it easier for me to get on and off the bike (as noted, I'm short).
good info thanks...i had to install adjustable mfw vario pegs on my bonneville cause i didn't like the location of the controls...check out the link below to adjust your pedal...doesn't seem too bad...i would never take the grab rail off but if i ride with a passenger i make them hold onto me and not the bike anyway

https://www.ktmduke390forum.com/forum/service-maintenance/12105-adjusting-foot-rear-brake-print.html
Hooked
2017 BMW F800GS
Joined: 10 Feb 2012
Posts: 437
Location: Philadelphia, USA
Thu Jan 09, 2020 1:47 pm quote
Down to 2017 BMW F800GS, 2019 KTM adventure 790, and the Bonneville T120 Black

Thoughts?
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