From Dreamer to Owner, now what?
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Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Wed Aug 15, 2018 2:07 pm quote
In case you missed it....

The original and very funny comment from V oodoo. Never in my life have I been referred to as a heifer.

IMG_3808.PNG

Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Wed Aug 15, 2018 2:08 pm quote
Me n Blue

IMG_3809.PNG

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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Wed Aug 15, 2018 5:00 pm quote
Too funny!

-Slashy
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1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T / 2009 Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 694
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:52 am quote
When I was working in Lowell, my ride was 30-40 minutes each way. Since I rode most of the year (yes, even in Michigan) and my shift started at 7:00 I got to see the change of seasons in the wee morning hours. You notice it in a car, but you really notice it on two wheels.

There was a sweet spot where part of the ride was just as the sun was coming up through the trees. My ride took me along a twisty road by the river, and those mornings were some of my favorite rides ever. I could walk into the shop and even the smell of CNC coolant and the rantings of the plant manager couldn't harsh my mellow.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:42 pm quote
seamus26 wrote:
When I was working in Lowell, my ride was 30-40 minutes each way. Since I rode most of the year (yes, even in Michigan) and my shift started at 7:00 I got to see the change of seasons in the wee morning hours. You notice it in a car, but you really notice it on two wheels.

There was a sweet spot where part of the ride was just as the sun was coming up through the trees. My ride took me along a twisty road by the river, and those mornings were some of my favorite rides ever. I could walk into the shop and even the smell of CNC coolant and the rantings of the plant manager couldn't harsh my mellow.
Seamus--I could almost feel the morning mist and envision the sunrise just reading this. Thanks for posting. Nothing like starting the day with a nice ride. Too bad I'm a bit chicken to commute with Blue. If all I had was a twisty road along the river, I totally would.

Slash--the video was gross and funny and I can't get that big foot out of my head.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 50s x2 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7069
Location: seattle/athens
Fri Aug 17, 2018 8:19 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
.... Never in my life have I been referred to as a heifer.
Yeah... Well I guess you were about due then.

Just reread/ skimmed your whole thread. Damn, that was fun. You get so overwhelmed, then so pissed and finally so gloriously victorious. Great fun to observe and a true inspiration to newbs of all genders and species.

PS If that's a pic of you n Blue, it's NSFW you know
And what is the deal with cows and Vespas anyway?



Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 19, 2018 12:28 pm quote
V oodoo wrote:
Just reread/ skimmed your whole thread. Damn, that was fun. You get so overwhelmed, then so pissed and finally so gloriously victorious. Great fun to observe and a true inspiration to newbs of all genders and species.
Thanks, V oodoo. Yeah, I was an emotional basket case last year. Because it was important to me that my Vespa dream didn't fizzle out due to challenging first-time-ever mechanical work. Thanks to all the good and knowledgeable people here, I have succeeded in that goal. So far. But now, a new challenge presents itself....

Last night, I was riding around in the dark about 11:00pm. That's my new riding schedule since hub works late hours in the fall. I pulled up to a stop sign and the engine died. It kicked over again pretty easily, but then wanted to die every time I slowed to a stop. I was a little freaked out and the dark quiet night suddenly seemed ominous instead of peaceful. Monsters, robbers, drug cartels....my imagination started working overtime. I ran every single stop sign and stoplight for the next few miles and sped directly home. I made it (big sigh of relief), but Blue died the minute I hit the driveway.

I searched MV briefly this morning and need to do more searching this afternoon. Perhaps it's a dirty carb (since I didn't clean it last winter like I should have), or maybe debris in the float bowl/gas tank, faulty fuel tap line???? Not quite sure where to start. Gas tank was recently filled, but had provided a long uneventful ride already.

Anyway, I didn't really expect to make it through an entire riding season without something mechanical to learn. I'm lucky I made it this far.

If you read this post and your mind instantly identifies my problem, please, I am all ears Thanks in advance.

V oodoo, I could go on and on with bovine puns to describe that last scooter pic, but I'll spare you all. It's udderly ridiculous, to say the very least. It hurt my eyes.
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Sun Aug 19, 2018 1:28 pm quote
Kimono,

Did you notice if it smelled rich? Did you have to keep the throttle open to keep it running?
First step would be to check the connection to the spark plug (they can work loose and behave that way), then pull the plug and take a look at it.

Best,
-Slashy
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 19, 2018 3:38 pm quote
GoSlash27 wrote:
Kimono,

Did you notice if it smelled rich? Did you have to keep the throttle open to keep it running?
First step would be to check the connection to the spark plug (they can work loose and behave that way), then pull the plug and take a look at it.

Best,
-Slashy
Smelling rich to me means wearing expensive cologne. Have no frame of reference for your definition. But, yes, had to blip the throttle constantly when sliding through the stop lights. I will check the plug. Thank you very much, Slash!
Hooked
2001 LML 150
Joined: 16 Jul 2017
Posts: 310
Location: Melb, Aus
Sun Aug 19, 2018 3:47 pm quote
Kimono... I've had a very similar problem with mine - where it wouldn't idle, and I had to keep the revs right up just to keep it running. Turns out there was a bit of crud in the idle jet. In fact, it's happened a couple of times and it's been the jet dirty both times.

How's your confidence to take off filter and remove and clean the jets?

Hope that helps.
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Sun Aug 19, 2018 4:21 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
Smelling rich to me means wearing expensive cologne.
Kimono,

An engine that is running on too much gas and not enough air has a certain smell to it, it fairly reeks of gasoline fumes and soot. It smells "rich". Think of an old, poorly maintained truck that's belching out black smoke.
An engine that's getting too much air and not enough gas, OTOH, will smell "lean"; hot metal, possibly melting plastic. Plus it'll usually make pinging noises and possibly backfire.

Did you notice any odd smells, or did it smell about like normal, just didn't want to idle?

Best,
-Slashy
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 50s x2 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7069
Location: seattle/athens
Sun Aug 19, 2018 4:28 pm quote
Philos wrote:
Kimono... I've had a very similar problem with mine - where it wouldn't idle, and I had to keep the revs right up just to keep it running. Turns out there was a bit of crud in the idle jet. In fact, it's happened a couple of times and it's been the jet dirty both times.

How's your confidence to take off filter and remove and clean the jets?

Hope that helps.
I'll bet that's it if it's not just adjusted too slow. Or a loose plug connection. Idle should be adjusted OK after all these miles then suddenly this happens. You prob won't need this now you have a Haynes manual, but just unscrew those 2 slotted brass dealies w/ holes in them under your filter and take them to an air compressor for a thorough cleaning & air purge. Reverse procedure & test ride. Do you carry a few tools & a real flashlite on these night time prowls? I know you have a phone, but that'd be cheating except as a flashlite .
You can usually adjust your idle with a dime in a pinch.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 19, 2018 8:43 pm quote
Philos wrote:
Kimono... I've had a very similar problem with mine - where it wouldn't idle, and I had to keep the revs right up just to keep it running. Turns out there was a bit of crud in the idle jet. In fact, it's happened a couple of times and it's been the jet dirty both times.

How's your confidence to take off filter and remove and clean the jets?

Hope that helps.
How's my jet-cleaning confidence?



But, I spent some quality bedtime reading with my Haynes and I think I have the diagram figured out enough to try it.

I adjusted my idle screw a bit tonight. Turned it clockwise about 10 minutes and it sounded worse, kind of clackety. So turned it back 5 and it was better. Can you do this while it's running? I didn't know, so I kept turning it on and off.

Didn't die once while I was playing around in the driveway, and it didn't smell rich or lean (really good descriptions, Slashy, of each unique scent), so I went for a little test ride. It seemed to run just fine and I couldn't replicate the problem.

But, I think I'll clean the jets anyway. I'm sure they need it. And the problem didn't appear last night until I had been riding close to an hour, so not sure what to make of that.

Do I carry tools? YES! Some. A few.... Maybe just a phone, my Hagerty roadside assistance card, and a few assorted cables and wrenches. I know, it's lame. I need to do better. Tonight, I was riding along and I felt a clunk on my left wrist. Sure enough, my mirror had lost a screw and fallen over. Even though I had the proper wrench in my toolkit, the screw was missing. I searched around in the dark with my flashlight (yep, the one on my phone) to no avail. So I unscrewed the other screw, put the mirror stem through my belt loop, and decided I'd better just go home.

Thanks, friends, for the very helpful tips. Will attempt jet exploration and cleaning tomorrow.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 19, 2018 8:48 pm quote
PS: the spark plug connection seemed fine, but I probably will replace it tomorrow just because it's cheap and I know how to do it:wink:
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LXS 150
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 958
Location: The OTHER South Bay, CA
Sun Aug 19, 2018 11:04 pm quote
V oodoo wrote:
And what is the deal with cows and Vespas anyway?
...
It may be just a bunch of bull, but it's been going on for heifer.
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1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T / 2009 Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 694
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Mon Aug 20, 2018 12:36 am quote
WARNING : SELF EFFACING HUMOR POST

Early on in my Vespa ownership I was riding that aforementioned stretch of road on my way home from work. It was a beautiful, sunny day. Not too warm, and with just enough of a breeze to bring the smell of the alfalfa and wildflowers into my path. The Vespa was running great, and I was really starting to develop some riding confidence with it, then suddenly ...

nothing. It quit. I coasted quietly to the side of the road. Like one often does, I spent a few minutes just looking and thinking. There's always that sort of zen moment where you hope that if you stare at something long enough, the universe will just fix itself and you can be on your way. That moment passed quickly.

I checked the gas and it looked like there was plenty. It was five miles back to the shop and fifteen home, so walking wasn't an option. Yet.

I tinkered and fiddled and it would fire no matter how much I kicked it.

Some of you have probably already figured out what I eventually did. The "reserve" tank on a Vespa isn't what I had thought it was. Sure, I had gas. Just not enough. Once I flipped over to reserve I magically had my bike back.

Now, when I hit that point where it cuts out for lack of fuel, I'm able to pull the clutch, switch to reserve and pop the clutch without even slowing down much. One of the members here called it the "Petcock Boogie". I never forgot.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 26, 2018 2:33 pm quote
Hiya! Quick and maybe dumb question here. I'm sitting in the driveway hoping to clean some jets and staring at the airbox cover and my Haynes.

If I unscrew the idle jet (or is it the throttle stop adjuster screw? or are they one and the same?), how will I know how far to screw it back in? Do I count the turns?

Thanks in advance
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'64 Motovespa 150S (177) , '64 V90
Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 570
Location: S.Salem, NY
Sun Aug 26, 2018 2:40 pm quote
Count the turns in to just bottom it out before you turn it out to remove it.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 26, 2018 2:42 pm quote
Moto64 wrote:
Count the turns in to just bottom it out before you turn it out to remove it.
Aha, thank you so much, Moto 64!
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 26, 2018 3:13 pm quote
I really am trying to be self sufficient here, but the diagram confuses me. Maybe just a teensy weensy more help? Oh, who am I kidding, I need a whole heap of help.

Are these the jets that I should clean? Pilot jet and main jet? That's how I'm interpreting the diagram, anyway.

It's kinda fun to see my carb for the first time.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 26, 2018 3:14 pm quote
Oops, forgot the pic.

IMG_3916.JPG

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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Sun Aug 26, 2018 3:40 pm quote
Yes'm. Those are the jets.
The main jet (bigger one) pulls apart into 3 pieces.

Best,
-Slashy
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 50s x2 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7069
Location: seattle/athens
Sun Aug 26, 2018 3:48 pm quote
Yep those are them. And I see that you've got the stock 20/15 carb. One of these days we might be able to help you bump that up to a bigger 20/20 for a little more power. Here's a chart so you can check that you have the correct jets in there. Good test for your eyes reading the tiny little numbers on them.

Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:59 pm quote
Thank you, gentlemen, for your kind and immediate help this evening

No jets have been cleaned yet because I'm not sure where to go to get compressed air and everything is closed early on Sunday. But, it felt pretty exciting to take off the airbox cover and glimpse what was inside. A sweet little air filter with the Piaggio shield on the bottom and a cute lil' carb with Dellorto inscribed on it. Everything is so miniature.

I'm sure the carb is one of the most rudimentary things to most of you, but it's all new to me. Every part is a little mystery and I'm quite interested in figuring out how it works.

I messed with the carb for a bit and got it put back together (whew), then changed my oil, adjusted my clutch (so easy now), tweaked the idle a bit and went for a short ride.

Now I'm on to the cold beer portion of the evening, which is always my treat for attempting anything mechanical. Sprawling on the sofa with the beer and reading Scooterworks' Carburetor Jetting 101. Really good stuff

Thanks again for the assistance. You guys are great.
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Sun Aug 26, 2018 5:12 pm quote
Quote:
I'm sure the carb is one of the most rudimentary things to most of you, but it's all new to me.
Kimono,
Glad all is well. Actually, the carb is a magical talisman whose complexities and secrets are an arcane art within the purview of a few select clergy.
Especially by today's standards, where fuel injection and computerized controls are common. It's probably the most complex piece of equipment on your bike.

But don't worry. While they can be occasionally finicky, carbs are ingeniously simple devices that many of us have been tinkering with since childhood. We can keep you out of trouble.

Best,
-Slashy
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 26, 2018 5:22 pm quote
seamus26 wrote:
Like one often does, I spent a few minutes just looking and thinking. There's always that sort of zen moment where you hope that if you stare at something long enough, the universe will just fix itself and you can be on your way. That moment passed quickly.


One of the members here called it the "Petcock Boogie". I never forgot.
Another great story, Seamus. And perfect way to describe that moment where something goes wrong and you just stop, stare, and hope for magic.

Happened to me for the first time about a week ago. I knew the gas tank was low when I left home, but thought I could tempt fate. Nope, the engine died suddenly on a busy road, quite late at night. I pulled over and had that sinking feeling of I'm a moron and I just ran out of gas.

I was aware of the reserve, but doubted it worked, since my shut-off valve doesn't work at all. Thankfully, the engine kicked over right away and I rode straight home as fast as I could, feeling like a dumb teenager. The Petcock Boogie is an apt descriptor. I won't forget it either
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 50s x2 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7069
Location: seattle/athens
Sun Aug 26, 2018 5:49 pm quote
Good job Kimono. Now before you crack that second beer, here's your homework. These damn SI carbs are actually a bit more complex than most 'normal' old motorcycle carbs.


So much going on here . The layout is a bit goofy, number 10 jet is your 3rd jet and is accessed from inside the float bowl. But don't worry about it, yours is probably fine if Blue starts easily. Number 7 is your mixture adjustment, accessed at the back of the airbox w/ a rubber plug in the access hole if it's still there. More about that here: Mixture screw adjustment, got a good link? .

Got a headache yet? sorry....
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Sun Aug 26, 2018 6:31 pm quote
Quote:
These damn SI carbs are actually a bit more complex than most 'normal' old motorcycle carbs.
V oodoo,
They are, in the sense that a change to any individual circuit has a greater effect on neighboring circuits. But at the same time, they are not any more mechanically complex than the garden variety automotive carb*. In many ways, they're much simpler.
They are still fairly easy to grasp if you break them down into a cluster of circuits. The trick isn't in understanding the function of each individual part, but rather diagnosing problems by sound and smell. I'm betting that Kimono will develop this ability pretty rapidly.

Best,
-Slashy

*I say "garden variety", but automotive carbs are kind of a relic of a bygone era these days...
Ossessionato
BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2748
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Sun Aug 26, 2018 6:46 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
No jets have been cleaned yet because I'm not sure where to go to get compressed air and everything is closed early on Sunday.
PM sent.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Sun Aug 26, 2018 7:12 pm quote
GoSlash27 wrote:
Actually, the carb is a magical talisman whose complexities and secrets are an arcane art within the purview of a few select clergy.

Indeed! Such a lofty description. I so want to be a part of the carburetor clergy club. Thanks for your offer of help to keep me on the road.

V oodoo--the second beer is long since drunk and your diagram don't make no sense to me. In the sober light of dawn, I will take another peek....

JKJ--pm sent and thank you very much!
Hooked
62 VBB 64 GL Rally 200s 74s-76-77 P200s 79-82
Joined: 21 Jul 2013
Posts: 128
Location: Tucson
Mon Aug 27, 2018 12:54 am quote
There is a great scoot community who recently had the Land of 10 K scoots. JKJ was at the rally. I don't remember seeing your 66? Were you there? Anyhow I think they are having a get together at the Wheels of Italy on Sunday, September 16th, at Lake Calhoun Center. Connect with them as many ride some sweet vintage scoots like yours and you can commiserate vintage jet care and feeding. I think its the modern fuel - the alcohol content and its reaction to the aluminum that I suspect causes it to move contaminates to the smallest parts of the carburetor system, the jets. I know some of the riders use the E free fuels that are available in your area, as boats really get gummed up with Ethanol fuel. For some reason we don't use inline fuel filters on our vintage Vespas. I have asked why not use such technology and I'm told we just don't. Is it Vespas or Vespae?

tcscooterclub@gmail.com
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1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T / 2009 Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 694
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Mon Aug 27, 2018 9:25 am quote
GoSlash27 wrote:
Quote:
I'm sure the carb is one of the most rudimentary things to most of you, but it's all new to me.
Kimono,
Glad all is well. Actually, the carb is a magical talisman whose complexities and secrets are an arcane art within the purview of a few select clergy.
Especially by today's standards, where fuel injection and computerized controls are common. It's probably the most complex piece of equipment on your bike.
Don't let the carb scare you. Making it work properly is really a lot less involved than understanding exactly how it works, if that makes any sense. Gas and air go in, elves mix it together in the right proportions and feed the mixture into your engine that pushes you down the road. Keep the elves happy and everything will be hunky-dory.

You can deep dive into the math and science, but ultimately with just a little bit of knowledge of the parts and what they do, you can rebuild and tune a carb in easily under an hour. I mean, it's on TOP of the engine ... how hard can it be
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 50s x2 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7069
Location: seattle/athens
Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:42 am quote
^^^ this. Busted. I just posted that diagram to impress you.

Seriously what seamus said, you don't know much about your car's carb/injection but it drives fine down the road. Just clean those 2 jets thingies, double check the numbers against the chart, blow out the holes they came out of and put 'em back in, and ride happy. The most you should have to do is fiddle with that mixture adjustment but that's well explained in that other thread and pretty easy. For now leave it where it is & see what happens when you test ride it after jet cleaning.

Remind me again, why are we cleaning jets? Not that it's a bad thing to do...
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Mon Aug 27, 2018 1:31 pm quote
V oodoo wrote:
Remind me again, why are we cleaning jets? Not that it's a bad thing to do...
V oodoo,
Her bike didn't want to hold an idle the other night. Philo recommended that she clean the jets.

Best,
-Slashy
Ossessionato
1979 P200e
Joined: 18 Mar 2013
Posts: 2442
Location: Lock Haven, PA
Mon Aug 27, 2018 1:49 pm quote
From a carburetor neophyte, the guys are right.... the science behind it is more than you need to know to keep it going down the road.

The two jets are identified in your photo. Unscrew them and shoot them with some carburetor cleaner (comes in a handy "good for the environment" spray can) and just blow the possibly accumulated gunk out of them.

One jet is a stack, three pieces pressed together. Be Careful if you take this apart. The pieces may be pressed together tightly, and they're nice soft brass, so going all Arnold on them to get them apart may damage them. Most of the time you need to be able to see through the small holes to see that there's nothing caught up in there.... sometimes you need a super fine piece of copper wire (one strand, please) to poke through any grit you find in there.

Verify the numbers on your jets, mine is written in grease pencil on the carb box.

I had my carburetor rebuilt a few years ago (2014?), and I had to clean the jets in 2015 when I had some trouble with flat spots and high revving. Otherwise it runs like a top. You shouldn't have to mess with this too often.
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Mon Aug 27, 2018 6:54 pm quote
I also agree with the others; You don't need to understand all of the details if your objective is to simply keep your bike running. It's good enough to have a basic understanding of what the various circuits do and how to diagnose/ troubleshoot problems.
I just wanted to correct the notion that carbs are "rudimentary" to us; they are not. They are actually the single most complicated device on the entire bike.

Best,
-Slashy
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Mon Aug 27, 2018 8:18 pm quote
GoSlash27 wrote:
V oodoo wrote:
Remind me again, why are we cleaning jets? Not that it's a bad thing to do...
V oodoo,
Her bike didn't want to hold an idle the other night. Philo recommended that she clean the jets.

Best,
-Slashy
Exactly. We are also cleaning jets because Kimono32 would like to be very lazy if she could get away with it and just ride off into the sunset on her Italian shopping cart. But, dues must be paid (or so I'm told).

I've paid zero dues this season. Have just ridden happily around in the delightful summer heat with a niggly feeling that my luck will soon run out. It's time to learn something new and pay my annual dues.

I read Carburetor Jetting 101 thoroughly. It's not too hard to understand the bare bones basics. I think my scoot is stock, but haven't yet verified the jet numbers (appreciate the chart, V oodoo). I love the assurance that I don't have to be a jetting genius to make Blue run dependably. And I really, really like the description of elves working air/fuel magic down there in the carb. Go, elves, go!

Obviously, I won't become mechanically competent in this area anytime soon. But, I'm planting the seeds. And like Slashy said, good hearing and good smelling are integral parts of diagnosing carburetor problems. My hearing and smelling are finely tuned.

JKJ is being a pal and lending me his air compressor tomorrow (thanks!!!). So, expect some newb questions in the next few days, apologies starting now.

Lango--I'm intrigued by Wheels of Italy. Never heard of it, but it's close to home, so I might just go. Also, on the ethanol-free gas. I would like to say I always use it. I try, but I've cheated a few times this summer. There's none available near my house. If it makes a big difference, I won't cheat. Thanks.
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Mon Aug 27, 2018 8:44 pm quote
Larrytsg wrote:
The two jets are identified in your photo. Unscrew them and shoot them with some carburetor cleaner (comes in a handy "good for the environment" spray can) and just blow the possibly accumulated gunk out of them.

One jet is a stack, three pieces pressed together. Be Careful if you take this apart. The pieces may be pressed together tightly, and they're nice soft brass, so going all Arnold on them to get them apart may damage them. Most of the time you need to be able to see through the small holes to see that there's nothing caught up in there.... sometimes you need a super fine piece of copper wire (one strand, please) to poke through any grit you find in there.

Verify the numbers on your jets, mine is written in grease pencil on the carb box.
Very, very good info. I will not go all Arnold on my jets
Hooked
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 452
Location: MN
Mon Aug 27, 2018 8:48 pm quote
V oodoo wrote:
Just clean those 2 jets thingies, double check the numbers against the chart, blow out the holes they came out of and put 'em back in, and ride happy.
I like when you call engine parts "thingies". Very comforting, makes it sound easy. And your diagram made no more sense sober than two beers in
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Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Thu Aug 30, 2018 5:33 pm quote
Kimono,
Don't worry; we've got your back, Dawg!

Demistifying the Si series Carb

Best,
-Slashy
Team Scooter Trash for Petfinder Foundation   Vespa Wasp Pin Badges   Scooter Parts Company
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