From Dreamer to Owner, now what?
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Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 479
Location: MN
Mon Jul 31, 2017 11:03 am quote
Hey all,
My lovely blue lady is being delivered tonight (vespa super '66). I'm so excited, I can hardly stand it! And maybe a little nervous as well. All of a sudden the responsibility part needs to kick in instead of just dreaming and shopping.

So, I got my motorcycle permit this morning (yay!!), and I'm signed up for the MSF course this week. That will get me my endorsement by Sunday afternoon. Thanks for that tip, Larrytsg, cause I'm a safety gal at heart.

Helmet and face shield/goggles being selected today or tomorrow. Hard to choose and I don't want to spend $500. Recommendations welcome.

I'm thinking title transfer, insurance, and registration have to happen right away. Scooter had the original license plate on it, which will be given to me, but the owner put new plates and tabs on it. Does that mean I can't ever use the original plate? It's so much cooler.

So my big question mark for today is scooter security? I'm parking it in my 1930's garage which has no lock on it. I could put a lock on the garage doors but hubby thinks that will alert thieves to valuables inside instead of deter them. And then I need to lock up the scooter itself. I've looked at chains, cables, disc locks, u locks, Grip lock (looked very convenient), and alarms. Can anyone give me a little advice on the best methods? I'm thinking maybe 2-3 methods might be best to have available depending on scooter's location (work, store, garage, etc).

Next week I have to figure out the first steps of checking mechanical stuff, gas mixing (yep, got the helpful link), and learning to actually ride this beauty!

Step by little step, the dream is coming true. It's so so fun!

Ps: to those of you who may have read about my bawl baby behavior regarding the red Super, I'm embarrassed. I was maybe a little out of hand with my emotions. Easy to get caught up when faced with two vintage beauties at once. I'm over it now and very grateful for blue. Yes, it was the right choice!
Hooked
1980 P200E
Joined: 02 Feb 2010
Posts: 187
Location: San Diego, CA
Mon Jul 31, 2017 11:35 am quote
Definitely get a full face helmet, but you don't need to spend hundreds of dollars on one. Just make sure it is DOT and ECE certified.
Ossessionato
BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2842
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Mon Jul 31, 2017 11:38 am quote
Put a lock on the garage. Unlocked doors are just an invitation to thieves. It's too easy to open the door to see if there's anything to grab and run.

Then use a heavy chain lock on the scooter if there's a possibility the garage could be broken into another way.
Ossessionato
1979 P200e
Joined: 18 Mar 2013
Posts: 2478
Location: Lock Haven, PA
Mon Jul 31, 2017 11:40 am quote
Well, glad you have a permit and a date for the MSF. You'll have fun!

Go gear shopping one piece at a time.... helmet first, then the other stuff. You might have a denim jacket or an old leather one to start with. My first scooter jacket was a thrift store leather one. You probably want to have your helmet before the MSF class.

There are a lot of places online to shop, and some of the ladies here like GoGo Gear. I'm a big fan of http://www.motorcyclegear.com. He has a decent amount of women's jackets, and some at closeout prices. Sometimes Etsy or eBay has slightly used stuff at bargain prices.

Security? I can't say much about that. I don't commute to work on my scooter (either work from home office or drive my truck for pickup of inventory or to go postal), and I live in a very safe suburban neighborhood where the only crime is mailbox bashing and stealing pocket change out of unlocked cars.

Enjoy the learning curve.
Banned
2:6
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 7466
Location: San Francisco
Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:13 pm quote
Fun while waiting to ride:
Get some rags and wax, get to know the bike a bit better.

Security:
A small U-lock to go around the front spring/shock, and a cable will do the job in the garage as well as on the go. A lock on the garage door (or an electric opener) is not unreasonable either.

Helmet:
Everyone has a strong opinion on this, and will fight about it. I miss the days (and summer nights) of riding around without a helmet, but I will not ride without a full face now, ever! A modular can be a really good compromise between open and full face but they tend to be more expensive. In the end you will have to make the call as to what works for you.

Old plates:
This is different in every state. Make copies of every document just in case you need it later.
Ossessionato
1979 P200e
Joined: 18 Mar 2013
Posts: 2478
Location: Lock Haven, PA
Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:20 pm quote
Does your garage have a roll up door and a side door? If so, you can simply use a pair of vice grips on the track above one of the rollers as a crude but effective lock.

You'll have to look up at your DMV whether or not you can use "year of manufacture" plates. I know here in Massachusetts we can use old plates on motorcycles and scooters made before 1989, because after that date the plates are similar to the current ones. I bought an old plate on eBay earlier this year, but will wait till December to go through the switch over process.
Molto Verboso
'99 PX200
Joined: 19 Oct 2008
Posts: 1318
Location: Cheshire, England, UK, Europe.
Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:37 pm quote
A ground anchor or eye bolt sunk into the garage floor or wall, and then the best chain and lock you can afford around the floorboards is probably the best security you can get in my opinion.
Hooked
Joined: 06 Dec 2011
Posts: 431
Location: twincities
Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:39 pm quote
Go to Scooterville, they have a full selection of helmets and jackets from Corazzo.
Hooked
1974 Vespa 125 Primavera, 1980 Bajaj Chetak, 1962 Lambretta 175TV3, 2006 Yamaha Vino
Joined: 07 Jul 2017
Posts: 429
Location: Boston, MA
Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:45 pm quote
Here are just some of the useful links you'll find if you use the search function to search for "locks" and "security." You'll get better results if you choose to search message titles only.

Security
Locks
Scooter locks.
Locks/Security
Best lock?


When I lock my 74 PV up in front of my house, I use a heavy OnGuard chain and a Kryptonite Evolution lock, and I lock it to a lamp post. I push down the brake pedal and run the chain through there, and then I attach the 2 ends of the chain to my U-Lock, which also runs around my front shock. This also acts as a steering lock (I don't have the key for mine), because I lock it tight enough that you can't move the steering column at all. Then I put a cover on it. I only do this overnight at my house, as I have no storage space in my bike for carrying a heavy chain. When I'm at work, I don't lock it up and I leave it outside of my office building at the end of a long line of motorcycles and scooters right in front of a busy plaza with tons of foot traffic. This is a terrible idea. Don't do this. I'm working on a mobile solution.

Last edited by Bazziemoto on Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:27 pm; edited 1 time in total
Addicted
Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:44 pm quote
Kimono,
I have no specific advice on any of your questions. Just wanted to say I'm thrilled for you.

The next step after dreamer/ owner is rider. Just do the basic maintenance/ safety stuff and go out and enjoy your scooter. You will expand your horizons out of your neighborhood pretty quickly.

*edit* actually, I do have some specific info on one of your questions...

Checking the roadworthiness of your Vespa:
1) Brakes. Make sure that your brakes work front and rear. You shouldn't be able to move the bike with the brakes engaged.
2) Wheels solidly mounted. Make sure the center bolts are tight and the wheels don't wobble. The rear nut needs to be secured with a cotter pin. Check the lug nuts and make sure they're all tight.
3) Check the tire pressure and condition of the tires. Others may have different preferences, but I set my rear and spare to 35 PSI and my front to 25.
4) Clutch and throttle. Clutch should completely disengage when squeezed and throttle should return to idle without sticking.
5) Steering column. It should swing smoothly from lock to lock, but should have no slop.

If the bike passes these 5 steps, it is safe to ride without fear of a mechanical failure putting you in the hospital.

6) Check the oil. Open the fill screw carefully and make sure that there's enough oil in there that it tries to spill out. If not, add oil. Plain old 30W will do fine, but you'll need a pump or a squeeze bottle. Reinstall the fill screw by hand and tighten carefully with a screwdriver. Don't overtorque it, as the threads are easy to strip.
7) Check the gas. Visually and manually make sure that there's 2 stroke oil mixed in with it. It should have a distinct color to it, usually blue or green. It should feel slightly greasy to the touch, whereas straight gasoline feels almost sticky.
Fire it up and let it warm up. It should idle without the RPM wandering at a low steady idle. If you goose the throttle, it should accelerate and return to idle smoothly and quickly, without bogging, racing or backfiring.

If it passes these checks, it should be safe to ride without fear of damaging it.

After that, just make sure the lights work and the mirrors are where you want them and secure (you should really have at least one mirror).

Basic rider safety tips that (hopefully) they will drill into you in your safety course:
-Always ride with your throttle hand low, never high. Unexpected acceleration will throw your upper body back, causing you to hang on to the handlebars. When this happens, your arms will straighten and your hand will twist the throttle. You want that twist to give you less throttle, not more.
-Always cover your clutch when pushing your engine hard so you are ready to disconnect the motor from the rear wheel in the event of a lockup.
- Remember that the bike responds to pressure on the handlebars to swerve, *NOT* your body lean. If you need to swerve, push the handle bar on the side you wish to turn to.
- Remember that the bike doesn't want to turn while braking and doesn't brake well while turning. In an emergency, pick one course of action or the other. Don't try to do both.
- You naturally steer to where you're looking. Always look at where you want to be, not threats.
- Most importantly (IMO) always watch everyone who might pose a danger to you and assume that they will be. Be ready to respond when it happens so you can avoid a collision. You always have to drive defensively on a bike.

Word salad!
-Slashy

Last edited by GoSlash27 on Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:32 pm; edited 1 time in total
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 50s x3 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7318
Location: seattle/athens
Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:53 pm quote
Geez, don't agonize over wanting Red too. They are both great bikes sort at the opposite ends of the Super spectrum of Best Bikes Available, both great examples at a fair price and you know you wanted both. Me too and I feel no guilt. You wisely got the one you liked best after deciding not to try for both and that was probably smart too. Your second Vespa is still out there waiting for you and it's never too soon to begin the hunt w/ no pressure.

Good on you for safety course and good gear too, be prepared so your experience is all you've been dreaming of. Preparing for piccy deluge to follow, including that first rolling shot w/ you up.
Hooked
1974 Vespa 125 Primavera, 1980 Bajaj Chetak, 1962 Lambretta 175TV3, 2006 Yamaha Vino
Joined: 07 Jul 2017
Posts: 429
Location: Boston, MA
Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:30 pm quote
Kimono32, I know the older bikes can be tough to lock up since you can't get a chain through the tire. Here's the solution I put together - hopefully it'll give you some ideas.

I'm very excited for you! I've only been on my first vintage scooter for about a month now and I'm still giddy as can be, so I totally know where you're coming from.

20170731_191709.jpg

Ossessionato
Joined: 22 Oct 2011
Posts: 4042
Location: Tega Cay, SC
Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:03 pm quote
Full face helmet., this is a must - do research and try several on at your local scooter/ MC shop. Kelvar/tough leather gloves - don't skimp here. Most people put out their hands when they fall and you want something good between your digits and the tarmac. Shoes - again don't skimp. Jacket - here is where you may save a few bucks as there is always decent used jackets on CL from those that bought the best stuff, then changed their minds about riding. I like leather because you will slide when you hit, rather than textile material, which tends to grip the road.
Hooked
a pair of "ran when parked" Rallys
Joined: 21 Jun 2013
Posts: 345
Location: Middletown, CT
Mon Jul 31, 2017 6:12 pm quote
Congrats on your awesome new acquisition.

For Full Face helmets, I like the Icon Airmada line. It's ECE rated, and has a good balance of noise, weight, and airflow for a reasonable price.

I'm tempted to try the Fly Tourist Vista for my next lid, though. It has a removable jaw piece, so it's technically not a full face, although it provides all of the comfort of one. I haven't tried one on, but it's appeal to me is less visual distraction.

If you will be riding at speed, I suggest wearing ear protection, too. Good ear plugs will actually allow you to hear dangers better, masking out wind noise.

I loved your boosted Cons, but foot injuries do happen in wrecks. Maybe go with a set of Engineer boots (I'm short too) minimum, while you are getting confident on the scoot. Once you are an established rider, the height issue will be less, and Motorcycle specific boots are going to be safer.

I personally have two textile suits, which I use with full armor: An Olympia one piece and a Fieldsheer two piece, both with removable liners for winter.

I also have two pair of leather gloves: Thickly insulated TourMasters with wind covers for winter, and Dianese sport bike gloves with carbon knuckle protection, and palm sliders.

If the above sounds excessive, I commute on a fast little Harley in all sorts of weather, and like to make it home in one piece for my little girl. I'll put on a leather jacket and jeans for a Sunday afternoon ride, but feel unprotected. I've never had a major crash, and my minor crashes were without gear (in my stupid reckless years). I wish I was smart enough like you and listened to those who told me to take an MSF course from the get go, although I've taken advanced training in recent years.
Ossessionato
BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2842
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Tue Aug 01, 2017 6:26 am quote
Larrytsg wrote:
You probably want to have your helmet before the MSF class.
You must have a helmet before the MSF class. In this case, since your class is coming up so soon and you don't have a lot of time to shop for helmets, I'd suggest you visit some of the local motorcycle shops and find a helmet on clearance that fits. It probably won't be your last helmet, but an inexpensive helmet will get you by until you get a better idea of what you need and want.

Same goes for gloves, jacket, and boots -- you need them for class --but you can get some beginners gear anywhere.

Ride safe & have fun!
Molto Verboso
2009 GTS 250, 2013 Buddy 125, 2014 Triumph Bonneville
Joined: 23 Apr 2016
Posts: 1856
Location: North Jersey
Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:29 am quote
Can't see the rest of that chain in your picture...But that chain needs to go around an object, or if at home in your garage , needs a big eyebolt into concrete. If not, then the thieves can just lift up the scooter and toss it into a pickup or van.
Bazziemoto wrote:
Kimono32, I know the older bikes can be tough to lock up since you can't get a chain through the tire. Here's the solution I put together - hopefully it'll give you some ideas.

I'm very excited for you! I've only been on my first vintage scooter for about a month now and I'm still giddy as can be, so I totally know where you're coming from.
Hooked
1974 Vespa 125 Primavera, 1980 Bajaj Chetak, 1962 Lambretta 175TV3, 2006 Yamaha Vino
Joined: 07 Jul 2017
Posts: 429
Location: Boston, MA
Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:59 am quote
Vintage1 wrote:
Can't see the rest of that chain in your picture...But that chain needs to go around an object, or if at home in your garage , needs a big eyebolt into concrete. If not, then the thieves can just lift up the scooter and toss it into a pickup or van.
Right. My first post says I lock it to a lamp post.
Molto Verboso
2009 GTS 250, 2013 Buddy 125, 2014 Triumph Bonneville
Joined: 23 Apr 2016
Posts: 1856
Location: North Jersey
Tue Aug 01, 2017 9:39 am quote
Bazziemoto wrote:
Vintage1 wrote:
Can't see the rest of that chain in your picture...But that chain needs to go around an object, or if at home in your garage , needs a big eyebolt into concrete. If not, then the thieves can just lift up the scooter and toss it into a pickup or van.
Right. My first post says I lock it to a lamp post.
OK got it. I didn't know if your photo was of the scooter at your house where you use the lamp post.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 479
Location: MN
Tue Aug 01, 2017 11:52 am quote
it is LOVE!!!!!!

IMG_6974.JPG

Addicted
Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:13 pm quote
I regret that I have but one up-vote to give for this picture.
Banned
2:6
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 7466
Location: San Francisco
Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:15 pm quote
so now you have the picture to update your avatar.
Addicted
Vespa PX 177 Settantesimo
Joined: 01 Feb 2017
Posts: 652
Location: Norf Wheezy
Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:22 pm quote
Congrats!

That is a great looking bike. Enjoy the rides!
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 479
Location: MN
Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:29 pm quote
And nope, I did not ride it in shorts. I didn't ride it at all (hence no rolling shot, Voodoo). I'm terrified of dropping it. It is not quite as heavy as the P, but still feels very heavy and unwieldy to me. I'll wait until I learn a bit on the cycles at the MSF course this week. I struggle HARD to even get it on the center stand.

Great advice from you all on protecting your scooter from theft. There aren't a whole lot of places on it to loop cables or chains through. We cobbled together a cable tangle for last night, but I plan to adopt some of your ideas. Bazziemoto, I liked your three step plan. Super pretty Primavera, too. Congrats to you!

All the gear tips and brand names were very appreciated. Seems like a full face helmet is de rigeur. Surprises me, since it seems scooter people around here are always riding free in flip flops, shorts, and surfer hair flying all over the place. And the Italians in their stilettos and miniskirts. But like Blackbomber, I want to make it home in one piece for my littles, so....safety first.

I had to have a helmet for class tonight and having no time to go shopping, I did an online order of a Biltwell bonanza with bubble shield. Maybe a terrible idea, not sure, but I didn't want to get kicked out of the class.

Found some old Frye engineer boots in my closet and multiple leather jackets, including several vintage Harleys. I think that'll work for now. Just need gloves.

I am going to follow Slash's step-by-step safety check which was awesome! Just the kind of info this newbie needed. And I need to get a mirror or two. And then someone mentioned wax. Yes, I want to clean up any grime and polish away. Including the grimy parts of the motor. Do I use car wash products?

Thanks y'all for your expert advice! Must go visit my new blue friend now😊

IMG_6980.JPG

Ossessionato
1980 P200E, 1974 Primavera, 04 Ninja 250
Joined: 04 Apr 2013
Posts: 3963
Location: San Diego, CA
Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:33 pm quote
Awesome bike.

In the MSF they really emphasized the full gear all the time thing. Someone asked about can I use less gear if I ride a scooter and they made the good point that if you come off the bike at 40MPH, does it matter if it's a scooter or a motorcycle? The MSF is great and you will learn a lot. I remember well from the class and my first years of riding that their point that almost all mistakes happen from not allowing enough time/space cushion to other cars or turns. That has happened to be the case every time I've either gotten into trouble or almost did. Have fun in the class.
Ossessionato
BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2842
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Tue Aug 01, 2017 12:42 pm quote
So you have your Biltwell helmet already? If not there's still time to run over to Scooterville or Go Moto and get something.
Hooked
1979 P125x, 1980 P200E
Joined: 05 Apr 2010
Posts: 397
Location: Roeland Park, Kansas
Tue Aug 01, 2017 1:06 pm quote
I also highly suggest looking at Hagerty Classic Auto insurance for this beauty. You can get "Defined Value" policy for very little money. Little Blue there deserves to be respected and you deserve full value in an accident or theft.

My '79 P200 carries $5000 value payout for only $130 a year in cost with no deductibles.

Might also look at a side stand. My wife had similar issues putting her P up on a stand. Side stand was the compromise

Enjoy
Banned
2:6
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 7466
Location: San Francisco
Tue Aug 01, 2017 1:15 pm quote
Hagerty is great, have 7, or is it 8, bikes insured with them.

standing on the right hand side of the bike helps in getting it on/off the stand, as the weight of the engine is on that side it makes lifting/pulling more direct.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 479
Location: MN
Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:04 pm quote
JKJ-FZ6 wrote:
So you have your Biltwell helmet already? If not there's still time to run over to Scooterville or Go Moto and get something.
Biltwell came in the mail today, but we didn't use it in class, so I can still return and replace if I can shop for something better. The Biltwell felt pretty good to me (inexperienced). It had a tiny bit of play on my head, but I think tighter might have been uncomfortable. Think I'll check out a full face at Scooterville. Don't know where Go Moro is, but I will find out. Thanks.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 479
Location: MN
Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:06 pm quote
Haggerty Classic Auto insurance is great! Should I overvalue the estimate a bit? 3,4,5000?
Banned
2:6
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 7466
Location: San Francisco
Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:17 pm quote
Hegarty is stated value, so you pay based on the value you give them.

Here's some comps for value:

At the high end $5000
http://bellomoto.com/index.php/site/scooter/150

This site is dated but $2500-$4000
http://scooterlounge.com/vespa/buyers-guide/vespa-super.shtml
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 479
Location: MN
Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:32 pm quote
[quote="oopsclunkthud"]Hegarty is stated value, so you pay based on the value you give them.

Here's some comps for value:

Thanks, really helpful!
Ossessionato
1979 P200e
Joined: 18 Mar 2013
Posts: 2478
Location: Lock Haven, PA
Wed Aug 02, 2017 3:58 am quote
Helmet fit is a tough one.... it's gotta be tight enough not to roll around on your noggin in regular use or in a crash, but loose enough not to squeeze your brains out of any available openings....

Shape is also important, as different companies fit different shaped heads. Back in the day people used to say you either had a Shoei head or an Arai head. With more manufacturers, it might be a search, but you'll find the right shape and fit if you look around.

And yes, it's time again for me to post Jay Leno, an experienced motorcyclist (and man with an apparently huge head) learning that he's been wearing the wrong sized helmet for decades.



Last edited by Larrytsg on Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:50 am; edited 1 time in total
Hooked
1974 Vespa 125 Primavera, 1980 Bajaj Chetak, 1962 Lambretta 175TV3, 2006 Yamaha Vino
Joined: 07 Jul 2017
Posts: 429
Location: Boston, MA
Wed Aug 02, 2017 5:24 am quote
Also keep in mind that your helmet padding will also compress slightly over time.
Molto Verboso
2009 GTS 250, 2013 Buddy 125, 2014 Triumph Bonneville
Joined: 23 Apr 2016
Posts: 1856
Location: North Jersey
Wed Aug 02, 2017 6:59 am quote
A proper fit is more like thinking as you try it on at the store--- "Hmmm. I wonder if this feels a little tight?" as opposed to--- " Hmmm. I wonder if this feels a little loose?"

As Bazziemoto mentioned, it will loosen up a tiny bit over time.
Ossessionato
1980 P200E, 1974 Primavera, 04 Ninja 250
Joined: 04 Apr 2013
Posts: 3963
Location: San Diego, CA
Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:33 am quote
Larrytsg, thanks for that video.
Ossessionato
1979 P200e
Joined: 18 Mar 2013
Posts: 2478
Location: Lock Haven, PA
Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:53 am quote
sdjohn wrote:
Larrytsg, thanks for that video.
I post this one frequently, since the message is so clear (and professionally done) and the question comes up often. I know I have a small head, and it surprises me that I don't wear an XS size. My wife jokes that I look like a chipmunk when I open my modular helmet... but I remind her it needs to be snug.
Ossessionato
1980 P200E, 1974 Primavera, 04 Ninja 250
Joined: 04 Apr 2013
Posts: 3963
Location: San Diego, CA
Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:58 am quote
The guys at one motorcycle shop locally are freaks for getting the fit right. They ordered multiple helmets for my wife until they were happy the fit was snug. The size - XXXS. Find that on the average shop shelf. But it fits right.
Ossessionato
1976 Super (x 2), 1974 Primavera (x 2), 2006 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 4883
Location: So Cal
Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:31 am quote
LOL @ 8:35

Helmet rep: It's really made up of two pieces, the hard outer shell that's designed to spread energy over a large area, and the inner liner that absorbs the energy...

Leno: (pointing to his brain) And then you have the chewy nuggat center
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 479
Location: MN
Wed Aug 02, 2017 3:57 pm quote
Great video, super informative! I did measure my head and the Biltwell size chart indicated a size large. But after watching this clip, I believe it's too big. And the footage of that motorcycle accident was motivation for a full face. Also, didn't realize it, but I kinda miss Jay Leno. Thanks larrytsg.
Addicted
1965 Sears Allstate, 2013 GTS 300 Super i.e.
Joined: 24 Jul 2012
Posts: 597
Location: Bay City, MI
Wed Aug 02, 2017 6:51 pm quote
You don't "need" and of the safety gear...it is like insurance...its only there in case you need it. But ride as much gear as you can as "if" you go down, you will be glad you did. There was a gal in the Modern forum that was wearing a 3/4 helmet and she went down and I believe she was not going very fast and she hit her jaw and really messed herself up. Titanium plates and many surgeries later she was still having issues. I don't think she rode after that. Can't blame here. While all of us are giddy like you when riding, we are taking a calculated risk riding. Good thing you are taking a RSC and take it slow and ride back streets until you get comfortable with all the controls. But most importantly, have fun. My '65 Allstate puts a way bigger grin on my face than my 2013 GTS 300. It also gets smiles from most people that see it. I am sure yours will too as that is a nice looking scooter. These will be fun days you remember when you are old and gray. Enjoy the ride and ride safely.
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