1959 VBA Vespa Restoration
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Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Wed Dec 28, 2016 7:42 pm quote
I am 3 months into a restoration (slow going...) and have a blog going, but will also update here as a means of sharing tips and techniques.
I have copied and pasted a few prior posts on the blog below:



This blog is one of the first small steps in scratching an itch I have had for many years now…a Vespa restoration.

Barnyard vespas are damn hard to find these days – indeed you come across more “wanted” than “for sale” ads. A testament to the number of restorers out there…

Anyway, having come close on a few, I settled on this 1959, 150 VBA in Karragullen, WA (2 hours from Perth). Brett simply had too many projects, and she had a great story. She had one owner who lived out near Cunderdin and drove her around during his courting days – attending local dances in the area etc. She turned into a farm “bike” for the kids and their mates (Brett) before they were old enough for motorbikes (last ridden in the 80′s). Brett’s mate was going to bin it about 15 years ago, but Brett said he’d take her with the aim of restoring.

Brett had too many projects and passed the baton, and I fell in love with the story, having lived for a couple of years in the area as a grommet (4-7 yrs old in Bruce Rock), and also having some family ties back to the area on my grandmother’s side (Northam).aus



This blog aims to serve as a: memorisation tool; a guide for other restorers; tips, hints & traps; as well as just a scrapbook of a vespa restoration. Hope you enjoy

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Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Wed Dec 28, 2016 7:51 pm quote
Vespa checklist and useful sites
It’s been a slightly slower process getting her across the Nullarbor. The old man was on holiday in Europe for a month and then as it turns out, Scotty’s old man’s logistics company needs the scooter in a crate….enter Dad’s ingenuity.
So a few favours have been called upon already – Scotty’s old man helping out with logistics and Dad building a crate.

Meanwhile have been doing plenty of research with a couple of useful sites:

-Vespa model history: http://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/Classic/vespa_model_history.htm

-All things classic Vespa: http://vespaguide.com

-Vespa restoration and guide: http://www.scooterhelp.com

-150 VBA/VBB buyer’s guide: http://scooterlounge.com/vespa/buyers-guide/vespa-vbb.shtml

Restoration checklist & accessories
-http://www.planetvespa.net/restoration.html (rough guide only)
-Mark Paxton's "How to Restore Classic Largeframe Vespa Scooters"
-original service manuals:
-http://www.veteranvespaclub.com/photos/550433.pdf

Accessories
http://www.planetvespa.net/accessories.html
http://www.sip-scootershop.com/en/main/base/home.aspx
http://www.scootermercato.com/
https://www.scooterwest.com/
https://www.maskesvespaparts.com/
http://www.scooter-center.com/en/classic
http://www.mauropascoli.it

and for those of you in Australia, postage seems to be ~$100USD+ for anything from over there, this is the only Aus online site I have found:
http://www.gpsimports.com.au/

does anyone know of any others?

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thanks Dad for the homemade Vespa crate



Last edited by davebaro on Mon Jan 02, 2017 1:49 am; edited 3 times in total
Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Wed Dec 28, 2016 7:56 pm quote
Ok – it’s been a while in between drinks but I got a bit done last weekend.

Having taken off peripherals (lights, panels, floor rubber and ribbing etc), I am focusing in on the petrol tank/fuel system and carbie first.

Petrol tank – I could see it was full of “oil”, but once I removed it from the body (careful to feed through the petrol tap lever through the body, and having cut the fuel line hose), on inspection with a screwdriver it was clear there was 30-40mm of gunk ate the bottom – I assume a mm of west australian red dirt/year mixed in with 2 stroke oil. Having done some research, its asn’t clear what the best cleaning method was.

In the end, dishwashing liquid with boiling hot water then guerneying and repeating the process 3 to 4 times worked as an initial cleaning method. There after I have been cleaning with metho – again repeating the process somewhere between 5-10 times.

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petrol tank removed – trying to get 30-40mm of gunk (fine dirt with oil and petrol ) out of the bottom. Ironically the layer of oil and dirt has left the inside of the tank basically rust free and good to use

Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Wed Dec 28, 2016 8:07 pm quote
a scooterwash
After a couple of weeks off the tools (a few weekends away with Sheree), had a constructive day yesterday. As a paddock basher, it certainly picked up a fair bit of the paddock over the years…I got stuck in with the guerney.

Unfortunately the state of the body is actually worse than I had hoped – especially the underside. The body will require a lot more work than hoped, and will require a panel beater as my welding ability is not up to scratch. On the positive side, all parts of the engine so far seem to be in pretty good nick, and ironically the combination of oil soaked dirt has left the surface underneath in great condition.

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Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Wed Dec 28, 2016 8:15 pm quote
engine removal
I had read that the engine removal was a fairly simple process, but I was still feeling a bit apprehensive.

-I first drained the gear box oil before removing the gear cables, as well as the brake cable.

-I next removed the selector box cover and gave the selector box a good service as a pin had come loose and dirt was clogging the spring and ultimately it just needed a clean out. A healthy dose of degreaser and a toothbrush did the job.

-she had lost her exhaust at some stage so no removal required.

-next was undoing the main bolt which was pretty badly rusted. A bit of penetrene and a heavy duty socket with a fair bit of leverage saw it undo pretty readily, then tapping it out freed the engine at it’s primary connection point.

-undoing the attachment saw the engine freed, other than the throttle cable which I had to cut to free it from the carb box

-next job is servicing the carb – should be fun as it hasn’t had a carb box cover for a long while

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Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Wed Dec 28, 2016 8:21 pm quote
carbie clean/removal
The carbie had lost the carb box cover at some stage and looked to be in a pretty bad state of repair, however the oil and dirt mix seems to have again acted as a good protective layer, and a solid dose of carb cleaner has really cleaned up the carbie and box very well.

All in all the state of parts seemed to be pretty good – flaot had no holes and jets were easily cleaned (blown out) although will be replacing parts just as a matter of course/ a carbie service- including: air filter; fuel filter; gaskets; float needle;

These models (58-59) had somewhat of a transitory carb (SI20/17 – including an air choke), and I have as yet been unable to find an identical one. There are plenty of replacement SPACO SI 20/17 carbs out there – but they are of a different design (including a fuel enrichener choke amongst other differences)
I am determined to keep the original and simply replace a few parts, but guess it will be a degree of trial and error as to whether replacements parts will fit?

Found another blog on the topic, but only seems half finished…

http://scooterlounge.com/blog/2010/06/garage-time-vespa-vba-early-series.html

Any tips much appreciated!

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Carb box cover missing – replaced with plenty of dirt…

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carbie pulled out, fuel banjo and chinaman’s hat (fuel filter) removed

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The bowl had oil at the bottom of it (as opposed to dried residue) – a win

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difficult to see, but slight scoring in the float needle – will need replacing

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throttle slide in reasonable nick although slight cracking on the left hand side – will replace.

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the dissambled and cleaned carb

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and reassembled – now just need to order replacement parts

Hooked
CUTDOWN PX200.1978 YAMAHA DT 125
Joined: 10 Dec 2016
Posts: 285
Location: southwestau
Sat Dec 31, 2016 8:03 pm quote
looks fairly straight, not a bad base.


can i offer some advice.? on your new parts list you have a few things that will be poor quality and or fit.

new speedo, the old one is rebuildable and will look and fit much better than any new replacement

new seat, just rebuild the old one

new tail light, the old one is rebuildable and will look much better than the pretty ordinary new ones

chrome centre stand, the vba uses single hole in the floorboard and an alloy bracket unlike future models.then again yours may have already been modified.

indicators, this is not necassary until after 1973 in australia

newpiston, i recomend you use a flat top piston instead of the original deflecter style one

four speed gears, sure its possible,,,if you want a gear changer handle bar with 4 numbers beware this is a gs160/vgla/b part and nos can be pricey but the reproduction ones are crap.(i may have a spare cant remember)


try carters classics in s.a for hard to find parts. and ive got a few vba vna vgla wrecks in the shed pm if you want second hand stuff.


cheers good luck
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 7097
Location: Victoria, Australia
Sun Jan 01, 2017 1:46 am quote
Looks like a nice project.

Josh is right about some of the parts on your list... a large number of replacement parts require somewhere between a bit and a lot of modification to fit.

The odd thing is, you want to replace some fairly visible bits such as nuts & bolts with new stainless (which will be very obvious) but you're 'determined to keep the original carb' which is hidden. That doesn't really make sense if you are doing a restoration. You should be careful that the end product doesn't end up looking like a bodge and devalue the project.
Bodgespotting

The 10" conversion you are contemplating is a big no no for a restoration as you'll find in the above topic.

This place tends to be one of the best sources of correct parts, but also one of the most expensive -
http://www.mauropascoli.it/index.php

Good luck, looking forward to seeing where this goes.
Hooked
CUTDOWN PX200.1978 YAMAHA DT 125
Joined: 10 Dec 2016
Posts: 285
Location: southwestau
Sun Jan 01, 2017 2:04 am quote
Ginch wrote:
Looks like a nice project.

Josh is right about some of the parts on your list... a large number of replacement parts require somewhere between a bit and a lot of modification to fit.

The odd thing is, you want to replace some fairly visible bits such as nuts & bolts with new stainless (which will be very obvious) but you're 'determined to keep the original carb' which is hidden. That doesn't really make sense if you are doing a restoration. You should be careful that the end product doesn't end up looking like a bodge and devalue the project.
Bodgespotting

The 10" conversion you are contemplating is a big no no for a restoration as you'll find in the above topic.

This place tends to be one of the best sources of correct parts, but also one of the most expensive -
http://www.mauropascoli.it/index.php

Good luck, looking forward to seeing where this goes.
10 ich as well,, oh man dude needs to stop looking at gumtree

Last edited by joshbangbang on Sun Jan 01, 2017 6:23 pm; edited 1 time in total
Hooked
GTS250ie ET4 VBA1T
Joined: 30 Jul 2008
Posts: 122
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Sun Jan 01, 2017 4:50 pm quote
Great project! I agree with the advice the others are giving you. Definitely keep the original tail light. I started with a modern replacement on mine and it was chrome and terrible. Then tried an Indian one which looked like the original but was the wrong size and did not fit the shape of the rear panel.
Finally acquired an original which are rare and expensive. I repainted it and am very happy with it now.
If you need the fittings and glass, the part numbers from Mauro Pascoli when I obtained mine were:-
F6490
F6500-4
F6513
G0925
All a little expensive but you would be happy with the end result.
I've added a photo of mine.
If you are not comfortable with rebuilding the speedometer yourself then Steve King who can be contacted at steve@speedoking.com does an excellent job.

VBA Tail Light.jpg

Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Mon Jan 02, 2017 12:41 am quote
Very appreciative for the tips, all.
Apologies - my comments and the "to do" list do seem contradictory - I found the list during some very initial research over 6 months ago, but am now using "how to restore classic large frame vespa scooters" (Mark Paxton) and service manuals as guides - both recommended for any other novices out there like me...

May amend/remove the to do list to avoid confusion. But am aiming to keep this scoot original wherever possible.

Anyway - cheers for all the tips - plenty of on the job learning.
Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Sun Jan 29, 2017 2:47 am quote
Cylinder and flywheel removal
Carbie parts have been ordered- GPS Imports the source.

Have also removed the carb air box and cleaned that up.

Meanwhile- just started on the engine.
Will need to order a cylinder head cowl – she lost hers at some stage.
Cylinder head was relatively easy to remove and to the untrained eye, the head looks not too bad. Cleaned up with a plastic scraper, degreaser, toothbrush and a cloth. Final treatment with fine wet and dry and penetrating oil – to come.

The barrel came off readily easily. Doesn’t immediately appear to be any barrel scoring, however does appear to be some tiny patches of surface rust- will need an expert opinion.

Also evidence of some water in the barrel- may have got in through the exhaust outlet (was missing an exhaust)

Need to buy some circlip pliers to remove the piston (pin). In the meantime, took the flywheel cover off- in a pretty bad state of repair. Also- only three nuts (one longer)- some with split washers- some without.

Middle cover – covering centre but missing- needs replacing.

Fly wheel removed- nuts were not particularly tight at all.

Fly wheel nut was tight! Had to put a screwdriver through the condrod pin hole (while protecting the case with cardboard) while undoing the flywheel nut. This older model has a self extracting fly wheel (circlip present) – so no puller required. The nut initially loosened after some penetrene and came loose on the thread, then tightened again as it started pulling the fly wheel – leverage (large socket shaft) required.

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cleaned up carbie box – shouldn’t need to replace anything other than the gaskets

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no pockmarks and surprisingly little carbon deposit on the cylinder head – it cleaned up well

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there was a lot of carbon deposit on the piston though – especially in contrast to the cylinder head- any ideas as to an explanation here?

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not sure whether it has been bored in the past, but the barrel looks pretty good – although evidence of small surface rust

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plenty of carbon deposited in the exhaust outlet – will get some carb cleaner onto it

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flywheel removed

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nut cover missing – need a replacement

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timing mark was clear and lined up, but added a few to be safe

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stator plate removed – and crankshaft woodruff key to be replaced

Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Sun Jan 29, 2017 3:15 am quote
Piston out, clutch and rear brake
A couple of sessions/weeks without an update, but things moving along… slowly. Piston out, made a start on the clutch (waiting on clutch nut removal tool and clutch holding tool to arrive), and removed the rear brake – ready to split the cases.

I got the the piston out – with a few little tricks. Firstly the circlips holding the gudgeon pin in the conrod were removed (will need to replace – these looked like they weren’t the originals). The gudgeon pin was tight, however heating it/the piston with a hairdryer and tapping it with a screwdriver worked (special tool not required). Important- refit the barrel as a means of supporting the conrod and avoid bending it, while tapping.

The piston will need replacing – still need to determine whether the barrel needs reboring so holding off on reordering a piston yet.

Also started on the clutch but was pretty limited what I could as I hit a dead end without clutch nut removal tool (still waiting on it in the post).

While waiting for the clutch nut tool to arrive, started on the rear brake.

The split tin was brittle and stubborn – will need a new one as had to bust it to get it out.The nut came free relatively easily to reveal a drum in a terrible state of repair with very evident scoring and a heap of dirt and soil internally. The VBA has only one static pin attaching the shoes to the pin – was a matter of removing the horseshoe clip then pulling on the brake lever before levering the shoes off with a screwdriver.
The backplate came off readily, however these VBAs have a castellated securing ring (reverse thread) that hold the oil seal in place. Firstly removed the securing clip, but was unable to get the securing ring to move – despite heating it up (hairdryer) and using a screwdriver/hammer….may have to buy a tool. Considered making one from a socket but the ring is 50cm in diameter.

Finally, I started on the engine studs (identified and cleaned each one), as well as nuts within the stator recess. Despite removing what I think is all the nuts, I couldn’t get the cases to split (despite some decent “tapping”). Had to wrap up – but will have a better look next time.

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Some signs of heat discolouration on the pin and will replace the end bearing as a matter of course despite both being in pretty good nick.

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Clutch cover came off pretty readily however evidence of sediment internally – gasket to be replaced.

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Inside the drum – a terrible state

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scoring very evident

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just the one static pin on the VBA

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VBAs also have a castellated securing ring holding the oil seal. Despite my attempts (heating it and using screwdriver/hammer), I haven’t been able to budge it. Tool required?

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Hooked
04 Genuine Stella, 03 Vespa ET, 62 Motovespa 150S (with a P125X engine) and a 71 Rally 180
Joined: 22 Jan 2008
Posts: 449
Location: Lehi, UT
Mon Jan 30, 2017 6:00 pm quote


Did you remove the retaining clip, it's the wire thing sticking through the castellated nut and the case on the right hand side of this picture. There is a special tool for this, I used a round punch and a hammer to get mine off though. Some penetrating oil wouldn't hurt either, and a heat gun should get things moving.

Die_Wespe_Kind
Hooked
04 Genuine Stella, 03 Vespa ET, 62 Motovespa 150S (with a P125X engine) and a 71 Rally 180
Joined: 22 Jan 2008
Posts: 449
Location: Lehi, UT
Mon Jan 30, 2017 7:13 pm quote


http://www.sip-scootershop.com/en/products/castle+nut+tool+sip+for+castle_25276600
This is S.I.P.'s version

Die Wespe Kind
Addicted
64 allstate, 66 sprint, 74 primavera, 79 P125x
Joined: 10 Mar 2013
Posts: 788
Location: Maine
Thu Feb 02, 2017 2:47 pm quote
Someone correct me if I'm wrong...

I believe that the castellated ring on the rear axle is reverse threaded...


Oct
Addicted
Honda elite
Joined: 19 Jun 2007
Posts: 627
Location: California
Thu Feb 02, 2017 4:54 pm quote
october wrote:
Someone correct me if I'm wrong...

I believe that the castellated ring on the rear axle is reverse threaded...


Oct
2nd reverse thread
Hooked
04 Genuine Stella, 03 Vespa ET, 62 Motovespa 150S (with a P125X engine) and a 71 Rally 180
Joined: 22 Jan 2008
Posts: 449
Location: Lehi, UT
Thu Feb 02, 2017 8:57 pm quote
october wrote:
Someone correct me if I'm wrong...

I believe that the castellated ring on the rear axle is reverse threaded...


Oct
That sounds right.
Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Fri Feb 03, 2017 9:05 pm quote
Tks all - yes it's reverse thread and have removed retaining clip.
Am going to have another crack at heating it up (hot), with penetrene and a chisel/ screwdriver and hammer.
Worst case scenario, will make one as per this post (it takes a month for deliveries to arrive here in Aus from Germany)
How do I remove rear axel castle nut?
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 7097
Location: Victoria, Australia
Fri Feb 03, 2017 11:14 pm quote
I'd try it in the oven as suggested in that thread first.

Shipping from Gemany takes about 4 - 10 days. SIP however have a minimum spend policy (something like $100 or more) and SCK have a 27 euro flat rate shipping fee. Beedspeed is better for individual stuff. Generally 8 - 10 days.
Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Tue Feb 07, 2017 1:28 am quote
Clutch arm
A shout out – I pulled apart the clutch arm and noted on my scoot that the arm actually disassembles into two pieces (as per photo below) in contrast to what I have been able to find online (they all appear to be one component) – for eg a clutch cover rebuild on Scooter Mercato http://www.scootermercato.com/Garage/Tech-Tips/Clutch-Cover-Rebuild, and GPS imports pasrt http://www.gpsimports.com.au/products-details.php?productId=738&productCategoryId=189&subProductCategoryId=190&subSubProductCategoryId=298&Level=1&subLevel=1&subSubLevel=1.

Also, my arm does not have a separate/ detachable inner lever – instead it is connected to one of the two pieces of the arm.

Anyone know of any sites that sell this type of arm as I would like to replace the top half of the arm, as wear is evident in photo 2 on what is the equivalent component/serves the same function as the inner lever.

I haven’t been able to find anything on any type of blog or site about this type of clutch arm. Any guidance would be great!

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disassembled clutch arm – two parts which seems specific to the VBA

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wear on what is the equivalent of the inner lever – which is replaceable on later clutch arms. I can’t seem to find a replacement for this piece.

Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Tue Feb 07, 2017 1:35 am quote
Brake operating lever and selector box
Gee it’s been hot – Sunday was a balmy 39C in Sydney – not the best day to put the overalls on. An arvo surf was a good way to cool down and clean the grease off…

Am somewhat hamstrung in terms of splitting the cases, as I’m waiting for the clutch nut tool to arrive in order to while the castellating ring on the rear axle won’t budge (tried again with heat and drifting). Have now got some tubing in the correct diameter so just need to make the tool now. In the meantime…

Selector box

All in all, seems to be in pretty good nick – to the point where this may have ben serviced in the past, or this bad boy simply hasn’t done that many kms. Spent a lot of time cleaning but broadly followed the guidelines here: http://www.scootermercato.com/Garage/Tech-Tips/Selector-Box-Rebuild

The inspector lever and roller seem to be in good nick – no signs of grooves, while the teeth also look to be in good condition with no visible signs of wear. I haven’t yet removed the tapered pin holding the selector arm to the top part. Cleaned up the faces ready for a gasket

Brake operating lever
Disconnected the brake operating lever and brake cable attachment via a couple of split pins. Cleaned it up and degreased it. Need to re grease, as well as replace two O rings. Split pins could also be replaced.

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Brake operating lever in situ

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Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:26 pm quote
Re: Clutch arm
[quote="davebaro"]A

Last edited by davebaro on Wed Feb 15, 2017 2:37 am; edited 1 time in total
Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:27 pm quote
Re: Clutch arm
davebaro wrote:
A shout out – I pulled apart the clutch arm and noted on my scoot that the arm actually disassembles into two pieces (as per photo below) in contrast to what I have been able to find online (they all appear to be one component) – for eg a clutch cover rebuild on Scooter Mercato http://www.scootermercato.com/Garage/Tech-Tips/Clutch-Cover-Rebuild, and GPS imports pasrt http://www.gpsimports.com.au/products-details.php?productId=738&productCategoryId=189&subProductCategoryId=190&subSubProductCategoryId=298&Level=1&subLevel=1&subSubLevel=1.

Also, my arm does not have a separate/ detachable inner lever – instead it is connected to one of the two pieces of the arm.

Anyone know of any sites that sell this type of arm as I would like to replace the top half of the arm, as wear is evident in photo 2 on what is the equivalent component/serves the same function as the inner lever.

I haven’t been able to find anything on any type of blog or site about this type of clutch arm. Any guidance would be great!
feedback from Matt at Scooter Mercato on the clutch arm:
"Some VNA and VBA cases have those 2 piece arms. I have never seen replacement parts for those but the wear on yours doesn’t appear to be bad at all. The fact that your actuator piece is hardened steel rather than the softer steel the other clutch lever uses makes it last rather than wear out."

So may just regrease and reassemble and look to replace the o ring.
Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Wed Feb 15, 2017 2:36 am quote
carbie update
Have now finished servicing the carbie other than a throttle slide (yet to order) and the gaskets - which I'll do on install.

Along with Mark Paxton's book, Scooter Mercato also have a helpful online guide:

http://www.scootermercato.com/Garage/Tech-Tips/Carb-Rebuild_2

A problem I have noticed with my carb, is that the female banjo nut hole has a burred thread (see photo). Yet to work out what size the banjo nut is, but will need to drill out and use a cutting tap to rethread - being careful of the limited diameter I have to play with.

IMG_2837.JPG
burred thread evident of the banjo nut hole

Enthusiast
Vespa 2018 Sei Giorni & 1969 Vespa Rally 180
Joined: 24 Oct 2013
Posts: 90
Location: Sydney, Australia
Fri Mar 10, 2017 4:16 am quote
you've taken on a big project here Dave. Well done and great documentation. Enjoying watching! Thanks.
Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Mon May 01, 2017 2:59 am quote
rear axle nut tool
With a bit of help from the old man, some mathematics and his bountiful workshop, we managed to make a tool to try and remove the castellated securing ring. It is difficult to apply a huge amount of pressure, but certainly what I would consider enough- especially after heating the area up with a blow torch- and leverage with a screwdriver. Still I can’t get this thing to budge!!! Any suggestions??
And yes- have tried a solid drift and am aware that it is reverse thread.

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Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Mon May 01, 2017 3:05 am quote
engine mounts
Have been struggling for time a bit lately and has been slow going- but put a new puller to use on the weekend removing the bush and pin on the engine shock mount. Came pretty readily using the correct sized socket to push the bush through. The main mount I am not looking forward to so much…

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Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Mon May 01, 2017 3:09 am quote
clutch service


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Was all fairly straightforward from removing the securing ring to removing the plates. The corks look pretty shot, and am replacing along with the springs as well. The basket (edges)looks to be in pretty good shape.

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One thing to note- this clutch doesn’t have a brass washer at the base of the central shaft, and from the research I have done it seems the 58-59 VBA didn’t have one.

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The brass bush looks in reasonable condition, but is ideally replaced. In the clutch rebuild kit, the bush is the wrong size – too big (thanks Scootermercato!) so am looking for another that fits- looks like SIP have one.

Have the new corks and steels a

Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Mon May 01, 2017 3:14 am quote
finished clutch service
Had a few wins today.

Asa guide, this was useful:http://www.scootermercato.com/Garage/Tech-Tips/Large-Frame-Clutch-Rebuild; as was Paxton’s book.

Having soaked the new corks in steering fluid for a couple of days, was time to reassemble the clutch.

Firstly degreased all parts – was some evidence of very fine metallic wear – as to be expected. All parts in fair condition. May replace the brass bush in etc future – of I oder one that is the correct size (the one provided in the scooter mercato VBA engine overhaul pack isn’t fit – too big).
Was firstly careful to make sure the (new) springs were in place – i.e. “locked” in to their recessions . Did this by turning the base plate upside down and positioning them before putting the basket on top.
then compressed using the compression tool, at this point, would have added the brass washer – but mine and hence I assume VBAs don’t have one. Dropped the drive gear on before dropping the respective plates on in their required order.
Of note, again the kit came with an incorrect piece. The top plate had hooked edges (picture two below), however these didn’t fit around the basket of the wall – so I took to them with a grinder and file.
Lastly inserted the circle (same one – just cleaned it up).

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Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Mon May 01, 2017 3:15 am quote
damn castellated nut!
This thing has caused me a lot of grief and has held things up – a lot. Today, finally, after a fourth attempt, I got it to budge. Not sure exactly what was different today, but the following came into the equation: I found a replacement castellated nut (gave me confidence that if I destroyed this one – could replace it); I had applied (another) liberal dose of penetrene the day before; applied the blow torch for even longer than the prior two times – probably for about a minute; and I felt more more comfortable with a rubber hammer. With a solid drift – I got the thing to budge. Basically was a lot of gunk, sand and grit and required a continued drift in conjunction with using the tool, to get it off completely. A big win!

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Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Mon May 01, 2017 3:20 am quote
splitting the cases
Well that was tough- and three hours of work.

Guest update on location from the farm.

Was well aware that the VBA had a tough flywheel bearing and heating was required. But a number of other obstacles along the way:

A pin through the cases just near the oil plug needed removing (hadn’t read about this anywhere)- came out pretty readily with a punch though
The cases parted millimetre by millitre by hearing the beating, tapping on the flywheel case and on the opposite side on the tab. This was VERY slow going and it appeared to be pivoting/stuck on the stud nearest to the kickstart spline.
It turns out this stud was the greatest source of resistance to splitting them as oppposed to the bearing.
In this repetitive process of heating (bearing and stud), tapping the flywheel case (rubber mallet) and hitting the tab- I snapped the tab off.
What eventually did the job was jamming progressively wider feeler gauges in between the cases around the stud as I repeated the above process.
Eventually- it came. A heads up to the celebrity apprentices and their help. Dad- all the way from Perth.

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Punching out the pin right near the oil plug

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The cracked tab- simply hit it one too many times. If I ever do need to split the cases again- will need to use the specialised tool, as this is ireeperable.

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The corroded/stuck nut. Had to keep jamming the feeler gauges in around it during tapping, otherwise the cases would just pivot at that point.

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Celebrity apprentices- Dad and Nugget with the job done

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Everything looks in surprisingly good nick

Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Tue May 30, 2017 1:56 am quote
engine stripped
backdated to April 23:

Having split the cases, was a pretty productive day today, getting the Cush drive, rear axle and crankshaft out. All in all, I am stoked at the state of the engine- even though it is 58 years old, I guess it has spent a lot of the last 40 years not doing much.

Firstly removed the kickstart. Pretty simple process in the VBA (there is no loose spring – the “spring” which applies pressure to the kickstart quadrant is fixed to the casing so nothing glass out as you get the cases apart)- the kickstart gear pulls off the shaft, while the spring is readily prised back with a set of multi-grips (picture 2 below). All teeth in a great state of repair.

The axle came free after a couple of taps with a block of timber (still coming to terms with how much grief that castellated nut gave me!)

I think I had previously removed the nut and tab washer (check this), but the primary drive pushed through no worries- and again- all teeth/gears look in great knick- still deciding whether I’ll service the cush drive – any recommendation here? Needle bearings simply pop out and the shaft/cush drive is manoeuvred out, before the drive pulls out from within the Cush drive

The crank came pretty readily too. A small degree of heat to the casing around the drive side bearing, then a few taps (block of wood) saw the crank knock out easily- both bearings attached. The tapered side shows signs of pitting and the woodruff key slot is worn. Made me more more certain that I’d like to replace the crankshaft.

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wear/pitting of the crankshaft evident here, as is orientation of the kickstart gear…and that damn corroded/stuck stud!

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The kickstart spring came pretty readily with a set of multis.

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The rear axle tapped out pretty readily (block of wood) – spline and gears all in good knick.

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Rear hub bearing tapped out from the inside readily

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roller bearings popped out of the Cush drive spline

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Cush drive with the shaft removed. Bearing stuck in there

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removing the output shaft bearing – access difficult through the selector box

Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Tue May 30, 2017 2:04 am quote
gearbox strip
Measured the end float to start (feeler gauge) – 0.006 inches.
The circlip was a tough one – a combination of the pliers and leveraging with a screwdriver saw it come loose
Thrust washer, 1st, 2nd and 3rd gear all came off readily, and cleaned up readily with some degreaser. As I have become accustomed to, the gear teeth all looked in great condition – as was the inner portion.
The cruciform pulls out readily by rotating 90 degrees (photo 4). The wear and tear of etc old cruciform evident in photo 4 and 6

The washer was bent as a tab around the slot in the selector rod for the spanner (evident in 1st photo). Made me wonder whether there had been some work done? Hence used some lock grips on the spindle (reverse thread) and locked it in place with a screwdriver – was tight, but came by hand.

The drive shaft and splines all also look to be in good shape. Degreaser and cleaned up. Cruciform reinstalled and reassembly pretty simple. Having cleaned everything, smeared oil as a protectant all over.

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Bent washer evident over the spanner slot on the selector rod. Work done in the past?. That circlip is a tough one!

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Gears pull off readily – being careful to note orientation of each

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Lock grips and screwdriver used to unscrew selector rod (reverse thread), because of the bent washer blocking spanner access

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Drive shaft and spindle all in good condition

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Wear in the old cruciform evident

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note the orientation - spade on etc cruciform slots into the bottom of the selector rod

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How’s the hot new apprentice?!? Gee she can clean a set of cases too!

Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Tue May 30, 2017 2:12 am quote
Cush drive rebuild
This one has not been easy, and has so far cost me two drill bits (I just bought a $180 set of cobalt drill bits…) and a hole punch – I didn’t know you could break those! And it’s still not finished…

A useful resource: http://www.scootermercato.com/Garage/Tech-Tips/Cush-Drive-Rebuild

The spindle pushed through readily and I had previously saved the roller bearings. Circlip pliers to remove the bearing circle, saw the spindle removed readily and the bearing tapped off that.

Theoretically now it was just a matter of drilling out the rivets. Firstly I ground back the rivet heads, before starting to drill. I found using a large bit (3-3.5mm) helped to get the head off, allowing me to lever of the old plates. I then flipped it and started on the other side with a similar process. All going well so far. Then I had to drill out the centre of the rivets – using a 2 mm drill bit. This cost me two drill bits, was very slow going and amazingly difficult. I had more luck with a thin hole punch.

Currently I have all but one rivet out – with not just the rivet stuck in it there but also the end of the (hardened steel) centre punch….

Meanwhile, I pulled out the springs and removed the inner and outer gears, removed all metal shards, and degreased.

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tapping the bearing off the spindle – came readily

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grinding off the rivets heads

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scoring evident on the horizontal faces here, but the teeth are n good condition. I don’t see the scoring being an issue?

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all but one damn rivet is out – now with the end of a centre punch snapped off in it….

Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Tue May 30, 2017 3:07 am quote
SIP order
Just put in a decent order, now that I'm getting closer to doing an engine rebuild. Am keeping the scoot as aesthetically original as possible, while increasing power and torque. From research/feedback should turn the original 4hp into a 10-12hp beast

Cosa 2 clutch - to accommodate the extra power. 22 tooth
http://www.sip-scootershop.com/main/base/Details.aspx?ProductNumber=93404100&_language=en

SIP clutch spacer - to accommodate the extra width of the Cosa 2
http://www.sip-scootershop.com/main/base/Details.aspx?ProductNumber=17650000&_language=en

Pinasco barrel and piston, 177mm - so slightly bigger than original 150mm, and an extra port
http://www.sip-scootershop.com/main/base/Details.aspx?ProductNumber=80510000&_language=en

SIP road 2.0 exhaust - suited to a mild tune
http://www.sip-scootershop.com/main/base/Details.aspx?ProductNumber=24166200&_language=en

Dell'orto SI20/20 carbie - an upgrade but no need to amend/dremel inlet hole on case (as per 24/24)
http://www.sip-scootershop.com/main/base/Details.aspx?ProductNumber=23917700&_language=en

carb box - to accommodate the 20/20. I the old box cover will be fine
http://www.sip-scootershop.com/main/base/Details.aspx?ProductNumber=23916800&_language=en

Mazzuccheli crankshaft
http://www.sip-scootershop.com/main/base/Details.aspx?ProductNumber=45131000&_language=en

new rear brake drum - old one is badly scored
http://www.sip-scootershop.com/main/base/Details.aspx?ProductNumber=23208250&_language=en
Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Sat Jun 03, 2017 9:13 pm quote
oil plug stripped - oil plug pitch?
The oil drain plug has been stripped at some stage. Was still oil in the engine when I drained it, so still an efficient seal, but the bolt neither tightens nor loosens. Have the cases split and have tried applying pressure while unscrewing - to no avail.

Have resolved that I need to drill it out and re-tap.
From the research I have done, the VBA oil plug is M8, 8mm, but can anyone confirm whether it is a 1.25mm pitch?


http://www.sip-scootershop.com/en/products/screw+m8x8+mm+hexagonal_94350000

I plan to re tap it with an M10 (or M9 if I can track on down), 8mm bolt, but want to confirm whether 1.25mm or 1.5mm pitch? Does it matter?
Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Mon Aug 14, 2017 4:05 am quote
After doing a lot of research online as to how best to approach, I had a chat to the friendly local mechanic who said he could put a helicoil in for $25. I decided to go with this option, basically because it beat other options on price, time and functionality.
I considered a tapping it out to an M10 but was worried about the area remaining to allow for a washer and nut head.
The helicoil has left enough room around the nut head for the washer and have even managed to save the original plug

IMG_3334.jpg

Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Tue Aug 15, 2017 3:05 am quote
Cush drive update
Annoyingly, the scooter mercato (VBA) cush drive kit plates didn’t fit. I considered reshaping, but decided on flattening out and then using the originals. Am learning there are quite a few nuances to these early (~59) VBAs – this youtube clip from Scooter West goes through quite a few of them
Having reattached the plates by supporting the rivets on one side (vice) and using the ball peen hammer on the other, I then seated the bearing and reinserted the circlip.

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Member
1959 VBA 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2016
Posts: 48
Location: Sydney, Australia
Tue Aug 15, 2017 3:10 am quote
engine mount replacement
Gee this job caused me some dramas – and was time consuming. Firstly let me say that I wish I had seen this Scooter West tutorial before I began:
However I didn’t, and spent many laborious hours with a drill, pick, puller, screwdriver etc. Some penetrene/ degreaser helped as well. Eventually – I managed to remove all rubber. These VBAs have a single tube for the engine bolt (as opposed to a split tube in later models), I would cut/grind off the end spacer, use penetrene liberally and use some type of a puller to get tube out. From there the bushes would also be a lot easier to remove. Am yet to buy a replacement kit and reinstall, but took plenty of cleaning internally once the bushes were removed.

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A bolt and and washer with a puller used to push out end bush

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Both bushes removed (needed a lot of cleaning internally), but the tubing is unable to be removed until one of the end spacers is removed. (single tube in these old VBAs)

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I ground back the peened lip holding the spacer on, then…

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pushed the spacer off and was able to remove the tubing from the engine

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