From Dreamer to Owner, now what?
Post Reply    Forum -> Not-So-Modern Previous123...192021Next
Author Message
Hooked
1981 P200E / 1979 P200E / 1974 Rally 200
Joined: 30 Jul 2009
Posts: 390
Location: San Francisco, CA
Wed Aug 02, 2017 9:32 pm quote
Congratulations! That bike looks really nice.
Hooked
CUTDOWN PX200.1978 YAMAHA DT 125
Joined: 10 Dec 2016
Posts: 285
Location: southwestau
Thu Aug 03, 2017 12:41 am quote
hjo wrote:
Congratulations! That bike looks really nice.
yeh

Last edited by joshbangbang on Sat Aug 05, 2017 8:10 pm; edited 1 time in total
Hooked
1979 P125x, 1980 P200E
Joined: 05 Apr 2010
Posts: 397
Location: Roeland Park, Kansas
Fri Aug 04, 2017 7:31 am quote
joshbangbang wrote:
hjo wrote:
Congratulations! That bike looks really nice.
what bike?
Don't be a dick! The only objectification should be of bikes, not people here!
Banned
2009 GTS 250, 2013 Buddy 125, 2014 Triumph Bonneville
Joined: 23 Apr 2016
Posts: 2038
Location: North Jersey
Fri Aug 04, 2017 8:35 am quote
shawn45 wrote:
Don't be a dick! The only objectification should be of bikes, not people here!
WHOA! Try the decaf bro.
Addicted
1965 Sears Allstate, 2013 GTS 300 Super i.e.
Joined: 24 Jul 2012
Posts: 597
Location: Bay City, MI
Fri Aug 04, 2017 8:51 am quote
Do you have more pictures of this scooter? Is it original (not repainted or restored in anyway?). See you have the mickey mouse tail light. Those alone are much sought after. How many miles.
Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:41 am quote
msprygada wrote:
Do you have more pictures of this scooter? Is it original (not repainted or restored in anyway?). See you have the mickey mouse tail light. Those alone are much sought after. How many miles.
Hi. Yes, I have tons more pics. I had posted them on an earlier thread (Help! Shopping for my first NSM) two weeks ago, so I didn't repost here. The Super is in original condition with original paint. The Mickey Mouse taillight is original too, but has an off brand center lens that doesn't belong. I may replace it later.

Sadly, Blue is just sitting in the garage, I've been too busy to even check her out. Maybe this weekend. Thanks!
Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:45 am quote
msprygada wrote:
Do you have more pictures of this scooter? Is it original (not repainted or restored in anyway?). See you have the mickey mouse tail light. Those alone are much sought after. How many miles.
Btw, a '65 red Sears Allstate just popped up on Craigs here in mpls, but appears to have sold in a day. Is that what you have there in your avatar pic? Pretty!
Addicted
1965 Sears Allstate, 2013 GTS 300 Super i.e.
Joined: 24 Jul 2012
Posts: 597
Location: Bay City, MI
Fri Aug 04, 2017 12:05 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
msprygada wrote:
Do you have more pictures of this scooter? Is it original (not repainted or restored in anyway?). See you have the mickey mouse tail light. Those alone are much sought after. How many miles.
Btw, a '65 red Sears Allstate just popped up on Craigs here in mpls, but appears to have sold in a day. Is that what you have there in your avatar pic? Pretty!
Yes, bought it 4 years ago. Original condition. More pictures here.

https://goo.gl/photos/GziqZ3QJo5PArKAU8
Member
patina SS180, tired P200E, project-on-hold VBC 150
Joined: 01 Mar 2013
Posts: 32
Location: New Zealand
Sat Aug 05, 2017 1:50 am quote
Kimono32 wrote:
... All the gear tips and brand names were very appreciated. Seems like a full face helmet is de rigeur. Surprises me, since it seems scooter people around here are always riding free in flip flops, shorts, and surfer hair flying all over the place. And the Italians in their stilettos and miniskirts. But like Blackbomber, I want to make it home in one piece for my littles, so....safety first....
It's always a balance of risk / convenience / style.

I'll sometimes wear on open face helmet, sneakers, and ordinary jeans on a weekend ride, city speeds, < 30 mins (but with a leather jacket, style + safety). For daily commuting (30 mins ride, lane splitting etc) and open road riding I use a full face helmet, armoured jeans or armoured textile riding pants, armoured textile or leather jacket.

But each to their own. Look at some of the ride videos on the SIP website, and there are experienced riders in T shirts and shorts (but never flip-flops ).

Hope you enjoy your entry to classic scooter land. You may want to think about some group riding, not sure what clubs there are around you, but if you like dressing up, note that an old scoot is eligible for the DGR (https://www.gentlemansride.com/) and there is a ride in St Paul / Minneapolis.
Ossessionato
1979 P200e
Joined: 18 Mar 2013
Posts: 2560
Location: Lock Haven, PA
Sat Aug 05, 2017 3:44 am quote
vandem wrote:
You may want to think about some group riding, not sure what clubs there are around you, but if you like dressing up, note that an old scoot is eligible for the DGR (https://www.gentlemansride.com/) and there is a ride in St Paul / Minneapolis.
As much fun as the Distinguished Gentleman's Ride is, I would not recommend this for a noob rider. There's just so much stop and go, and there is usually no discipline in the formation. More of a mob of two wheelers trying desperately to get to the front of the pack. On the Boston ride when we get up to speed, it's pleasant, but once in congested traffic, everyone else seems to jockey for position. Either that or they're all trying to pass me to get away from the Two Stroke Smoke.

Go to YouTube and look at some of the videos, and you'll see what I mean.
Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Sat Aug 05, 2017 11:24 am quote
Oh boy, the DGR!! Right up my alley (if my alley was a lot more experienced). Guess I'll wait til next year. But I love the concept.

Just returned from morning 1 of the MSF class. Harder than it looks to coordinate all your movements and control your bike. I'm exhausted.

However, there were moments of partial glee. This WILL be fun eventually. Cannot imagine my road disasters had I not signed up for this class. (Again, thanks Larrytsg for the invaluable tip).

I rode on a Honda Glom, so cute, smallest bike available. But not near as cute as my Blue. Looking forward to getting her out on Sunday. In a parking lot. Practicing my skillz. Got to start somewhere.

Vandem, great tips on your riding gear and how you change it up. I live in a very safe, slow traffic neighborhood, so my open face and bubble will probably be okay for quick trips around my house. But for any commuting, I'm going to gear up.

Caught hub watching SIP riding videos and YouTube vespa restorations. Me thinks someone else might be intrigued by the Vespa scene. Who wouldn't be though, right?

And no, he can't ride Blue until he gets his license. You gotta earn the privilege.

Livin' the dream.
Style Maven
74 50s x3 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special '66(?) Super125 + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7655
Location: seattle/athens
Sat Aug 05, 2017 12:00 pm quote
Good for you, doing it right!

To many ppl start out chasing the dream by buying the first scooter that catches their eye, then asking questions. You did your research, landed here with a nice attitude and got to pick out a bike that experienced owners have given you their opinions on. You also got pretty lucky which doesn't hurt at all - you found a sweetie there.

Rolling shot, STAT! Parking lot is just fine.

Re: hubby/SIP - I give it maybe a week before Red regret sets in. But that's OK, lots more out there waiting.
Hooked
CUTDOWN PX200.1978 YAMAHA DT 125
Joined: 10 Dec 2016
Posts: 285
Location: southwestau
Sat Aug 05, 2017 9:10 pm quote
shawn45 wrote:
joshbangbang wrote:
hjo wrote:
Congratulations! That bike looks really nice.
what bike?
Don't be a dick! The only objectification should be of bikes, not people here!
u been watching too much tv m8 ?


u better get a grip and pull yourself together
Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Sun Aug 06, 2017 7:25 pm quote
I finally rode my bike today and it was AWESOME!!!!

Got my motorcycle endorsement this morning and was roaring around a parking lot by my house this afternoon. Haven't had that much fun in a long long time. Sheer delight!

However there is a slight issue.... While I was riding, it started to rain. Not super heavy. It was actually very enjoyable to have raindrops rolling down the blue bubble on my helmet.

But soon after it started raining, the throttle started to stick. It would not return to idle when I let go, just stayed in position. I was able to manually move it and rode straight home. I am not sure how to figure out what the problem is. I tried to search on this forum, but didn't see anything exactly right.

I'm hoping it's not a big deal to fix. And that rain was not the problem, vespas can get wet, right? I'm going to get the manual out tomorrow and see if I can figure it out. But if you have any direction for me, please suggest. Cable?
Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Sun Aug 06, 2017 7:33 pm quote
V oodoo wrote:
Good for you, doing it right!

To many ppl start out chasing the dream by buying the first scooter that catches their eye, then asking questions. You did your research, landed here with a nice attitude and got to pick out a bike that experienced owners have given you their opinions on. You also got pretty lucky which doesn't hurt at all - you found a sweetie there.

Rolling shot, STAT! Parking lot is just fine.

Re: hubby/SIP - I give it maybe a week before Red regret sets in. But that's OK, lots more out there waiting.
Thanks, V oodoo! I did get lucky, both with my bike and with so many nice people here who helped me, you included of course! And judging from many of you, one scooter is never enough, so I'll just be keeping my eyes out for #2.
Banned
2:6
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 7519
Location: San Francisco
Sun Aug 06, 2017 8:03 pm quote
on the sticky throttle a temporary fix can be had with WD40 or triflow. If you look on the underside of the headset you can see that the throttle and shift tubes pass through several points on the aluminum headset. (if you can't see anything like that your bike may still have the super rare covers that hide it)

Anyhow, a bit of WD40 next to each spot where the tubes pass through will help. Grease is the ultimate fix but it's a pain to get it where it's needed. You have to take the headlight out, pull a small clip out to let the tube slide out a bit, put some grease on it and then put it all back together.

I'm sure others will chime in with options, the topic has come up so you may be able to find it with search.
Hooked
CUTDOWN PX200.1978 YAMAHA DT 125
Joined: 10 Dec 2016
Posts: 285
Location: southwestau
Sun Aug 06, 2017 8:36 pm quote
if the wd40 doesnt work there might be some wiring caught on the throttle tube clip (behind the headlight).

start with oops suggestion.


it may also be u need a new throttle cable and or outer , pretty easy to do and easy to learn too.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
a not so normal vbb2 '64, a weirdo vbx '86 and a not so normal pts100 '82
Joined: 15 Jun 2009
Posts: 5581
Location: Indo
Sun Aug 06, 2017 9:55 pm quote
love the bike Sis, congratz on the bike and its a good choice
Addicted
1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T / 2009 Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 705
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Mon Aug 07, 2017 2:11 am quote
Safety
Congratulations on the bike. It's a beauty. There's a whole level of care for a bike like that that goes far above and beyond putting brewery stickers over scratches. Um ... so I've heard.

I can't say anything about security. Our garage locks, so I have no worries there. We keep 3.5 scooters in there as well as six bikes, a Subaru and an '85 Porsche. It's a fairly nice neighborhood, so I don't worry much. My brother is in Minneapolis and seems to feel safe there, but I suppose it's all location, location, location. Judging by the pics it looks like a fairly affluent area, but bad things happen everywhere. I would suggest making your garage as secure as possible and call it good. As far as being out and about, I really have no input. I rely on my '79 P200E being heavier than a dead horse. Could it be stolen? Probably. Hopefully not.

As far as safety is concerned ... everyone (including myself) has opinions. Of course, all old timers will tell you that your most important safety item is your brain. Drive like everyone is actively trying to kill you.

In Michigan we have repealed the helmet law. That means idiots are now allowed to be idiots. Personally, I have seen two long time coworkers and avid Harley riders die because they weren't wearing helmets. Both were because somebody didn't see them on their bikes and pulled out in front of them. Tom never wore a helmet and died at the scene. Scotty usually wore a helmet, but decided on the first leg of his trip to Florida he'd go without. He lingered at the hospital for a few weeks before he finally passed away. Both deaths could probably have been avoided. A third coworker, Ron, probably would have suffered the same fate eventually, but cancer got him first. No helmet would have stopped that.

The thing is, if we were all honest with ourselves and were totally committed to safety, none of us would ever get on two wheels. Or we'd wear full plate mail with built in airbags. There is no amount of safety equipment that will ever make my Vespa as safe as my Volvo. Period. You just have to ask yourself, "how safe do I want to be?"

Having said that, here's my gear, and I adjust it for how and where I ride.

Helmet.
Always, always, always. I have three. I have a leather covered half that I rarely wear. It was my first, so I keep it around as a spare. I have a GMAX modular full face that I wear ... depending. Mostly, I use a hard half with flaps to cover my ears (wind noise) that's hilighter yellow for visibility and two pair of padded vented riding sunglasses, one dark tinted and one yellow for sunny/not sunny conditions respectively. Most of my riding is around town, maybe 40-45mph tops but usually 30 or less. If I'm cruising 60 on the back roads I wear the GMAX.

Gloves.
Always. I have some Joe Rocket armored leathers that I wear daily. Someone here on the forum made the comment that gloves keep your fingers from turning into crayons. That stuck with me. Thank you, whoever that was. I play guitar and want to keep doing so. I also have some heated Columbias that I wear in the winter. Those are all kinds of neat.

Jacket.
Almost always. If I'm just running up to the corner store for beer, I mean groceries, I'll go sans jacket. I have two. I have a S&S armored poly jacket with zipper vents that keeps me safe and fairly cool, even on hot days. I also have an old Wilson's leather that I wear when it gets cooler.

Shoes.
I always wear leather shoes. They aren't riding boots, by any means, but they'll stop road rash. I have two pairs of leather Chuck Taylors that do the trick.

I've had a lot of advice from people who ride. I've been told to NEVER use bungee cords because they can kill you. I know people who will never wear a backpack. I actually do both. I have some camping pictures somewhere here on the forum, and my bike was packed in a manner that might not be considered the safest by some, but it's always a calculated risk. And it was a great trip.

I look at it this way, I see bicyclists riding on the same roads in the same traffic wearing a lightweight helmet and spandex. They could be run over by the same cement truck that might hit me and probably neither of us would survive.

Ultimately it's up to you, but measure your gear based on the riding you will be doing. A lot of safety comes down to being smart and visible.

Happy riding!
Addicted
Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Mon Aug 07, 2017 3:02 am quote
Kimono,
Quote:
I'm hoping it's not a big deal to fix. And that rain was not the problem, vespas can get wet, right? I'm going to get the manual out tomorrow and see if I can figure it out. But if you have any direction for me, please suggest. Cable?
Could be the twist grip itself, the cable, or the carb. You'd need to isolate them to narrow down what's sticking.

I'll try to post some pics after work to show you how to check each. Once we've sorted out which component is at fault, I'll explain how to fix it.

In the meantime, I recommend *not* trying to lubricate your cable with grease or WD-40.

Best,
-Slashy
Addicted
Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Mon Aug 07, 2017 2:32 pm quote
kimono,
Real quick 'n' dirty. This should narrow down where your problem is.

http://imgur.com/a/RLpd1

Most likely it's the inner cable, which is easy to replace... but best to be sure.

If you have verified that your cable isn't catching on something in your air box, your throttle slide moves smoothly, and your throttle grip rotates cleanly, then your problem is the cable itself.

In the meantime, you should order a few extra inner cables just in case. A couple spare shifter cables and a couple spare clutch cables. Those can be used to repair every cable on the bike (except the choke).

Best,
-Slashy
Banned
2:6
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 7519
Location: San Francisco
Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:03 pm quote
Given the problem showed up when the rain started, it's most likely in the headset. There is a thin metal strip that wraps around the throttle tube just inside the bars near the grip. This is only attached on one end and acts as a cruse control (so you can signal with your right hand without dropping the throttle). This strip of metal tightens around the tube when you try and close the throttle and when it does not have any grease or oil on it, it can get extra sticky when it gets a bit wet.
Style Maven
74 50s x3 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special '66(?) Super125 + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7655
Location: seattle/athens
Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:48 pm quote
As advised, it's probably a sticky throttle tube. If you look under the headset from below, you'll see that the tube spins in the headset casting two places - a wide area next to the grip and a narrow area right where it enters the headlight cavity. Just like this:



You can see the wrap around leaf spring Patrick mentioned on the throttle tube, lower left.

You may be able to free things up for now by shooting some Tri Flow or similar into the 'bearing' areas from below, but if there's old gummy grease doing the best job involves disassembly, cleaning the tube & bores, sanding tube smooth then a light coat of grease. You are lucky that it is your throttle side - when you want to have a go, you will need to undo your front brake cable to get the throttle tube out of the headset. When it's time to do the other side, the clutch cable needs to come out & can be a bigger hassle.
Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:46 pm quote
oopsclunkthud wrote:
Given the problem showed up when the rain started, it's most likely in the headset. There is a thin metal strip that wraps around the throttle tube just inside the bars near the grip. This is only attached on one end and acts as a cruse control (so you can signal with your right hand without dropping the throttle). This strip of metal tightens around the tube when you try and close the throttle and when it does not have any grease or oil on it, it can get extra sticky when it gets a bit wet.
Well, this is all new and intimidating information to me, but I'm going to give it a shot. I've got my manual out and am referring to everything you all have written. First question... the thin metal strip that is there to hold the throttle in place as a type of cruise control--how do you engage that? Have I accidentally engaged it and that's why the throttle is sticking? It's in cruise control?

Second question. If I take apart the headset to clean everything, how much time should I allow? I don't have a spot where I can leave parts strewn about for days. I'm thinking the driveway and daylight hours is the best I can do. So just a ballpark estimate would be helpful (3 hours? 10 hours?)

Third question. Can someone who has zero experience with mechanics tackle this project? I'd hate to end up with a disaster or a bunch of parts in a box that used to be a scooter as someone so vividly put it.

Thanks for all your help. I didn't really think I'd have to get my hands dirty so soon, but I better just get started.
Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:59 pm quote
GoSlash27 wrote:
kimono,
Real quick 'n' dirty. This should narrow down where your problem is.

http://imgur.com/a/RLpd1

Most likely it's the inner cable, which is easy to replace... but best to be sure.

If you have verified that your cable isn't catching on something in your air box, your throttle slide moves smoothly, and your throttle grip rotates cleanly, then your problem is the cable itself.

In the meantime, you should order a few extra inner cables just in case. A couple spare shifter cables and a couple spare clutch cables. Those can be used to repair every cable on the bike (except the choke).

Best,
-Slashy
This is great! Thanks! I will have more questions when I compare your pics to my bike. Great photos.
Addicted
Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Mon Aug 07, 2017 7:15 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
oopsclunkthud wrote:
Given the problem showed up when the rain started, it's most likely in the headset. There is a thin metal strip that wraps around the throttle tube just inside the bars near the grip. This is only attached on one end and acts as a cruse control (so you can signal with your right hand without dropping the throttle). This strip of metal tightens around the tube when you try and close the throttle and when it does not have any grease or oil on it, it can get extra sticky when it gets a bit wet.
Well, this is all new and intimidating information to me, but I'm going to give it a shot. I've got my manual out and am referring to everything you all have written. First question... the thin metal strip that is there to hold the throttle in place as a type of cruise control--how do you engage that? Have I accidentally engaged it and that's why the throttle is sticking? It's in cruise control?

Second question. If I take apart the headset to clean everything, how much time should I allow? I don't have a spot where I can leave parts strewn about for days. I'm thinking the driveway and daylight hours is the best I can do. So just a ballpark estimate would be helpful (3 hours? 10 hours?)

Third question. Can someone who has zero experience with mechanics tackle this project? I'd hate to end up with a disaster or a bunch of parts in a box that used to be a scooter as someone so vividly put it.

Thanks for all your help. I didn't really think I'd have to get my hands dirty so soon, but I better just get started.
Kimono,

There are a lot of people here with more experience than I have with these bikes, so I always defer to their judgement on the details. *However* I have a whole lot of experience in troubleshooting and mechanical work and am very good at figuring out what's ailing machines and how to make them work properly.
I always recommend a logical, methodical approach to narrowing down exactly what's wrong and then fixing it rather than guessing or assuming.

Accordingly, I recommend that you be sure that the grip is actually the problem before you go to all that trouble. You shouldn't waste time and money fixing things that aren't actually broken (and possibly causing more problems) until the problem goes away. Better to figure out exactly what the problem is *first* and then fix it.

As for the actual doing... Yeah, you can handle it. It's mostly "righty-tighty lefty-loosey" and you have a whole forum of gearheads to help you.

Best,
-Slashy
Banned
2:6
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 7519
Location: San Francisco
Mon Aug 07, 2017 8:15 pm quote
try the wd40 first, it's quick and easy and if that's not the cause there is nothing lost. Pictured below is the most likely points you need to hit (the other end of the tube is good to hit as well). spray a bit, turn the throttle open, spray a bit more turn it closed. repeat a few times and if it's the problem it should resolve it.

IMG_2029.png
under side of the headset, throttle side.

Style Maven
74 50s x3 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special '66(?) Super125 + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7655
Location: seattle/athens
Mon Aug 07, 2017 10:36 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
...
Second question. If I take apart the headset to clean everything, how much time should I allow? I don't have a spot where I can leave parts strewn about for days. I'm thinking the driveway and daylight hours is the best I can do. So just a ballpark estimate would be helpful (3 hours? 10 hours?)

Third question. Can someone who has zero experience with mechanics tackle this project? I'd hate to end up with a disaster or a bunch of parts in a box that used to be a scooter as someone so vividly put it.
...
While you need to be sure the scoot is operating safely, it's summer and time for you you to be mostly riding instead of wrenching. Try the spray lube* from underneath first because it will likely fix the problem well for now. If not, you can go deeper and pull the tube if it still feels sticky - you should be able to tell if the tube feels free but the cable or something else downstream is binding. If you think it's the tube, maybe 3 hours to pull & replace it if all goes well and you get a job sequence list here first. But save it for winter if you can, you should have a nice little list going by then.

*no silicone base spray, please - if anyone ever needed to do any kind of retouch on the paint, they would not be pleased.
Banned
2009 GTS 250, 2013 Buddy 125, 2014 Triumph Bonneville
Joined: 23 Apr 2016
Posts: 2038
Location: North Jersey
Tue Aug 08, 2017 9:57 am quote
Everyone, please stop recommending WD-40 alone. It is not a lubricant. It only has a slight lubricating property while it is wet. And it dries out quickly. You wanna use WD-40, fine. But you need to follow up with a spray lubricant.
Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Tue Aug 08, 2017 10:38 am quote
Okay, I tried spraying Tri Flow under the headset and rolling the throttle all around. At first it seemed to free up a little, but then went back to sticking. It feels like it's kind of grinding right under the handle grip, not a sticky gummy feel, but like metal binding. If I roll the throttle all the way quickly and then let go, it will usually snap back. But if I just roll it a bit, or to any point before full throttle, it stays put. I started it and the throttle is revving the engine as usual, just really revving high as it sticks. I'm thinking this indicates that I have to take it apart. Right? Or maybe the tri flow will magically fix the issue overnight. The pic shows where I feel it grinding. Thanks all for your help. I was hoping for a bit more than 3 miles before I hit a snag....

IMG_2105.JPG

Addicted
Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Tue Aug 08, 2017 1:22 pm quote
Kimono,
Did you disconnect the throttle cable to make sure that the grinding is actually coming from the grip and not the cable?

Best,
-Slashy
Style Maven
74 50s x3 78 P200 84 Cosa 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special '66(?) Super125 + projects
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7655
Location: seattle/athens
Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:36 pm quote
You can partially inspect & lube the throttle tube in under an hour if you don't pull it all the way out. The front brake cable passes through those 'windows' in the tube which is why it has to come out to completely remove.
,
If you pull your headlight, you can see the pulley mounted on the tube end. It's held on by a clip like this:

You can see I've put a point on one to make it easier to reassemble.

This clip may be inside the headlite cavity if your pulleys are like these:


or outside accessible from underneath if you have the longer style like this, Vespa did it both ways depending on the year I suppose:


Once the clip is removed, you can slide the tube out maybe an inch before the brake cable hits the end of the windows. That was enough to partially clean & lube, improving the shifter side on a friend's bike when we had no time to do a full removal. Keep track of the washers stacked against the pulley & get them all back in right.

With the pulley loose, be sure to check the system downstream by just manually pulling the cable and confirming smooth silky action or maybe finding the real problem elsewhere as Slashy has noted.

PS: it seems that on most old Vespas that leaf spring thingy has broken off or been removed because as you may be experiencing they can be a problem if gummy or deformed, and some ppl just don't like them even when they work. Yours may have broken but is still in place w/ the broken edge scraping metal. If so tube part way out & just tug the busted piece off & file any remnant burrs on the tube.

Last edited by V oodoo on Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:49 pm; edited 2 times in total
Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:46 pm quote
GoSlash27 wrote:
Kimono,
Did you disconnect the throttle cable to make sure that the grinding is actually coming from the grip and not the cable?

Best,
-Slashy
Hi Slashy,
No, I didn't check the cable yet. I only had time to squirt the Tri Flow. But let me see if I understand you correctly.

A cable controls the throttle. A frayed or caught cable can cause the stuck throttle. The throttle cable runs from the throttle through the headset and down somewhere under the air filter. The only way to check both ends of the cable is by removing the air filter and removing the headlight. While checking the cable, I should also check the throttle slide. If nothing seems stuck or frayed, just put all the parts back together. It's just so easy, ha ha.

Is this right? I can do this project tomorrow afternoon. Do I need any specific tools besides screwdrivers? I suppose if I find a frayed cable I need a replacement, which I'll need to order unless a hardware/auto store carries them.

And also, does the Tri Flow damage anything if it gets on it? Paint, rubber, vinyl, chrome? I tried to be neat, but yucky black stuff was flowing down the headset a bit.

Many many thanks for helping me.
Addicted
1965 Sears Allstate, 2013 GTS 300 Super i.e.
Joined: 24 Jul 2012
Posts: 597
Location: Bay City, MI
Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:01 pm quote
Kimono32 wrote:
GoSlash27 wrote:
Kimono,
Did you disconnect the throttle cable to make sure that the grinding is actually coming from the grip and not the cable?

Best,
-Slashy
Hi Slashy,
No, I didn't check the cable yet. I only had time to squirt the Tri Flow. But let me see if I understand you correctly.

A cable controls the throttle. A frayed or caught cable can cause the stuck throttle. The throttle cable runs from the throttle through the headset and down somewhere under the air filter. The only way to check both ends of the cable is by removing the air filter and removing the headlight. While checking the cable, I should also check the throttle slide. If nothing seems stuck or frayed, just put all the parts back together. It's just so easy, ha ha.

Is this right? I can do this project tomorrow afternoon. Do I need any specific tools besides screwdrivers? I suppose if I find a frayed cable I need a replacement, which I'll need to order unless a hardware/auto store carries them.

And also, does the Tri Flow damage anything if it gets on it? Paint, rubber, vinyl, chrome? I tried to be neat, but yucky black stuff was flowing down the headset a bit.

Many many thanks for helping me.
Triflow will not harm anything. Just wipe off the excess with a rag. You might be able to find a cable locally at a bicycle shop. You might want to order a set online so if you have one break in the future you are ready to go. Check your casings to see if those are in good shape as you may just want to order both to have those ready to go too.
Addicted
Viet-bodge
Joined: 15 May 2016
Posts: 724
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Tue Aug 08, 2017 3:14 pm quote
Kimono,
Yeah, you'd need a Phillips and standard screwdriver. If your bike is like mine, you will also need a 10mm box wrench.

I like V oodoo's suggestion of starting at the headset end for the inspection instead of the carb end. That way you're not disconnecting anything you don't need to in order to isolate the culprit.

As for the cables, you can order those from Scooterworks. Inner cables are a wear item and need periodic replacement, so it's a good idea to have a few extras on hand even if there's nothing wrong with yours at the moment.
You don't need the entire cable, just the inners. 2 shifter cables and 2 rear brake cables.

Best,
-Slashy
Addicted
Rally 180, li150, P125, p200, p200, p200
Joined: 13 May 2015
Posts: 646
Location: Va
Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:40 am quote
shawn45 wrote:
I also highly suggest looking at Hagerty Classic Auto insurance for this beauty. You can get "Defined Value" policy for very little money. Little Blue there deserves to be respected and you deserve full value in an accident or theft.

My '79 P200 carries $5000 value payout for only $130 a year in cost with no deductibles.

Might also look at a side stand. My wife had similar issues putting her P up on a stand. Side stand was the compromise

Enjoy
I have State Farm and after a short conversation about WHAT these things are, sharing some photos, and coming to a replacement value, I was able to get an agreed value policy for less than 20 bucks a month.
Addicted
Rally 180, li150, P125, p200, p200, p200
Joined: 13 May 2015
Posts: 646
Location: Va
Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:46 am quote
GLOVE TIP:

As someone who rides NSM scoots without turn signals, I rely heavily on old fashioned hand signals. To that end, I found a set of bright white armored gloves in the sport bike apparel section of the local shop, and they have made a huge difference in people noticing my signals.
Addicted
1974VLB 1979VSX 1974V9A
Joined: 12 Sep 2014
Posts: 668

Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:42 am quote
I have an idea about increasing night time visibility

IMG_7688.JPG

Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:14 pm quote
Just spent some delightful time in my garage this afternoon. Took a few things apart and learned a little bit about how Blue works. I didn't get very far though, because I can't figure out how to disconnect stuff without forcing it. So I have a few questions for the experts...

I'm trying to loosen the throttle tube a little bit to clean it and possibly remove a broken metal "leaf spring thingy". But I can't figure out how to loosen the throttle tube.

I found what I think is the "pulley clip" but it looks impossible to remove. See pic for where I think it is located (not in the headlight cavity). My pulleys look like the first picture V oodoo showed, not the longer ones.

Then, inside the headlight, I see the pulley, but it is connected to a washer maybe, by a little metal foot. Do I just force the foot out of the pulley slot? I feel like I will bend something if I do that.

The cable seems to pull smoothly, didn't see any fraying. I did not check the carb end, ran out of time.

Even putting the headlight back in place and balancing it on the little clip while tightening the nut was challenging for this novice. I definitely need more time and more patience.

Thanks,
Greasy Fingernails

IMG_2126.JPG

Addicted
'66 Super 150
Joined: 11 Jul 2017
Posts: 523
Location: MN
Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:15 pm quote
Pulley clip?

IMG_2131.JPG

Scooting the Ozarks is a scooter rally held in Eureka Springs, Arkansas offering riders scenic twisty rides, poker run, and more.   Vespa Wasp Pin Badges   Yelcome Leather Top Cases and Roll Bags for Piaggio Vespa PX LX LXV GTS GTV
Post Reply    Forum -> Not-So-Modern Previous123...192021Next
[ Time: 0.3083s ][ Queries: 25 (0.0701s) ][ Debug on ]