1782 miles in 5 days - Scotland North Coast 500 on a GTS300
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GTS300
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: Hitchin, UK
Mon Jun 26, 2017 3:09 am quote

Hi, this is my first posting on Modern Vespa. So first of all a big hello to everyone and thanks for having me in your forum.

I recently completed my first long distance tour on a Vespa and enjoyed it so much, I felt a strong need to write about it somewhere where there are likeminded people. I tried explaining it to my friends and family and they didn’t really understand why anyone would want to go further than to the local shops on a 'moped'! Hope this is of interest to someone out there.

First a bit of story of how I ended up here. I moved out of London 15 years ago to what we call in the UK the 'commuter belt'. That is, somewhere semi-rural where you would still be able to travel into town for work on the train BUT (the key thing), the cost of housing is that much cheaper that you can afford a lot more house and garden for the money and more importantly A GARAGE FOR ALL MY TOYS .

Commuting by train meant I needed a means of transport to get to and from the train station every day. I chose a Honda Cub90 for the job. This worked OK (great little things) but they kept getting stolen. After 3 C90 thefts, I decided I had to call it a day. The trouble with the C90 is that it makes a great field bike that the little thugs can put knobbly tyres on, take the exhaust baffle out and have a great time tearing around off-road. The police seem to turn a blind eye to this sort of cr&p too as the kids just say they 'found' them in a bush somewhere. Such a shame

Anyway, here’s where the Vespas come in. My brother was moving abroad and was looking to sell his 2004 125 GTS for cheap. No more thefts, full screen and the Tuccano Urbano leg cover made this a much more civilised winter commuting experience (apart from the battery charging and starting problems but that’s another post). I really started getting into them since then. Eventually, I ended up on the 300 GTS as my daily commute which I just absolutely love (and have yet to meet anything that can beet me off the traffic lights).

The Vespa would just do the train station trips (2 miles either way) and to the shops at the weekend until earlier this summer when I resigned from my current employer to take a new job somewhere else. At a rather heavy leaving drinks session the plan (or more of a dare!) emerged to travel to the most northern point of Britain on the Vespa!!

Reading this forum and some others I heard it should be possible but the idea still seemed daunting.

The prep






The 300GTS had 8600k on the clock, knowing id be riding for a few 1000k at near full throttle, I thought I'd bring the 10k service forward to start the trip in the full knowledge that everything was fresh and clean. Here's what I did:

• New drive belt
• New variator rollers and those other guide bits
• Air Filter
• Spark
• Engine oil and filter
• Gerbox oil… not required but hey, for the sake of the cost of the oil, WHY NOT?
• Coolant flush.
• Fresh set of Michelin Citygrip tyres.

I also treated myself to one of the smaller Vespa 'touring' screens as my full screen was not certified for use above 50MPH.

In the footwell I strapped the spare petrol can.

Day 1 - Hitchin to Stirling (383miles)


First leg of the trip, setting off into the unknown! It was a weekday so wanted to make sure I beat all the traffic as much as possible so I set off at 5am and straight out onto the A1(M) heading directly North. OK, so it took a while to get used to the GTS on the motorway (freeway). Keeping a steady 70MPH was not too bad and was somewhere around 4/5 throttle and sometimes wide open uphill. Downhill I was able to hit 81MPH on the GPS (90 on the speedo) where the rev limiter would kick in. Anyone who claims to be able to go faster on a 300GTS without an ECU tune just isn't telling the truth . The thing to note also is that I am 6'6" tall. So the perfect wind brake. Normal-sized people would find it even easier.

It was the being blown about thing I had to get used to with the big lorries (trucks in the US) to overtake. I eventually did, but got a sore shoulder and neck gripping the bars for dear life hour after hour.

The thing which wasn’t great was the tank range. I was getting about 90-100 miles out of a tank at motorway speeds but the task of guessing which petrol (gas) station to pull into when the signs said e.g. 'Services 1 mile and 22miles' was aweful. Too soon and you end up putting a ridiculously small amount of fuel in and wasting time at the services, too late and you are cr&pping yourself that you will be stuck on the side of the road. I had the spare 5L can but still, at the side of the motorway unstrapping the luggage from the bike and filling up fuel would be very scary and the police would probably have a 'word' with you for being dangerous. There were also areas without a hard-shoulder which would have been a disaster to stop in. Either way, you don’t really want it.

For me a larger capacity fuel tank would be a very welcome touring addition even sacrificing the 'pet carrier' space. In fact I was very surprised to see the spec for the new 'touring' edition GTS had the same old pony 8L tank!!

Anyways, the bland middle of England faded away until finally I saw the sign to the historic borders route from Gretna to Edinburgh. After pulling off the motorway and onto the A7 the whole thing made sense. The scenery turned awesome, the roads turned twisty and full of other bikers giving the 'nod'.

At this point all the pain and discomfort of the motorway gave way to hair standing on end euphoria and shouting out loud inside my helmet. Corners you really had to plan seeing how hard you dare to lean the GTS over then full right fist of throttle on the way out. The feeling brought back memories of riding my Suzuki GSX-R 600 years ago but having the same thrill at 50MPH and not at 90-100MPH!

Here I realized I needed to adjust the preload on the shocks as I was bottoming out on the dips in the road on the rear and the front when I was braking before the corners.

Arriving in Edinburgh and then Stirling on the GTS, the A7 more than made up for the boring bit. Checked into the hotel weary, and got tucked into a few pints of local beer and reflected on the day.


Day 2 - Stirling to John O'Groats (260 miles)

After having a 'full Scottish' breakfast (including the haggis!) at the hotel I set off to pick up the North Coast 500 route to John O'Groats which is the most northern town in mainland Britain. Checked oil, coolant, and cranked up the rear shock preload by two notches.

Riding along on the A roads, the GTS immediately felt better on the stiffer rear springs. I just wish the front was also adjustable (perhaps father Christmas will bring me some Malossi/Olins fronts this year if I'm good!). The stock setup really limits how aggressively you can corner in my opinion. A bump in a bend and the scooter becomes unsettled very quickly.

Anyway, the A9 through the Cairngorms national park was incredible from a scenery point of view but nothing on the A7 borders route from a riding fun perspective. The road was almost too 'good' if that makes sense. Straight, smooth and it felt like everyone was driving on it to get somewhere and not to take in the scenery. Stopped in Aveimore for lunch, admiring the GTS through the coffee-shop window and observing the 'looks' it was getting this far out of an urban setting. Starting to feel really 'proud' (if that’s the right emotion) of the GTS having made it this far from home anf the train station so easily.

Carried on the A9 past Inverness, Alness, Tain, then Golspie. Here the scenery starkly changed to coastal and the road turned a bit more twisty following the coastline. FUN.

Soon the towns turned to villages, and the villages turned more and more spread-out until I finally arrived in John O'Groats.

This felt awesome. Great atmosphere there full of people that had travelled there on some sort of challenge. Loads of cyclists. People on some sort of car rally. Walkers … you name it. They were all there. A young-ish couple had travelled all the way over from Australia on BMW GS1200s.

Here I got lots of people asking about the trip on the Vespa and some disbelief that id made it that for in 2 days!

Anyway, original target reached. Checked into the B&B and went to the local pub for a few local beers (Orkney brewery pale ale. Really nice)

Day 3 - NC500 route John O'Groates to Gairloch (250 miles. Twisty!)


Setting off in the morning, I was determined to chill out on the mileage a bit as the first two days were a bit full on…. The plan failed. The roads and scenery was just so good I couldn’t stop.

Tight and twisty mixture of single track road with passing places and some sections of two lane A roads. Here the GTS really came into its own: Power to overtake slow moving traffic 2-3-4 cars at a time, nimble in the tight bends. Honestly, smiling all day till I blinked and id done another 250miles and half of the entire NC500 route.

Spoke to the hotel concierge on check-in about the fact I was doing the NC500 route and he claimed the best was still to come. Didn’t believe him.

Day 4 - NC500 Route Gairloch to Fort William and a cheeky detour to the Isle of Skye (280 miles)


Morning
Set off (again after my full Scottish) and straight out onto the twisty roads. Just didn’t want this to end. Just having so much fun. The hotel concierge told me about this famous loop to Applecross and I was very excited. Getting going, full tank of petrol and all the 'danger difficult road' and 'road not passable in winter conditions' etc signs full of adrenalin.

The roads did not disappoint, especially the part to Applecross. Single track with passing places, great climbs, blind summits, cattle grids… you name it, it had it. Only downside was a posh car rally of some sort blocking up the road. Ferraris, Rolls Royces, Lotus's …. Seemed everyone was out there on some sort of driving challenge. I was overtaking loads of them but it still slowed down the whole pace and spoiled the scenery.

Afternoon
So here's where the weather 'broke' it rained solid for the rest of the day. Miserable as I realised that the Tuccano all in one waterproof was really meant to handle the odd shower on the way back from the train station and not full day of wet weather touring. I was soaked to the bone (which I didn’t really mind. I mean once you're soaked you cant get more soaked right?). Visor on the helmet was doing its thing with the anti mist but the whole of the scenery disappeared. Heading up to the top of the isle of Skye I decided to call it a day. The wet wasn’t the problem, it was the not seeing anything interesting apart from grey cloud. Headed to Fort William to check into my hotel and dry my clothes.

Day 5 - Lake district and home! (520miles)

Woke up in Fort william (room stinking of wet boots and gloves drying on the radiator overnight. Condensation on the window etc. Reminded me of being on a school hiking trip as a kid). Checked the weather report…. Rain for the next 5 days! Looked outside…. pouring with rain. Spoke to family at home…. Biggest heatwave we've had for the last 3 years, temperature in London 32degrees!

Decided I'm a fair-weather tourer and decided to start heading back towards the sun. Speaking to a waitress over breakfast, she suggested stopping off in the Lake District to catch some of the roads and scenery there. Left the hotel and headed straight there.

Sure enough, as soon as I stared coming down to the bottom off Loch Lomond and then onto Glasgow the sun came out!! Felt good to be drying out a bit as my clothes hadn't really dried in the hotel. As I entered the Lake District national park, I started enjoying the ride again. Great roads, great scenery (not quite north coast Scotland but still pretty cool) but very very busy. Loads of traffic. Saw two car accidents in seemingly impossible, careless places. In short I was on edge and wanted to stop riding for the day.

Here’s where the problem was. Because it was so busy, EVERY B&B, hotel (even the posh ones) were fully booked (or at least that’s what they told me arriving with a slightly funny walk after riding the GTS all day and not having shaved for 4 days). I put the Vespa on the Centre stand and sat on it to think. The options were (1) stay somewhere random outside the Lake District and still spend £200 for a room or (2) get on the Vespa and blast it back home. I took option 2 and arrived home in time to tuck the kids in to bed and have a glass of wine with the wife and bore her with tales of the trip.

Conclusion
Would I do it again? Absolutely!

What would I do differently? Pack less stuff ( I think I lived in 2 changes of clothes and just fresh boxers/socks every day)

Bike mods: If I have the money, I'd do the front suspension mods I mentioned earlier. A gel seat cover might also prevent a bit of sore butt after a full day of riding. The vespa seat really starts getting uncomfortable after a few hours.

Engine upgrade? If you research the Malossi tunes on the web, you see people getting up to 90 or 100mph easily with the V4 head upgrade, 282cc barrell, piston, ECU, exhaust etc. I have thought about this and would NOT do this to a tourer. My reasoning (personal opinion) is this (1) to be confident to thrash a bike all day long I would like the knowledge that it is operating well inside its designed operating envelope. A 'tune' will put more stress on the components which is fine for small bursts but not for 9 hrs a day riding every day (2) The exhaust note would drive you insane on the motorway miles. In the twisties its fine (and the grumble popping on the overrun is fun). But the hours of this in your brain might add to the fatigue.

Anyway, hope that you enjoyed the account of my trip (or even that it persuades you to tour on a Vespa yourself!).

Take care, happy riding.

Patrick

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Last edited by pat_pending on Fri Jul 14, 2017 12:36 am; edited 3 times in total
Enthusiast
2007 Aprilia Sportcity 250 & Suzuki Boulevard S50
Joined: 22 Aug 2016
Posts: 51
Location: Greer, SC
Mon Jun 26, 2017 11:33 am quote
Great pictures, write-up and scenery. Thanks for sharing with us!

Member
GTS300
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: Hitchin, UK
Mon Jun 26, 2017 11:49 am quote
thanks mate! Think I've got the bug now. Mentally planning the next trip already.
Ossessionato
2006 GT200
Joined: 23 Feb 2016
Posts: 2687
Location: Moscow, Idaho
Tue Jun 27, 2017 6:23 am quote
Brilliant!

After driving thru a bunch -- but not enough -- of England and Wales last month I'd love to make that trip on two wheels. ...tho not the big highways!
Hooked
2017 GTS Super 300ie 'Sofia', 2014 Suzuki SV650
Joined: 08 Oct 2013
Posts: 427
Location: Berlin, Germany
Tue Jun 27, 2017 6:40 am quote
Excellent write-up and photos.
Keep it coming. You're helping the folks down under as they ride vicariously through you.

Oh, and welcome to MV!
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2007 LX150 2015 GTS 2013 BV 350
Joined: 13 Sep 2012
Posts: 8439
Location: Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
Tue Jun 27, 2017 10:04 am quote
Awesome first post!!

Sounds like a lovely adventure. Thanks for sharing.
Member
GTS300
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: Hitchin, UK
Tue Jun 27, 2017 10:51 am quote
Thanks for the kind comments. Looking forward to getting involved in some of the discussions. Regarding the freeway miles: they suck but really are in my opinion safely doable on the 250/300 GTSs. The small tank forces you to stretch your legs every hour and a half anyway!
Member
vespa gts 250 ie
Joined: 09 Oct 2016
Posts: 33
Location: piqua ohio
Tue Jun 27, 2017 5:59 pm quote
Great pics.thanks for taking us along
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Modded Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 5163
Location: Downtown Toronto
Wed Jun 28, 2017 2:35 am quote
Great post! Thanks for sharing the adventure with us and the pics.

I think many of us have sat on the bike with the centre stand up and have had to make the same decision. Nothing like that moment where you kick off the stand and say screw it, I'm just going to push on.

I'm sure that glass of wine tasting great! Not to mention that feeling of being home after a long trip and resting your weary bones.

Not so sure about the haggis though.... Think I'll stick to back bacon in the morning and poutine at dinner.
Addicted
Vespa GTS Super
Joined: 24 Jul 2014
Posts: 551
Location: London
Sun Jul 02, 2017 3:33 am quote
Great report, but where is this Endinborough you speak of?
Hooked
GTV-300ie Touring
Joined: 12 Aug 2016
Posts: 306
Location: Bishop, CA
Sun Jul 02, 2017 7:26 am quote
Love the trip report - thanks for posting!

Cheers.
Member
GTS300
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: Hitchin, UK
Thu Jul 13, 2017 11:06 pm quote
Gedmunds wrote:
Great report, but where is this Endinborough you speak of?
Member
Joined: 16 May 2017
Posts: 9
Location: Savoy
Sat Jul 15, 2017 9:28 am quote
very nice pics and journey!
Member
GTS 300SE
Joined: 11 Aug 2016
Posts: 33
Location: Bakersfield
Sat Jul 15, 2017 1:45 pm quote
Nice pics, great trip.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
LX150, GTS300, BV350, EN650
Joined: 26 Jul 2017
Posts: 5199
Location: Home of the Alamo
Sun Jul 30, 2017 5:13 am quote
Great trip and write-up Patrick! Thanks for the good read. You obviously enjoyed your ride.
Hooked
Joined: 31 Jul 2017
Posts: 120
Location: 'Straya
Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:43 am quote
Thank you Patrick
Hi mate,

You have inspired me to write my first post here. I have been ridign motorbikes/scoots anything 2 wheels for 25 years and honestly never seen such honest, good humoured and ego-free banter as in the Vespa forums.

I loved reading about your adventure on 2 wheels. As an ex-scotsman now living in the tropics I fully understand the magnitude of your trip. And I love it. I bet you slept for a week after that trip.

Thanks for sharing and thanks for the inspiration.

Best.

R748
Hooked
Primavera125
Joined: 21 Feb 2017
Posts: 136
Location: Thailand
Wed Aug 02, 2017 5:30 am quote
Superb report and pictures! Thanks for sharing!
The question remains why many of us seem to end up riding in the rain when making a tour.
Okay, Scotland is predictable they say, but it happens elsewhere as well...
Even if you would drive through the Sahara with a Vespa, you might leave a green track.
Some developmental aid organisation should be interested in sponsoring a project like that...
Hooked
GTV-300ie Touring
Joined: 12 Aug 2016
Posts: 306
Location: Bishop, CA
Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:18 am quote
@pat_pending - I enjoy making ride reports too, but the biggest challenge for me is stopping so often for photos. I really, really enjoy seeing other rides from around the world, but I realized quickly that I LOVE the riding part, but don't really enjoy the stopping for photos part.

I wonder if others who post ride reports find the same thing? I get so caught up in the moment I'm in, and think "Man, I sure do love this view" and feel reluctant to stop just so I can take photos.

I wonder if using a GoPro or other mobile video device is better suited for ride reports. Guess I'll have to invest in a helmet-cam and see if it's better at actually enjoying the ride, while also documenting it...
Moto Giro Titan
2009 GTS 250 Super Lucrezia Borgia, 2013 Ducati Hyperstrada, Little Big Red
Joined: 04 Feb 2009
Posts: 2477
Location: Carrollton, Kentucky
Thu Aug 31, 2017 8:28 am quote
Great post, lots of valuable info for touring aspirants!
Addicted
1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T / 2009 Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 676
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Thu Aug 31, 2017 9:53 am quote
Awesome post. Thanks for sharing.

My wife and I keep threatening to take a long(ish) trip on the bikes. She on her Buddy 170i and me on the P200E. I'd like to do Mackinac or something.

Your ride is inspirational. Time to start packing.
Hooked
bv350 (sold) and now,'14 honda ctx700 dct
Joined: 03 Aug 2014
Posts: 464
Location: spokane, wa
Thu Aug 31, 2017 2:57 pm quote
howdy and wow

welcome to the forum and i'll give ya about 60 years to quit posting some of your rides like that. i have done most of that though by train from lands' end to john-o-groats and over to skye and by mailboat to fort william. i stayed about 10 days in aviemoore in '75 when the fish shop was closed on monday because the fishermen didn't fish on sunday then went back 15 years later when the same shop was now open serving formerly frozen fish. drove round trip from aviemoore to inverness in the rainy nighttime as my first after dark driving on the left side. all in all you were tickling the memory ingrams all the way. we stayed in a b+b that had a sign leaned against the wall that read "weet pent". i don't intend to have haggis for breakfast or lunch or dinner or brunch or after sampling some pints of the local. got that?

thanks again and ttfn
ken
Addicted
GTS 250
Joined: 19 Oct 2009
Posts: 701
Location: london uk
Sun Sep 03, 2017 2:27 am quote
scot scooting
Hi Pat, loved your northern write up. I haven't gone that far north from where I am in London, as I've been up in those areas when I used to do a lot of climbing and hiking when I was younger. The thing is , it's usually wet up there but it always makes for an heroic adventure. Another interesting northern run for you , and probably drier. is head up the east coast, taking in Lincolnshire wolds, North york moors, Northumberland coast.When you reach Berwick on the Scottish borders and head eastward through the Scottish borderland as far as Stranraer/Galloway area. Head back westwards towards Carlisle, then take the Hadrians wall route,. then when you get to Haltwhistle, head south to Alston.. Then make your way southwards through the Yorkshire Dales, then southwards through the Yorkshire Peak District, then the Derbyshire Peak district, Then eventually find the A5 and back to your way. Lots of great scenery, castles and less full accommodation, and usually drier. I meet up with the Donkieskok group, find us on the forum currently Il Bruno, Il Donkey... A mixed group of riders. We do some meet ups and a lot of the guys and girls do expeditions. I usually do mainly Europe, Spain, France and Italy. Meet up with some of us sometime.
Cheers Gass silver machine gts 250

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My scoot in Bilbao

Hooked
Vespa PX 150 E 1989, VBB2T 1965, Primavera 150 2014, Honda Vario 110 eSP 2017, Vespa PTS Malossi 1983, Vespa Sprint V 1975 (soon)
Joined: 12 Sep 2012
Posts: 205
Location: Jakarta, Bali, Surabaya, Indonesia
Sun Sep 03, 2017 2:52 am quote
Inspiring
Great trip and writting, thanks for sharing 👍
Addicted
2016 LXV 150 ie, 1978 Vespa P125, 2019 Piaggio Liberty 150
Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 509
Location: central Illinois USA
Sun Sep 03, 2017 6:59 am quote
Wow, great photos
From the gal who will probably never travel overseas, no $ and starting to get old.. Loved your trip, and since I have been known to put 300-400+ miles on a 150cc Vespa in a day, I do know what that bum pain feels like and the issues with unloading to pop up the seat for petrol/gas, or here, trying to plan ahead as my LXV likes 93 but won't complain about 91 octane but here in rural Illinois I can find pumps with only the lowest grade and only use a debit/credit card, no service, just the pumps, 1 gas, 1 diesel, and the little card reader... no loo, but often a machine to purchase soda pop.
We try to avoid the busy interstates or 4/6 lane roads and streets but can do them. And I am not part frog, fish or duck so try to avoid that wet stuff, I need to buy rain gear, someday. Anyway, hope to see more posts from you.
Member
not yet but looking
Joined: 20 Feb 2016
Posts: 10
Location: kent
Fri Sep 08, 2017 3:31 am quote
Brilliant ride/post too,i guess the hardest ride is getting there and back.Even further for me,coming from Kent.
Member
GTS300
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: Hitchin, UK
Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:42 am quote
Thanks everyone for the great comments. Really awesome. Checking back here after a while away. Really motivated to start planning the next trip! P
Member
GTS300
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: Hitchin, UK
Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:46 am quote
biffnix wrote:
@pat_pending - I enjoy making ride reports too, but the biggest challenge for me is stopping so often for photos. I really, really enjoy seeing other rides from around the world, but I realized quickly that I LOVE the riding part, but don't really enjoy the stopping for photos part.

I wonder if others who post ride reports find the same thing? I get so caught up in the moment I'm in, and think "Man, I sure do love this view" and feel reluctant to stop just so I can take photos.

I wonder if using a GoPro or other mobile video device is better suited for ride reports. Guess I'll have to invest in a helmet-cam and see if it's better at actually enjoying the ride, while also documenting it...
I totally know what you mean. I really hated stopping too. I think I might need to experiment with the GoPro or something like that. It would be great to just tap a button on the handlebars and take a decent shot!. You've got me thinking. P
Member
GTS300
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Location: Hitchin, UK
Sat Nov 11, 2017 10:54 am quote
Re: scot scooting
gass wrote:
Hi Pat, loved your northern write up. I haven't gone that far north from where I am in London, as I've been up in those areas when I used to do a lot of climbing and hiking when I was younger. The thing is , it's usually wet up there but it always makes for an heroic adventure. Another interesting northern run for you , and probably drier. is head up the east coast, taking in Lincolnshire wolds, North york moors, Northumberland coast.When you reach Berwick on the Scottish borders and head eastward through the Scottish borderland as far as Stranraer/Galloway area. Head back westwards towards Carlisle, then take the Hadrians wall route,. then when you get to Haltwhistle, head south to Alston.. Then make your way southwards through the Yorkshire Dales, then southwards through the Yorkshire Peak District, then the Derbyshire Peak district, Then eventually find the A5 and back to your way. Lots of great scenery, castles and less full accommodation, and usually drier. I meet up with the Donkieskok group, find us on the forum currently Il Bruno, Il Donkey... A mixed group of riders. We do some meet ups and a lot of the guys and girls do expeditions. I usually do mainly Europe, Spain, France and Italy. Meet up with some of us sometime.
Cheers Gass silver machine gts 250
Thanks mate. that sounds like some good advice. Ill check out the route. Searched Donkieskok in the forum. The banter and car sticker had me in stitches! Do you still ride out (i saw lots of 'no scooter no more' next to the profile pics).
Take care P
Hooked
GTS 300
Joined: 19 Aug 2014
Posts: 267
Location: Northern Cal
Mon Nov 13, 2017 6:44 am quote
Great photos and write-up. Thanks for sharing.
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