ET4 187 Project, NEW UPDATE
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Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Tue Mar 14, 2017 6:39 am quote
Let's bash a motor and get some power!

My ET4 125 Leader has about 35 K miles (55K km), still runs strong and there are absolutely no issues.

But, I have a 2nd motor with low mileage, and this is the one that gets built up.

Here's the plan.

1. Malossi 187 kit
2. Polini 17/44 primary drive
3. SitoPlus
4. Freshening up anything that looks like it needs it. Rear brake shoes and speedometer cable replacement, drive belt are in the plans.

No plans for exchanging the variator. I'm perfectly happy with the OEM and Dr.Pulleys that I use now. A clutch is not in the plans either. If needed, then it will have to be.

Comments are welcome.

I've read entries from Mr. 'Silver Streak' here and many others as well. Excellent info, many thanks.

I haven't seen anything lately about this, so let's have at it.

Last edited by MichaelG on Fri Apr 20, 2018 7:17 am; edited 7 times in total
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Tue Mar 14, 2017 6:54 am quote
Here a few pics of the beginnings. The 2nd motor that came along with the deal when I bought the scooter is not complete. I can use parts from the old motor, like the main cover and some small stuff.

So how about the sexy oil pan? Polished bolts too;



What bothers me are the scrap marks on the variator winged wheel, maybe a failed attempt with a variator change?



Here the polished valve cover. Makes at least for a 1/10 hp, duh....




Some more shiny stuff;



Here the head, looks to me like low mileage;



Last for now, new brake shoes, I ordered some springs today to hold them in place;



I'll keep you posted on the progress. Thanks for looking.

Michael
Ossessionato
Kymco Like 200i (Sold)
Joined: 04 Jun 2012
Posts: 2334
Location: San Jose, CA
Tue Mar 14, 2017 4:17 pm quote
Nice bits thus far. Thanks for sharing.
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Wed Mar 15, 2017 3:50 am quote
UPDATE Day 2:

I've set things up and ready to go.

Here the days project all laid out and right at hand;



The barrel sitting on a glass slab, the thin foil strip shows if it doesn't sit plane;



Looks good. Here the crankcase protected from things that don't belong in there. The piston circlip is a pesky devil and they can go sailing, all went well.
Only one side needs to be removed;



This the nasty thing, need a good set of needle nose pliers that grip well at the tip;



Now the pin can be slipped out, this goes easily;



After the piston is removed from the con rod (this goes easily), the Malossi gasket is placed carefully on the block. There are two guiding tubes that should be cleaned off and lightly oiled, then fit through the gasket into the holes in the block (they fit easily);







Now it's on to the piston. Altogether, this is a fairly tedious task. First, spray some brake cleaner on it to get the shipping grunge off, then blow some compressed air through the passages to remove any debris. The Malossi piston is pretty clean though.



Now the rings. The rings are fairly rigid and will not bend much at all, more of a sliding type movement to get them into position. We'll start with the middle ring, it's thicker than the top ring, both have an 'N' marked to show with side goes up. Slide it carefully over the top of the piston into the 2nd groove.

Malossi did not state in the directions that the 2nd ring had to be chamfered, or the edges beveled. I went to the Ross Piston website and they stated only the top ring needs to be chamfered, as stated by Malossi as well. I'll take their word for it. This would entail in other words, kind of a very slight rounding off of the ring ends. I didn't even do this to the top ring, it was already done by Malossi. It was slightly visible when viewed under magnification. I'm good with it.

Clearance has to be checked, meaning where the ends meet on the top ring.

Again Ross Pistons state the ends should come together to the diameter of the bore (70mm), plus in this case, 0.028 mm. There should be then, when the piston is in the cylinder, this amount of air between the ring ends. I checked, it looks good. Important too, between the 1st and 2nd ring, the openings should be 180 apart. So, top ring opening at 12 o'clock, 2nd ring opening at 6 o'clock. The bottom set of rings is not that important, according to Ross. I still staggered them a bit anyway.

Here the 1st and 2nd;



The last set (3 rings go into the bottom groove of the piston. First place the top of the 3 rings above the groove. Then slide the wavy one into the groove. Then slide the already available ring to the top of the wavy one, and then the bottom of the 3 rings should slip under the wavy ring. Sounds difficult. Well it is kind of a pita at first. Just the wavy ring will not fit if another of the 3 is already in place. Just won't work.

Then the fun really starts. I don't have a tool, a ring compressor, so i used fingernails and a hard plastic flat stick. Works too. More than one piston though, I'd definitely get the compressing tool.




Done! Here a shot from above;



The top of the piston shows a groove milled in for the intake valve, this goes pointed to the top. Pointing to the bottom is an arrow etched onto the top of the piston, you can't go wrong here.

So, this will be continued later on.

Thanks for looking.
Hooked
Zip50 hyperscooter 188cc
Joined: 27 Feb 2012
Posts: 150
Location: Athens,Greece
Wed Mar 15, 2017 11:36 am quote
try this Heat Resistant Clear Lacquer to protect your shiny aluminum parts from oxidation.

http://www.motip.com/products/motip/automotive/universal-lacquers/heat-resistant-clear-lacquer/

Hitzefestspray-Klarlack-400.jpg

Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Wed Mar 15, 2017 1:09 pm quote
Greetings to Greece! I love vacationing in your country.

I'll clean the bolts after installation, then spray with a clear lacquer, or paint on with a brush the matching silver paint.

Thanks for the feedback.

The shiny bolts just look great when the motor is finished. Just, they aren't worth a sheet for the long run. They do rust quickly.

Hey Dyno, I've read your posts from a few years back. Do I need to upgrade the OEM clutch?

I don't need maximum performance. This is an every day Vespa for the city, just more torque for everyday usage. I live in an area with hills.

Thanks for looking.
Hooked
Zip50 hyperscooter 188cc
Joined: 27 Feb 2012
Posts: 150
Location: Athens,Greece
Wed Mar 15, 2017 1:16 pm quote
Don't worry,factory clutch is okay!
Nice /project,keep going on.
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Wed Mar 15, 2017 1:25 pm quote
Thank you dynagrego!

You're a great performance contributor here.

I enjoyed your tuning topic from a while back, many thanks.
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Thu Mar 16, 2017 4:23 am quote
Day 3 Update

Today the cylinder gets fitted and the head tightened down. First though, the piston has to be pushed into the cylinder. Without the rings the piston slides easily up and down the cylinder. Not so with the rings installed.

I like to insert the piston in the barrel, then attach the piston to the connecting rod. The reason is, the silly piston and the rings have oil on them, not drenched, but nevertheless the oil is slippery, plus when the piston is mounted to the rod it rocks back and forth, up and down and it's really a handful trying to get the pesky circlip properly attached.

So, the variator wheel is blocked so the rod can't go up and down, and the barrel holds the piston in place as well. So lower the barrel down far enough to slip the wrist pin through the end of the con rod. Once the wrist pin is in place, this fits snugly, and with oil it's slippery too.

Now here's a trick. Since the piston is a little tricky and tedious to get into the cylinder, we want the barrel to not move up or else the silly piston comes out again....ugh! So, after the wrist pin is placed through the con rod, don't move. Don't even breathe heavily. Just per hand screw on 2 head nuts so they keep the cylinder from moving up! This will keep the piston in place too. Here the 2 nuts;



Now we can easily attach the silly circlip with ease. The oily and super slick piston will not move around. Looks like this right now;



The 2 nuts again;



And from underneath we can slide the wrist pin into place.



So, the piston is in the cylinder, the cylinder is held in place, the pin is in and the piston is connected to the rod. Now with a very good needle nose pliers, slip the circlip into the groove of the piston, around the pin.

Don't forget to cover up the crankcase so nothing falls in there;



Now shove the cylinder further down to the block;



Hold the chain up and slip the chain guide onto place. It only goes in one way. You can see inside the channel that there is a cross piece that is cast into the block, the notch on the guide fits right over it, so not to worry;



Now place the head gasket on, slipping over the long studs. This is a wiggly deal, so don't worry that it doesn't seem to fit. This is just the way it is, so no problem;



Now place the head on over the studs. It can only go on one way, you'll see the bottom of the head has again two tube-like guides that fit onto the cylinder.



Press the head and barrel down as far as you can, it'll go almost all of the way. Place the 4 head nuts, and the two long 8mm bolts through the head, and start to slowly, very slowly and carefully, tighten all of the nuts. Always go from one side to the next, crossing corners.

Use a torque wrench and start at 8 ft.lbs, then slowly going up to (I think) 20 ft-lbs. I'll look again to make sure....because....dangit! Look what I just did!!!! This sucks big time;



The sucker just twisted right off! This is not fun.

So, remove the head. And the cylinder. And the gasket.

Tap with a small punch an indentation onto the broken stud.

Drill, with first a small hole into the middle of the stud, then a somewhat larger hole with a little bigger bit. I'm about 2mm by now. The go up to about 3mm. Watch out for the metal shavings, they will stick like a magnet to the slippery oil.

Then screw in the extractor, counter clockwise, until the idiotic cheap-A stud starts to unscrew itself out of the silly block. Not too much fun here folks. By the way, this is the 4th stud that has broken with this engine! One on the timing chain wheel at the cam, two on the bottom of the drive train cover.

Here the extractor in place and it's biting and the stud is coming out;



A little more;



Done!



To be honest, I'm not sure if I have to replace all 4 studs or not. I'll find out, but I don't think so.

Sigh, more later on.

Thanks for looking.

I ordered 4 more studs, and new head nuts. Maybe they're here tomorrow.
Hooked
Zip50 hyperscooter 188cc
Joined: 27 Feb 2012
Posts: 150
Location: Athens,Greece
Thu Mar 16, 2017 11:55 am quote
maybe ,that's an easier way for broken studs:
Using a pair of spanners, twist the two nuts against each other with force. Now use one spanner on the buttom nut as if you were undoing it.

XR650L_770.jpg

twonuts.jpg

Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Thu Mar 16, 2017 10:17 pm quote
Now that looks like a winner!

I saw on the tube how to insert studs like this, but never thought about getting them out in the same fashion.

I like!

Thanks dynagrego, again a helpful hint.

PS: Coming up is a question about the silly decompression apparatus.

Do I just get the 2 cam end parts from a Liberty 125, and replace with these two?
Hooked
Zip50 hyperscooter 188cc
Joined: 27 Feb 2012
Posts: 150
Location: Athens,Greece
Thu Mar 16, 2017 10:28 pm quote
that's right,but:
"The only thing i blew up twice was the 80amp starter relay.
That happened because of malossi's high compression in according of removing the decompression mechanism.
I changed that relay with a stronger at 120 amp and i had to modify the contacts at the ends of the relay's wires to make it fit."

So,don't forget,stock liberty has lower compression than your malossi engine.

vvvv_66872.jpg

Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Thu Mar 16, 2017 11:02 pm quote
OK, in this case then I'm not interested in changing the system to this extent.

I'm not interested in all out performance, just more reliable torque for going up hills with the wife on board.

Thanks for the heads up.
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:32 am quote
UPDATE: New Pics

The stud bolts I ordered last Tuesday still haven't arrived. So today we'll do something else.

The Polini overdrive kit is a great project for today.

So, the gear oil is drained by removing the big hex nut located here;



Then loosen the seven 10mm nuts around the case, also one hiding inside here;



They'll loosen fairly easy so no problems here. To remove the case it may need a light tap or two with a small hammer at the flange area just adjacent to the filling hole on top.

When the case is removed slowly, probably a couple of sets of gears will come with it. Its not heavy, so don't worry. Here's a look;



These two are what we'll replace, the red just slides out, the green too, but this is heavy duty job coming up;



Here the part that needs to be separated, a hydraulic press is needed;



The hydraulic press;



The short spindle ready to be pressed;



Done. The spindle was pushed through the taller gear;



Here the size difference. The Polini is the shorter one, and looks a lot beefier too!;



Then the gear and spindle is set up to go the other way. Careful that they line up properly, we want the spindle to go straight down, not crooked;



It's a bear! Needed 3.5 tons of pressure to initially loosen the silly gear from the spindle, and a constant 3 tons to push it back in. Piece by piece;



Done!



Now a little gear oil on the shaft ends, and they'll feed right back easily into place. Here the primary spindle, slides right in;



The short gear set we just pressed;



Now slide the cover back into place, you'll have to probably turn by hand the primary spindle from the other side, where the clutch assembly is located. Easily handled, no problems here.

Now button the case back up and fill the case with 85-90 gear lube, use 100ml.

In case you're interested in actually doing this gear mod, and don't have a hydraulic press at hand, don't worry, they're more abundant than you may think. The pressing action took just a few minutes, and I don't work fast as there is no need to.

My thoughts are that you can probably just use the hydraulic press directly at the place I'll relate to you. Heck, take along a six pack of cool ones and the boys will probably do it for you! Wanna bet? Drop me a PM and I can give you more details on who has these presses. You'll be surprised. Take along a couple of these pics too, they'll know the deal.

That went quickly, I'm happy.

Hopefully the parts arrive soon.

Thanks for looking.

EDIT: 3 hits in 9 days shows there is hardly any interest in this project, so I'll refrain from posting any further progress.
Hooked
Et4 50cc (sold :,( ) Sym vs125 (for now)
Joined: 28 Sep 2016
Posts: 101
Location: Not Sunny Southport
Sun Apr 02, 2017 2:11 am quote
It's not an overly busy site. I wouldn't give up, I'm following this as it's pretty much the same process needed for when I start sorting my et4 50
Hooked
2016 Sprint 50
Joined: 26 Apr 2014
Posts: 221
Location: Ireland
Sun Apr 02, 2017 5:54 am quote
Please keep posting , I'm enjoying watching your work
Hooked
2005 et4
Joined: 23 May 2015
Posts: 387
Location: oshawa ontario canada
Sun Apr 02, 2017 10:35 am quote
I'm following attentively because I plan on doing almost the exact same myself this summer.

Please continue
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Mon Apr 03, 2017 7:42 am quote
Hi guys!

Well, Southport, Ireland and Canada have shown some interest, many thanks.

It's hard to refuse a direct plea.

So be it.

Actually, if one single member would benefit from this topic, I'd be thrilled.

Let me gather the pics together and continue soon.

Greetings, Michael
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Mon Apr 03, 2017 10:19 am quote
UPDATE:

The block studs arrived, all 4 of them replaced. Also, new head bolts, safe is safe.

Let's go back a bit. Using this double-nut method is a hit! Works great, used the method on the remaining four studs. i went back and had a closer look at the 1st broken stud, turns out there wasn't enough thread room left for two nuts, anyways, all is good now. Here 2 nuts mounted and tightened towards each other;



Here the new stud going in, the top nut is the one that needs a wrench on it to install the stud;



Here the remaining studs being loosened. In this case, after tightening the 2 nuts against each other, the bottom nut is being turned counter clockwise to loosen the stud. Cover up the bore and give it a good shot of WD 40. One of the remaining studs was more difficult. After mucho WD 40, I added a 3rd nut, and used a longer wrench for leverage, and finally all were gone.

Bottom nut being turned to loosen the stud;



All done, now clean out the sunken threads as done previously, and install one after the other. The studs go in easily, not to worry.



Finally, the cylinder can be placed over the studs and the piston can be wiggled back into the cylinder. A good tool is the Buzetti holder for doing work on the variator. This tools keeps the crank from turning, meaning the piston will stay in place. Here a look at the tool mounted, it's a brace that has one bolt to hold all in place, between the red lines;



Before the cylinder and piston are united, not a bad idea to apply some oil to all moving parts. Rod on the crankshaft, the bearings, underneath the piston around the wrist pin, the piston rings, and the piston skirt, the area on the sides of the piston but below the rings. The cylinder walls are very clean now, and only a very slight clean oil film on the inside walls of the piston.



A dropper works just fine.

Personally speaking, I'm getting a ring squeezer next time. I think getting an oily and slick piston into a cylinder using your fingers this way is kind of a nerve racking procedure. Here a ring squeezer that would probably work, and cheap. I can't attest to the quality, just an example;

https://www.amazon.com/Compressor-Piston-Chainsaws-Cylinder-Installation/dp/B00QZ8UU4C

Part Two;

Now place the head gasket over the studs, and place the head on. It'll push down easily. Torque the 4 nuts with gentle and equal pressure in an alternating pattern. You'll need an elongated 12mm socket if the bolts are the longer variety for the heads;



Then the 8mm longer bolts on the side of the head.

Now is the time to mount the weird decompression mechanism to the end of the camshaft. Unfortunately, I didn't have my camera at hand, but here a good shot of the mechanism;

http://www.sip-scootershop.com/de/products/automatische_kbr10003

Looks like a nightmare, but the parts can only go one way together. Take lots of pics while you take the things apart, it'll work.

Now is the time to check the valve lash. Not to worry, this is an easy deal, the motor is right in front of us, it's clean and everything is accessible. By the way, I have the motor sitting on a kitchen counter in my shop. The counter is 95cm high, great height for working on it, everything is right in front of my eyes and with good lighting this is really a good deal.

Now to the valves. The Buzetti holder is still in place, and the piston is set at top dead center. The chain hae been placed on the sprocket, and the 2V script is pointing right at the mark on the cam;



Here a small screwdriver to adjust the height, and a small wrench to loosen the locking nut;



Loosen the nut, and place the proper sized feeler between the stem and the top of the valve shaft. The top valve is the intake valve, it needs 0.10mm room. For now, the beginning, place a 0.20mm feeler in there, let the screwdriver close till there is a snug resistance to the feeler. You'll see, and feel that it will pinch the feeler. Good so. Then slowly tighten the locking nut, leaving the feeler in position. After tightening the nut. remove the feeler. Tight? Or loose? You'll have to do this procedure several times till you get the proper 0.10mm gap.





The trick is to be able to tighten the locking nut without changing the space. Trial and error. It becomes easy, and you'll enjoy doing it, so no problem here.

Then the exhaust valve at the bottom, same procedure. This valve needs 0.15mm, so start with a larger feeler, you'll get there.



After checking and re-checking, mount the valve cover. I didn't buy a new gasket for the valve cover as this is a low mileage motor and the gasket looks brand new. I did have to put here and there a drop of silicone gasket to keep it in place when the valve cover was put on the head.



Here the high performance polished valve cover....ain't it purdy?





OK. Next up is the further build, the fan housing.

Thanks for looking.
Hooked
Zip50 hyperscooter 188cc
Joined: 27 Feb 2012
Posts: 150
Location: Athens,Greece
Mon Apr 03, 2017 9:40 pm quote
poor man's piston ring compressor.
A piece of a common pvc drain pipe and a clamp.

P1020436.JPG

Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Tue Apr 04, 2017 7:24 am quote
Great idea!

I wish, I wish. Next time for sure.

Thank you.
Molto Verboso
1979 P150X, 1983 P200E, 1996 PX200E, 2011 Yamaha Fazer 600 S2
Joined: 02 Aug 2015
Posts: 1188
Location: Veria, Greece
Tue Apr 04, 2017 7:36 am quote
Top notch job so far. You could have put on the 197cc original cylinder from the Liberty 200. I have upgraded lots of customer's Vespa, Fly and Liberty 125 & 150 models. It's a cheaper direct bolt-on solution. Piaggio part code is: 844113. Just an FYI...
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Tue Apr 04, 2017 7:45 am quote
Hi SaFiS,

Yes I'm familiar with the Liberty 200 mod. The 187 Malossi runs and revs quicker. I feel it suits the ET4 perfectly.

Which carb changes do you recommend with the 200 cylinder installed?

Thanks for your input.
Molto Verboso
1979 P150X, 1983 P200E, 1996 PX200E, 2011 Yamaha Fazer 600 S2
Joined: 02 Aug 2015
Posts: 1188
Location: Veria, Greece
Tue Apr 04, 2017 8:19 am quote
Which carb do you have?? If it's the Keihin CVEK26, Piaggio uses the same jets for all models, 125 to 200. Never had a problem or had to play around with jets...
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Tue Apr 04, 2017 8:46 am quote
Yes, the Keihin CVK 26mm.

The plan is to just try it first, then see how it performs.

My carb knowledge is lacking, the news that the Keihin 26 is OK, thrills me!

Many thanks.

Greetings to wonderful Greece.
Hooked
2005 et4
Joined: 23 May 2015
Posts: 387
Location: oshawa ontario canada
Tue Apr 04, 2017 9:06 am quote
SaFiS wrote:
Top notch job so far. You could have put on the 197cc original cylinder from the Liberty 200. I have upgraded lots of customer's Vespa, Fly and Liberty 125 & 150 models. It's a cheaper direct bolt-on solution. Piaggio part code is: 844113. Just an FYI...
FYI Scooterpartsco has the Malossi kit at the same price as the Piaggio part
Member
Aprillia Mojito 150, Vespa Gts 250ie, Vespa wide body, Yamaha vino
Joined: 11 Oct 2016
Posts: 23
Location: Maryland
Tue Apr 04, 2017 9:14 am quote
SaFiS wrote:
Top notch job so far. You could have put on the 197cc original cylinder from the Liberty 200. I have upgraded lots of customer's Vespa, Fly and Liberty 125 & 150 models. It's a cheaper direct bolt-on solution. Piaggio part code is: 844113. Just an FYI...
The Piaggio 200cc kit also has a lower compression ratio which from what I read didn't make much of a difference over a stock bike due to the compression being much lower then stock or the malossi kit.
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Tue Apr 04, 2017 9:19 pm quote
As I understand, the 200 Liberty mod can make good torque, just the scooter doesn't perform well, coming across as sluggish and lazy.

I'm aiming for a peppy scooter adding a big smile factor.

UPDATE:

Moving on with the build now, lets move to mounting the fan housing. Four parts, the bottom casing around the fan and electrics, then the two halves around the cylinder, and a small door around the spark plug.

But first this little mod needs attending. An evaporation and fuel /air vent that lets unused gasses flow back to the cylinder head for burning. Front of the head, adjacent to the exhaust port on the LX Leader;



This needs to be blocked off for the Malossi mods and for a performance exhaust or otherwise backfiring will occur when you let off on the gas. Here the copper gasket laid out on a sheet of copper/bronze for cloning;



Traced and cut out, 2 holes drilled for the studs. The main intake hole is left closed;



Here in place, along with the original copper gasket;



Here with the small pipe attached. This pipe runs along the top of the fan housing. This will take some giggling around, the pipe is stiff and needs to be coaxed a little;



Here the fan housing in place. The big plug for the main electrics has a slot made in the housing, slip the plug into it, it will fit nicely;



The two halves have been placed around the cylinder, and fitted to seat on top of the fan housing. Again, move slowly, things will eventually fall into place;





Here the spark plug door slid into place. There's a small tab on the door that is supposed to pop over the post on top of the casing. Don't worry, it's so puny its probably broke already anyway. You can lay a strip if other plastic over the door and screw two screws in to keep the door in place;



Do not tighten the two halves up yet. The sealing gasket has to go around the lip of the cylinder head. This will close the gap of the housing to the motor making for a nice closed up housing for better cooling.

The valve cover should be removed, 4 bolts, its easy. The gasket is easily applied with fingers, so no problems here;





Fits nicely, now we can button everything up;






Now with the valve cover back on (4 easy bolts)





One last thing. The exhaust studs have damaged threads. Since this area is extremely tight, and tedious to attach the muffler, we need good threads. Here the old down below;



I had to add two new exhaust studs. Using the same double nut technique, they were replaced with new ones, and 2 new copper muffler nuts.





This is the end of the motor build for now. All is prepared for the transplant. The vario and belt and case will be used from the existing motor, so these will be taken care of beginning May. Vacation time. Going to Italy for a daily dose of my favorite foods!

Be back soon for Part Two, the transplantation. Many thanks for the support!

Michael
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:28 pm quote
Drive Belt and Brakes
Back to the workbench now.

Here the new brake shoes;



Here the two springs mounted, a little tricky but after a minute or two the shoes came together;



Here the two brake mounting studs, the round holes on the brake shoes go to the top. The shoes are mounted together with both springs attached! It's the only way to do this;



Here the right half is pushed onto the two studs, again, the round hole of the shoes goes to the top. The left half is snapped upwards, then the right half slips right in.

You may want to wear some protective gloves with this deal, there's a danger of getting pinched fingers.



Another view;



Now the trick, with gloves on, just push the left half down and over the studs. It goes easily enough, no brute force is needed, just a little persuasion;



Done;



The brake line will be attached to the arm lever underneath, it hooks up easily. Notice the red line on the bottom stud. This shows the position before braking;



When the brakes are applied, the lever underneath is pulled forward, which turns the cam for the brakes shoes, spreading them out against the drum, the inner rear wheel;



Here with full brakes on. Notice how the cam has turned;



No grease or oil in this area. I'll give the pad surface a good shot of brake cleaner to hopefully make for a good contact for braking. This deal is really a simple operation, I do wish the brakes worked better though. We all do.

Next up, on to the other side for a look at the variator and drive belt.
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Fri Apr 21, 2017 10:33 pm quote
The tube hanging down shown in the last pic has to be attached to the drain plug, it's for gear box ventilation.
Member
ET4-150 ( Called ET8 here )
Joined: 14 Sep 2014
Posts: 31
Location: Hong Kong
Sun May 14, 2017 6:29 pm quote
Hi Michael.
I really enjoy the posts about your ET4 project.
Awesome !
Resonates with me, as I have two ET4's to restore.
Unable to start these projects now, but I'm always looking for
relevant posts, which I archive away. For a later date........

Your efforts and documentation are very much appreciated.
I generally only post when I can contribute something useful.

Trying to unravel the mess of wires masquerading as a wiring loom
led me to begin a project to draft one. Although NOT COMPLETE, may be
of use to you. ( 2nd wiring diagram )

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0Bx8fS6BZIrI5ZnByeXZxUG03aTg

I also had good results repairing the flexible circuit for the instruments.
Difficult but not impossible.

Enjoy the restoration work and happy riding.
Cheers Hilton

Project Scoots.png

Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Tue May 16, 2017 10:24 am quote
Hello Hilton,

Yes, thanks for the wiring heads up. A forum friend in Germany has successfully installed a Leader motor into a pre-Leader M04. Also, he added the LX instrument panel! The wiring for the instruments was a lot of work. Actually, more work than was needed for the motor change. The Leader exchange was also the 125i.e., not he carb motor.

Good luck with your restorations, and hopefully you show pics here on our forum!

Greetings to Hong Kong, and thank you for looking and posting a reply.

Michael
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Fri May 26, 2017 2:01 pm quote
I'd like to finish this project topic.

I added the Dr. Pulley sliders, I chose the 9g. variety. Also added a new Malossi drive belt as I've read often these are good for this application.

Pulling the motor out is not all that difficult, further info can be readily found, YouTube for instance. All along I was working with a spotless motor, removing the old turd was a filthy experience.

So, the new motor is installed and all hooked up. I found the most difficult part was the silly big fat spring on the left side. After some practice and persuasion, it went easily. The next time will be a very quick maneuver. Also lining up the main bolt to the swing arm was a little testy, again though, some patience and it goes easily as well.

All hooked up, the tank has enough high octane (please, no weak swill with this motor), the battery is charged. I took a real deep breath, and the starter only grunted and didn't complete a turn.

Dead.

After lots of bitching and cussing, I decided to jump start the thing with my car.

wow! The new motor started immediately! What a thrill. The old Leader motor did not start this well. The new 187 is a dream come true.

I let it idle for a minute or so, then shut it off. Had a cup of coffee, then lifted the valve cover to make sure there was proper lubrication. OK.

Restarted, then hit the road.

A 15 minute ride at a constant 30 to 45 mph to set the new piston rings. Then home again. Pause, then check the oil in the pan. OK. We have operating temps now.

This time out a couple of uphill pulls to 50 mph. Easy. The ET4 is a different scooter now. It has a deeper sound to it, and with the Dr. Pulleys there is no weak spot with acceleration. I did a couple of full throttle bursts from 20 to 50 mph, what a thrill. The scooter hauls now.

Here the first big test. A stretch of road that I've done testing on, rural variety. The stop sign, then down the road is a speed limit sign. Full acceleration from the stop sign to the speed limit sign netted 46 mph (shown). Now, the same test shows a speed of 56 mph. That's a lot, 10 mph.

In the meantime, after a run or two on hilly country roads, speed limit is 55 mph, I can keep up and stay with the flow of cars. Great stuff!

Today, 3 days after the initial firing, I hit the 75 mph (shown) mark on the autobahn. Cruising at indicated 60mph, I can easily pass trucks now.

Bottom line is, the ET4 is a new scooter. Sounds different, accelerates a lot quicker, and has a decent reserve above 55mph for passing.

The electrical issues will be sorted out eventually, I can't let this dull my enthusiasm, and my pride for doing it successfully myself. Total cost is probably less than half of what a shop would have to charge.

I won't be updating thus topic with further mods, but will gladly answer any questions or replies that may pop up.

Do it! You can too. A wonderful way for not that much money, to have a new scooter feeling.

Michael

Last edited by MichaelG on Mon May 29, 2017 11:11 am; edited 1 time in total
Hooked
2016 Sprint 50
Joined: 26 Apr 2014
Posts: 221
Location: Ireland
Sun May 28, 2017 12:59 pm quote
Awesome result ! And thanks for posting , it's a great read
Member
ET4-150 ( Called ET8 here )
Joined: 14 Sep 2014
Posts: 31
Location: Hong Kong
Thu Jun 08, 2017 6:07 pm quote
Sounds like you are having fun.
Thanks Michael.
So happy you're enjoying the ride.
Satisfying too, as the work is your personal effort.
The best way to "bond" with the scoot.
Sounds like the performance improvements were worth every minute.

Looking forward to starting my own restorations too.
One day.

Cheers
Hilton
Enthusiast
Joined: 22 May 2017
Posts: 56
Location: Vero Beach FL
Fri Jun 09, 2017 2:08 am quote
Nice job and thank you for posting!
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Fri Apr 20, 2018 7:15 am quote
UPDATE:

Hello tuning fans, I'd like to update this project. The motor has been in almost a year now, I ride also throughout the winter. There have been no problems whatsoever, in 10 months I've ridden 3700 miles altogether. The motor does not burn oil or smoke, and it idles like a champ.

After a few months I changed out the OEM belt for a Malossi piece, it was a little bit wider, and immediately slow speed riding, like 10mph was not fun. The scooter would jerk around and run rough at slow speed. I have 9gr. Dr. Pulleys in.

Last summer, I replaced the Malossi with the original belt, plus added 8 gr. Dr. Pulleys, the same weights I used for the stock 125 Leader motor....Excellent!
I weigh 210lbs. Now this change has really spruced up performance!

Upon full acceleration from a red light, after the initial forward movement, the steering gets really light for an instant or two, the wheel lifts up slightly. I have a new shock (RMS, similar to original) installed. The 8 gr. sliders really let the motor rev quickly, the 9 gr. sliders were too heavy.

The top speed shown is 75mph. with a flyscreen. The big winter windshield allows a top speed of 4 to 5 mph less.

I'm still using the Walbro carb, but one number higher idle jet (jets are hard to find, Walbro has no more support available for this one), plus I enriched the mixture. The motor loves it! Very revvy now and feisty. I love it.

Just an update intentioned here, I can still highly recommend the Malossi 187 kit. We have a winner!

Michael
Hooked
2005 et4
Joined: 23 May 2015
Posts: 387
Location: oshawa ontario canada
Fri Apr 20, 2018 7:04 pm quote
Michael: Thanks again for a great write up. I plan moving an old 32" plasma TV into my garage this summer to have the scooterwest video on this install along with your writeup and pictures as a guide for me to follow.
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Sun Apr 22, 2018 1:57 pm quote
Thanks for the comment Duane.

You will need no other info for the conversion, it's all there to view. The video you mentioned is spot on, and the close up pics from this topic should enhance the individual stages. Nothing else should come up that would hinder success. This is a straight forward mod, no special experience needed.

Just to add, a few fellow Vespa friends from Germany have followed the tutorial with great success.

Having a feel for the use of regular tools and a feel for working with metal is essentially the whole deal.

I truly believe it will prove to be a very satisfying endeavor, something to be proud of.

PLUS....the scooter hauls afterwards!

Greetings, Michael
Hooked
ET4 187
Joined: 14 Mar 2017
Posts: 234
Location: Germany
Fri Apr 27, 2018 1:32 pm quote
Yet another small news;

Today for the first time the wife was able to ride along on the 187. Mind you, before we were married, back in 1973 after I bought a brand new Mark IV Norton 750 Commando direct in London, then rode the beast back to Germany, we enjoyed small outings on two wheels.

Small towns in Germany, and the surrounding countryside is a scooter and motorcyclist dream. I'd found a small rural road back then where it twists through the hills and was at times challenging to maintain a constant 40mph throughout the tour. Also were areas were the bike would leave the road over humps, yep..both wheels in the air and a real giddy experience. Steep rock hills close to the road on one side, a green valley and a stream along the other.

Just beautiful. Today we did the same tour on the 187 ET4. Simply magnificent.

The little scooter now handles a passenger as if you ride a 125 alone!

What new found fun! Guys, do it. It's just plain satisfying, and actually a cheap thrill.

Michael
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