[SSR] My Survival Kit in an Altoids Tin
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Petty Tyrant
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Sat Aug 18, 2012 11:04 pm quote
Here's something I've been slowing working on and improving over the last year or so. This is my urban-oriented survival kit in an Altoids tin. These go great in the glovebox of your scooter, but you could carry it in your car or your work bag just as easily.

.




Here's a list of some of the more specific items in the tin:

Nano Streamlight - A really kick-ass keychain flashlight
True Utility Corkscrew - Fold-up corkscrew that easily fits on a keychain
Split Pea Lighter - The smallest lighter I've ever found, and very well built
Leatherman Squirt PS4 - Possibly the smallest Leatherman with pliers

Last edited by jess on Sat Aug 05, 2017 4:58 am; edited 7 times in total
The Host with the Toast
Joined: 13 Jun 2008
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Location: SoCal
Sat Aug 18, 2012 11:34 pm quote
Very cool, I have the flashlight too I use it at work on a key holder its very bright.
Hooked
GTS 300 Super i.e.
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Location: Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe
Sun Aug 19, 2012 3:50 am quote
In an urban environment you will find a lot of locks, so it is a good idea to include a basic lock picking set. This can help find a safer hiding place, if needed, or better shelter.

I notice that you have very little signaling tools, except for the flashlight. I would include a signal mirror for getting attention during daylight. Also a small piece of chalk to write messages on walls and road surfaces.

/Andy
Molto Verboso
Joined: 31 May 2009
Posts: 1221
Location: NC, USA
Sun Aug 19, 2012 4:27 am quote
Very good. My wife, and a lot of other females I've quizzed, have very little interest in survivalist conversations, speculations, and a collection of doodads. Among my male friends, I can barely nudge them and an animated and heated long discussion will ensue, and evolve into some ideas that make me sometimes question my choice of friends, who otherwise are quite upstanding people. Rural salt of the earth silver-haired types from all walks of life. Should the situation occur, I would prefer that they are friends.

Some have formidable stashes of stuff in preparation for what I jokingly refer to as "the end times" to get the stink eye, or rolling eyes from my wife when I use the term. Oh well, I have reached the point to where I am more afraid of the big three advanced age diseases.

Be prepared!
Resident Grump
MAC Motor, BBSHD. 30 Oct 2006
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 5:19 am quote
Maybe...Spectra thread (90lb test) replacing floss includiing sewing needle w/ thimbel for nylon repair. Industrial tin from countycomm might hold up better. My altoids tin gets pretty dented quickly and I don't especially care for the original contents.

You gave me great ideas, mine was primarily first aid until the seed was planted. An interesting twist on survival kit. I like it!
Resident Grump
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 5:25 am quote
Preferred match
Based on real world testing, and miserable failures. 20 year old box still totally servicable, I burn one once in a year or so just to check. I'll need a new box in 2016.



Ossessionato
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 5:36 am quote
Cool! Where did you find that corkscrew?

I've got a couple empty Altoids tins, and have been planning on making a B.O.A.T. (Bug-Out Altoid Tin) inspired by various threads over on Zombie Hunters, but never got around to it.

I had bookmarked the SplitPea lighter when I first stumbled across it a while back. I thought it a cool little gizmo, but didn't know what I'd do with it. Good application.

I shy away from button-cell flashlights. I've got a Fenix LD01 which uses a single AAA battery. It fits lengthwise in an Altoids tin, but takes up a lot of room. (It is usually in my pocket, anyway) I'm an advocate for Sanyo's Eneloop NiMH rechargeable batteries. Unlike most rechargeables, they maintain up to 80% of their charge over three years storage. I have around 60 AA and 48 AAA Eneloop batteries we use for almost everything.

Steve
Resident Grump
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:13 am quote
http://www.trueutility.com/pocket-tools-store/true-utility-wine-bottle-opener-twistick.html

looking for USA source. Brilliant! ingenious!
Resident Grump
MAC Motor, BBSHD. 30 Oct 2006
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:14 am quote
True Utility TU48 Twistick

Or,

Petty Tyrant
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:45 am quote
Waspandy wrote:
In an urban environment you will find a lot of locks, so it is a good idea to include a basic lock picking set. This can help find a safer hiding place, if needed, or better shelter.
Waspandy wrote:
I notice that you have very little signaling tools, except for the flashlight. I would include a signal mirror for getting attention during daylight. Also a small piece of chalk to write messages on walls and road surfaces.
In a hard-core wilderness kit, I'd almost certainly have a signaling mirror. For this particular kit (urban-oriented), I deliberately left it out. The good ones also tend to be surprisingly bulky.

One thing that is missing from this kit is a small pen and a few pieces of paper for leaving notes.
Petty Tyrant
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:48 am quote
blackbart wrote:
Very good. My wife, and a lot of other females I've quizzed, have very little interest in survivalist conversations, speculations, and a collection of doodads. Among my male friends, I can barely nudge them and an animated and heated long discussion will ensue, and evolve into some ideas that make me sometimes question my choice of friends, who otherwise are quite upstanding people. Rural salt of the earth silver-haired types from all walks of life. Should the situation occur, I would prefer that they are friends.

Some have formidable stashes of stuff in preparation for what I jokingly refer to as "the end times" to get the stink eye, or rolling eyes from my wife when I use the term.
I know the type and the perspective. Their motivations and my motivations are not usually the same, even though we're all trying to be prepared. My witty cover story is that I'm preparing for the zombie apocalypse. They can read whatever they want into that without it necessarily turning into some giant political discussion (that I would much prefer not to have).
Petty Tyrant
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:50 am quote
tomjasz wrote:
Maybe...Spectra thread (90lb test) replacing floss includiing sewing needle w/ thimbel for nylon repair.
I'll check it out. Sewing supplies are notably absent from this kit, and I've been meaning to remedy that with at least a token needle or two.
tomjasz wrote:
Industrial tin from countycomm might hold up better.
There are some really nice, purpose-built tins out there. I do like the altoids tin, though, because it's fairly innocuous and doesn't stand out in any way.

If I switch tins, it might be to a larger BCB mini survival tin.
Petty Tyrant
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:52 am quote
Re: Preferred match
tomjasz wrote:
Based on real world testing, and miserable failures. 20 year old box still totally servicable, I burn one once in a year or so just to check. I'll need a new box in 2016.
I have storm proof "monkey matches" in my larger kits (in my truck, for example) and originally had a few in this kit. I ultimately switched them out for some smaller wooden waterproof matches just for because of size constraints. Monkey matches (at least the ones that I have) are huge, relatively speaking. If I can find some smaller ones I'll use them.
Petty Tyrant
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:59 am quote
Smorris wrote:
Cool! Where did you find that corkscrew?
Obligatory Amazon link: True Utility Corkscrew.
Smorris wrote:
I had bookmarked the SplitPea lighter when I first stumbled across it a while back. I thought it a cool little gizmo, but didn't know what I'd do with it. Good application.
They're really awesome. And the full-size "pea" lighter isn't really much bigger, but carries more fuel. Depending on your kit, you could potentially use the larger one.
Smorris wrote:
I shy away from button-cell flashlights. I've got a Fenix LD01 which uses a single AAA battery.
I do too, though space was the driving factor here. I carry a Fenix E11 (my favorite, single AA) and have various and sundry flashlights in drawers around the house and gloveboxes in all the vehicles.

That said, the Nano Streamlight kicks ass. It's really bright for its size. The obvious downside is that batteries aren't super easy to come by. On the up-side, though, lithium button cells can sit in storage for longer.
Ossessionato
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Location: Avon, Ohio (25 miles west of Cleveland)
Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:59 am quote
Thanks Tom. If you happen upon a US distributor, I'd be interested.

In my pockets I almost always have the aforementioned flashlight, some pocket knife (currently a Case Swayback) and of course my Dead Bunny SC bottle opener.



I've got old waterproof matches like Tom's in my emergency bag, along with a BlastMatch firestarter


Now for techno-geeks like many of us, here's the ultimate marriage of technology and basic survival. A combination wood stove and USB charger! Too large for a BOAT, but cool none-the-less.

http://biolitestove.com

Banned
2:6
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 7659
Location: San Francisco
Sun Aug 19, 2012 7:01 am quote
the face of an iPhone works well as a signaling mirror. I use to carry my pick set with me lots of places but I found it gave me way to many opportunities to improve my skills.
Ossessionato
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 7:12 am quote
jess wrote:
I do too, though space was the driving factor here. I carry a Fenix E11 (my favorite, single AA) and have various and sundry flashlights in drawers around the house and gloveboxes in all the vehicles.
Oh, that's one I hadn't seen. AA though instead of AAA. Deb has the E01, which I wouldn't recommend. It looks like Fenix has superseded the model numbers from mine since I bought them.

In addition to the AAA LD01, I have the AA LD10 and LD20. The advantage of the larger sizes is the multiple levels, allowing it to run over 100 hours on the lowest setting. I also have the diffuser, so it can be used as illumination in the event of a power outage.

All too large for the tin, so somewhat OT for this thread.
Hooked
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 7:16 am quote
oopsclunkthud wrote:
I use to carry my pick set with me lots of places but I found it gave me way to many opportunities to improve my skills.
You should aim for the point where you don't even notice locks anymore. That's the Zen of lock picking.
Hooked
1965 Vespa 150 VBB
Joined: 15 May 2012
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Location: Connecticut USA
Sun Aug 19, 2012 7:27 am quote
Love the corkscrew. Had an ex-fiancée leave in '84 and take both corkscrews with her. Didn't discover it until I went to open a bottle of wine. Cursed her up and down until I found a wood screw and pliers. Opened the wine and cursed her some more.

Used to have a larger but similar kit for band situations (why is it that the bass player is the gear-oriented one?). Carried band-aids and tools, but also an extra drum key, guitar picks, solder and iron, mini VOM, etc. They used to laugh, but it saved a gig when one little wire broke on the guitarist's output jack and I soldered it. And the VOM explained another time why the guitarist got shocked in the mouth by his mic. (Answer: He deserved it.)

For this kit, I wonder if a couple small loose screws/nuts/bolts and a little bit of baling wire and/or electrical wire might be handy.
Petty Tyrant
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 7:30 am quote
farace wrote:
For this kit, I wonder if a couple small loose screws/nuts/bolts and a little bit of baling wire and/or electrical wire might be handy.
I carry those things as part of my scooter toolkit. I have an extensive collection of on-the-road bits and bobs, actually.
Petty Tyrant
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 7:32 am quote
Smorris wrote:
In addition to the AAA LD01, I have the AA LD10 and LD20. The advantage of the larger sizes is the multiple levels, allowing it to run over 100 hours on the lowest setting.
After discovering how much I love the E11, I picked up a two-AA Fenix E21, which is also quite good, though quite a bit bigger. Fenix seems to have hit their stride, and are turning out some very good flashlights.
Petty Tyrant
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 7:34 am quote
Smorris wrote:
Thanks Tom. If you happen upon a US distributor, I'd be interested.
You can get it from Amazon. There are a couple links above, as I accidentally duplicated Tom's link.
Smorris wrote:
Now for techno-geeks like many of us, here's the ultimate marriage of technology and basic survival. A combination wood stove and USB charger! Too large for a BOAT, but cool none-the-less.
Love those. Might go in a home-based emergency kit.
El Macho
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 7:43 am quote
I think that's very cool. Trying to put that together in Europe/UK might be a bit more difficult though. Might have to do some US shopping.
Ossessionato
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 8:27 am quote
jess wrote:
Smorris wrote:
Thanks Tom. If you happen upon a US distributor, I'd be interested.
You can get it from Amazon. There are a couple links above, as I accidentally duplicated Tom's link.
Found it, thanks. I didn't get any notification that there had been new posts while I was writing mine, so it showed up above my post.

I'll have to add one on my next Amazon order.
Resident Grump
MAC Motor, BBSHD. 30 Oct 2006
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Location: MN
Sun Aug 19, 2012 11:30 am quote
The boys store, countycomm, has a nice stainless tin about the same volume as the altoids. I think I'll try it. $2.25

countycomm 3.70"(9.39cm) x 2.32"(5.8928cm) x .82"(2.08cm) 45ccm
115ccm
altoids 3-13/16" (9.68 cm) long 2-7/16" (6.19 cm) wide 3/4" (1.91 cm) 114ccm

Assuming internets altoid measurement is correct.


Interesting search found the kit the countycomm box was used for.

WETSU Pocket Escape & Evade Kit, Mk I Mod I



A compact E&E kit built by WETSU himself. All contents fit nicely into an all metal tin with a baked-on Gray Aluma-hyde finish, serial numbered and held extra tight with a Ranger band. Each kit includes:



Stainless-steel Micro Tool

Micro LED Flashlight

Oil Filled Compass

Bic Mini Lighter

Hacksaw Blade

Straight Razor Blade

Brass Wire

Cordage (waxed)

Bobby Pin

Paper Clip

1/8" Drill Bit

Hex Nut

Safety Pin

Hand Cuff Key

Lock Pick Set

Mini Widgy Bar

WETSU Pocket Survival Kit, MkI-Mod 2



A compact survival kit built by WETSU himself. All contents fit nicely into an all metal tin with a baked-on Olive Drab Aluma-hyde finish, serial numbered and held extra tight with a Ranger band. Each kit includes:



Stainless-steel Micro Tool

Mag-Lite Solitaire Flashlight

Fishing Kit

Oil Filled Compass

Bic Mini Lighter

Matches

Tinder Cubes x 2

Hacksaw Blade

Straight Razor Blade

Brass Wire

Cordage (waxed)

8oz. Sealable Water Bag

Safety Pins

Iodine Prep-pad for treating water

Duct Tape

The inside of the tin is has two types of match strikers and the lid is shiny enough to serve as a signal mirror.
Molto Verboso
2007 Vespa 250 gts / 1961 Vespa VBA / 1964 Vespa VNB / 1961 Lambretta Li150
Joined: 02 Sep 2010
Posts: 1054
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Sun Aug 19, 2012 1:29 pm quote
I have had a survival kit since I was a Boy Scout (In the 70's). My first was a small reel to reel storage tin with the basics.
We also had a scout staff we carried to every meeting and outing.
Like the kit, the staff was a very useful tool.
It could (And did):
Used as a tent pole
crutch
to extend reach to render aid
fishing pole
using marks while making it - a scale - measurements, morse code,
wrapped fishing line around fish hooks covered by cloth strips (To be used as bandages.
10 feet of para cord to make the grip and unwound as needed.

Currently I have a "Tin" under the seat of the bike, a larger hip bag under the seat of my truck.
I'm a scout leader now and my scouts carry their 10 essentials and most carry more.
I had them make scout staffs and all use them on hikes.

Another leader a couple years ago had the boys actually use their survival gear.
We were at a scout facility so it was controlled, wounds needed to be dressed, fishing (Bait was an issue...overcome), signaling, transport of injured, shelter was constructed, fire was made and maintained.

Was it tough? For some. Challenging for all!

I was lucky enough to go through SERE school in the Navy. (A survival school for aircrew, recon, special forces) Lots of training (And abuse when captured) but skills I'll never forget.

If you are going to carry these tins, challenge yourself to use it like you NEED to before you have to!

You have the matches, great. Start and keep a fire going - actually boil water, cook food (A chicken breast will do - if not cooked though...you'll know later)
Do everything your kit was planned for when you put it together.
What did you forget?

Now maybe it's for another thread, what does everybody have as a "Personal Carry" (Things you have on you all the time)
Knife, paracord belt, multi-tool?

Whatchagot?
Gobshite Shiva
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 1:45 pm quote
blackbart wrote:
Very good. My wife, and a lot of other females I've quizzed, have very little interest in survivalist conversations, speculations, and a collection of doodads. ...
they're lying. what do you think we keep in our handbags?? pick any five random women off the street, get them to empty their handbags, and i guarantee you'll have enough equipment to build a small lunar module.
Petty Tyrant
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 3:16 pm quote
genie wrote:
they're lying. what do you think we keep in our handbags?? pick any five random women off the street, get them to empty their handbags, and i guarantee you'll have enough equipment to build a small lunar module.
This is a very good point! To some degree, perhaps the survival tins are menkinds way of making up for the fact that it's generally (though not always) unfashionable for men to carry handbags.
Ossessionato
looking again
Joined: 06 May 2011
Posts: 2080
Location: northshore, la.
Sun Aug 19, 2012 3:42 pm quote
jess wrote:
Waspandy wrote:
In an urban environment you will find a lot of locks, so it is a good idea to include a basic lock picking set. This can help find a safer hiding place, if needed, or better shelter.
Waspandy wrote:
I notice that you have very little signaling tools, except for the flashlight. I would include a signal mirror for getting attention during daylight. Also a small piece of chalk to write messages on walls and road surfaces.
In a hard-core wilderness kit, I'd almost certainly have a signaling mirror. For this particular kit (urban-oriented), I deliberately left it out. The good ones also tend to be surprisingly bulky.

One thing that is missing from this kit is a small pen and a few pieces of paper for leaving notes.
what are ya saving your underoos for, then?
Ossessionato
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Sun Aug 19, 2012 3:46 pm quote
jess wrote:
genie wrote:
they're lying. what do you think we keep in our handbags?? pick any five random women off the street, get them to empty their handbags, and i guarantee you'll have enough equipment to build a small lunar module.
This is a very good point! To some degree, perhaps the survival tins are menkinds way of making up for the fact that it's generally (though not always) unfashionable for men to carry handbags.
We have bug-out bags made by "Maxpedition". With these, us guys fearful of the "sissy" moniker get to carry a shoulder bag. They really are very hard-use bags and come in a variety of sizes.
Hooked
1980 P200E, 2012 SYM HD200 Evo
Joined: 28 Aug 2009
Posts: 463
Location: Atlanta
Sun Aug 19, 2012 3:47 pm quote
Great post Jess. Couple comments- I carried the Nano on all my key chains, but found the tail piece would not stay threaded or would turn itself on even using thread tape. I've since retired them and went to these:
http://www.amazon.com/LRI-PWK-Photon-Keychain-Micro-Light/dp/B00006I4Y2/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1345419355&sr=8-7&keywords=tiny+flashlight

The Photon's have a tiny lock out switch to keep them from being turned on accidentally, and they are very easy for quick hits of light with one hand. Love them.

Also, I carry a Fenix PD20 R5, and after having purchased a number of other flashlights I find this is the one that never leaves my person except to go through the metal detector at the airport. I probably use it 3 times a day and only replace the CR123 battery about twice a year.

The rest of your kit has some great ideas. I have get home bags and bug out bags, but have not scaled one down for the scooter. My R1200GS is much better stocked...
Moderator
Joined: 12 Nov 2005
Posts: 5145
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa.
Sun Aug 19, 2012 5:31 pm quote
This reminds me of this item, a Survival kit in a Sardine Tin, a gift I received from one of my lovely daughters (they know that dad likes the outdoors and he often does his exploring all by his lonesome) as a gift:

http://www.amazon.com/Whistle-Creek-Survival-Kit-Sardine/dp/B000O26134

Like a lot of survival tins, it's mostly a very minimal injured-lost-hungry in the wilds kit rather than a riding kit. Still, the list of contents may be helpful to those putting their own tin together:

Acetaminophen, Adhesive Bandage, Alcohol Prep, Antibiotic Ointment, Book Matches, Tea Bag*, Chewing Gun, Compass, Sugar, Whistle, Salt Packet, Energy Nugget**, Duct Tape, Fire Starter Cube, Wire Clip, First Aid Instructions, Fish Hook & Line, Note Paper, Pencil, Razor Blade, Safety Pin, Signal Mirror, Waterproof Bag.

*How to you make the tea? In the tin!
**The Energy Nugget is a fancy name for a small Tootsie Roll. Heh.

It really is a one time use emergency item. The tin opens just like a sardine can, otherwise it's totally sealed. It's designed not to be opened until you really find yourself in deep shit, so all the goodies will still be in there.

Which is why I'm going to be making up a more urban tin like the subject of this thread. First, I gotta get some Altoids.
Hooked
Fly 150, Stella
Joined: 12 Jul 2009
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Location: PNW, USA
Sun Aug 19, 2012 6:36 pm quote
Haole wrote:
If you are going to carry these tins, challenge yourself to use it like you NEED to before you have to!
Excellent point.

edit: and watch a few seasons of 'Survivor Man' and 'Man vs Wild'
Molto Verboso
Fly 150, 2006 black
Joined: 09 Sep 2006
Posts: 1067
Location: Toronto, Canada
Sun Aug 19, 2012 8:43 pm quote
Love this stuff! Reminds me of the "survival kit in a 35mm film can" we made as Boy Scouts in the '70s. We were challenged on how much useful stuff we could pack in (without any of the cool miniature stuff available today). Aside from the requisite DE razor blades, matches, band aids and fish hooks, one of the items we packed was an unlubed condom for carrying water and iodine pills to make it drinkable.
Yup, there was a time when 10 year old boys were encouraged by adults to carry condoms. Cue the perv jokes...
Molto Verboso
Primavera ET3 & PX150 & GTS 300
Joined: 05 Apr 2009
Posts: 1481
Location: Berlin
Sun Aug 19, 2012 10:04 pm quote
Perhaps you can polish the underside of the tin box to make up for the mirror? Should be good enough for signalling.

I would dip the edges in Plasti-Dip. And perhaps put two of those flat neodym magnets out of an old harddrive into the bottom of the box so you can stick it onto metal surfaces. I love these magnets ever since I used one to fix a loose ground cable on the Primavera.

I like the idea of hand cuff keys for an urban survival box. I would squeeze a pair of foam ear plugs in there as well.
Molto Verboso
Joined: 31 May 2009
Posts: 1221
Location: NC, USA
Mon Aug 20, 2012 2:41 am quote
jess wrote:
genie wrote:
they're lying. what do you think we keep in our handbags?? pick any five random women off the street, get them to empty their handbags, and i guarantee you'll have enough equipment to build a small lunar module.
This is a very good point! To some degree, perhaps the survival tins are menkinds way of making up for the fact that it's generally (though not always) unfashionable for men to carry handbags.
Looking good and being prepared is important for surviving in the concrete jungle or middle-of-nowhere. I could use a little touchup, and it seems unfair that men wearing makeup is not totally accepted, and could be problematic in my area when help arrives if needed. I have a slight phobia about women's purses and don't like to go in there even when given permission, so I really don't know all the treasures they hide.

I did find this small suede thing for three dollars at a flea market that I had to have for an emergency toolbag stored in a scooter's glovebox. My wife informed me what my find was, and thankfully it was too small for her usual survival bag, so I got to keep it. Coach.

coach bag.jpg

Ossessionato
looking again
Joined: 06 May 2011
Posts: 2080
Location: northshore, la.
Mon Aug 20, 2012 2:42 am quote
some where
buried near some flats in the town of Ramstein, Germany is a band aid box stuffed with "secret agent gear". if...not discovered, it has remained hidden since 1966, put there by some silly kid who wanted to be a secret agent man.
if that song is in your head now...good....
Hooked
Joined: 11 Jan 2012
Posts: 233
Location: Out ridin'
Mon Aug 20, 2012 4:45 am quote
If, for some reason, the "tin" box doesn't work for you, I recently stumbled upon this alternative...

http://www.meritline.com/hard-silicone-tool-storage-box-coyote-tan---p-80134.aspx
.
2007 LX 150 (memories)
Joined: 12 Jun 2007
Posts: 8356
Location: New Hampshire
Mon Aug 20, 2012 5:11 am quote
I remember when...it was suggested that you always carry a dollar and a dime. The dollar was to prove you weren't a vagrant and the dime was to make an emergency phone call.
Ossessionato
2010 ThunderFly 190, 2008 250 GTS
Joined: 29 Apr 2011
Posts: 2812
Location: Springboro, OH
Mon Aug 20, 2012 5:41 am quote
I still have the survival kit I made when I was in Boy Scouts. It's made from an old steel band-aid box (remember those) and contains a couple of candles, twine and fishing line (wrapped around the candles), cable saw, flint & steel set, small metal mirror, waterproof matches (made them myself with a bit of candlewax), needle and thread, small pencil (pens don't write well in the wet, cold, or upside down), GI P38 can opener, and a small knife.

Mine is not as compact as an altoids tin kit; perhaps I need to modernize mine a bit.
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