Meet "Buffy"
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Molto Verboso
Vespas 1964 GS160, 1965 SS180, 1977 V9A1T, 1983 PX150E
Joined: 16 Apr 2011
Posts: 1059
Location: Siam
Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:36 pm quote
Gt6MK3 wrote:
The old story about a bacon and egg sanger is that the chicken is involved, but the pig is committed.

The Ginsu knives came out in earnest on Friday, and Buffy moved from involved to genuinely comitted.

Radical liposuction first, as she lost the weight off her hips.



Then it was time for some speed holes spot weld unpicking



Lots of speed holes unpicking.



Not all the work was neat, some was very much meatball surgery...



But finally, after a fight, I got her major only cancer free section out in one reasonably tidy and intact piece.



By beer o'clock, I'd harvested everything Buffy's body had to give (her steering tube was elsewhere having the steering lock boss tig'd back together after someone in the past tried to get a lock out with what looks on evidence to be a large and quite angry chainsaw).



and poor Buffy's scarred and rotted panels lay discarded and disconsolate on the floor, rusting quietly.

I see no logical reason for cutting the cowls off. It's even more of a butchered mess than it was to begin with. Wouldn't an acid dip or thorough bead blast have done what is necessary? Have fun though; always have fun.
Molto Verboso
Joined: 26 Oct 2015
Posts: 1381

Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:50 pm quote
An acid dip won't always get all of the rust between the seams. It can also be very difficult to neutralize all of the acid that gets between some of the seams after it gets dipped. After a bit (as in, after you get the scoot back from painting) the acid can slowly leach back out, causing the paint to blister up.

I usually remove as much of the rust damaged areas as possible first, then do a acid dip. Sometime you have to pry the seams apart a little bit so acid can get in there.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
a not so normal vbb2 '64, a weirdo vbx '86 and a not so normal pts100 '82
Joined: 15 Jun 2009
Posts: 5384
Location: Indo
Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:56 pm quote
this is seriousy wicked.. it make my patch weld restoration look like a child play

but i am enjoying this as much as everyone and curious bout the result so keep the pics coming and cheer
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Wed May 02, 2018 6:57 am quote
Cleaning up the steering tube was a chore,



but nothing compared to getting the remains of the old spine out of the inside of the top bracket. That one little strip cost me two hours I’ll never get back!



But, after lot of head scratching, an hour or two of swearing, out it came.

Suddenly, the tear down was totally complete.

Time for Buffy’s renaissance to begin.

So after a good soak of weld through primer, more hitting and bending, more swearing, lots of tweaking, and a few deep breaths, the steering tube got lined up on the laser and tacked into the new spine.


It's a nice solid start.

Craig
Molto Verboso
Joined: 26 Oct 2015
Posts: 1381

Wed May 02, 2018 1:07 pm quote
I was wondering why the welds on your jig were so overkill, but now it's making more sense. Keep it up! I'm enjoying reading your thread almost as much as your pics!
Ossessionato
I have a few scooters....
Joined: 08 Nov 2005
Posts: 2198
Location: San Antonio, TX
Wed May 02, 2018 6:03 pm quote
So, I have to ask....Did you name it "Buffy" because "that will buff right out"?
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Wed May 02, 2018 8:17 pm quote
That’s exactly why.

(The fact she’ll be a small, curvaceous, innocent looking vampire killer when she’s finished sealed it)
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 6844
Location: Victoria, Australia
Wed May 02, 2018 8:39 pm quote
Gt6MK3 wrote:
That’s exactly why.

(The fact she’ll be a small, curvaceous, beer drinking innocent looking vampire killer when she’s finished sealed it)
Fixed that for you!


Beer good....
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Thu May 03, 2018 5:47 am quote
Slow day today, but got to the factory after work and got the bracing ready for install



Then Mat hit it with the hot glue gun and plug welded it into place.



Slow progress, but progress
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Fri May 04, 2018 4:23 am quote
Marrying replacement parts with originals comes with challenges. The steering lock cutout on the new spine was in completely the wrong spot, and had to be extended and enlarged to allow for fitting the column. That left a bloody great hole, which wasn't exactly shaped like the grommet that closed up the hole the factory use to utilise then leave.

I made up a patch to fill the void.



I figured the column isn't going to be coming out anytime soon, so there's no need for a hole and grommet when metal is available instead.



That will be no fun to grind back and pretty up, not looking forward to it, but that's the price of making my OCD happy somedays. (Maybe I should go rat-rod after all...)

We finished up all the welding for the standard bracing. It still needs cleaning, but with the plug welds, and the number of them, it's probably stronger now than when it left the factory.



Currently deciding if I put in more bracing - leading towards bending up some 10mm rod and running it from front to back in the top corners of the spine. I could peirce it through the pressed braces without compromising them, and it would add plenty of stiffness with negligible weight penalty.

Now that the spine is solid, I test fitted the new rear cowl pieces.



They're going to take some fettling to fit, but they should work fine. She's taking shape.

Beer o'clock...



Last edited by Gt6MK3 on Fri May 04, 2018 4:48 am; edited 1 time in total
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 6844
Location: Victoria, Australia
Fri May 04, 2018 4:42 am quote
Looking good!
Ossessionato
05 Stella, '62 VBB, 76 Sprint V, 63 GL
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 2037
Location: Chicago. Well, Evanston, but that's almost Chicago
Fri May 04, 2018 5:19 am quote
This is one of the more amazing threads I've seen here in a while.

Not just the volume of work you're doing, but also the speed at which you're accomplishing it.

Keep the updates coming!

Molto Verboso
Vespas 1964 GS160, 1965 SS180, 1977 V9A1T, 1983 PX150E
Joined: 16 Apr 2011
Posts: 1059
Location: Siam
Sat May 05, 2018 9:14 am quote
It is truly impressive, but I don't understand the point of doing all the cutting and hacking on the old frame. What part of it has been re-used? All the fresh panels look like new parts you have purchased. Are you not taking new parts and assembling a new frame?
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 6844
Location: Victoria, Australia
Sat May 05, 2018 1:17 pm quote
nomadinsiam wrote:
Are you not taking new parts and assembling a new frame?
Well who wouldn't want a new frame? And you still need a frame number to register it.
Molto Verboso
Vespas 1964 GS160, 1965 SS180, 1977 V9A1T, 1983 PX150E
Joined: 16 Apr 2011
Posts: 1059
Location: Siam
Sun May 06, 2018 2:16 am quote
Ginch wrote:
nomadinsiam wrote:
Are you not taking new parts and assembling a new frame?
Well who wouldn't want a new frame? And you still need a frame number to register it.
That's not my point. I don't understand why he even bothered doing all the cutting and rustling around with the old rusted out shell. Why not simply transfer the old frame number into all the new sheet metal pieces that he's bought. Yeah, it's cool, but I think about the first 2/3 of the labor was unnecessary.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
a herd of easy shifty rats
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 6793
Location: seattle/athens
Sun May 06, 2018 8:52 am quote
where's Buffy?
This is a hardcore rebuild if ever I saw one, and it seems to me also that it passed the point of diminishing returns if I was doing it. But to each his own and there is obviously a lot of joy, learning and dedication going on here. Could have been done repairing the back half as needed I suppose rather than replacing it, but I haven't seen it and this will likely be better. Sometimes you just do stuff because you can.

I asked earlier about this and I think most of the answers are clear now.
Quote:
... which pieces will be:
A) preserved and 100% from original Buffy
B) ordered new from a supplier of body & frame parts
C) you will need to fabricate portions and repair old parts
D) you will need to fabricate something new from scratch
So where's Buffy? She's right here plus the rebuilt fork tube, soon to join the new panels:

And of course most of her motor and running gear will survive and be reworked in interesting ways if what we've already seen is any clue .
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Mon May 07, 2018 6:29 am quote
Nomad,

I'm not sure if

(a) Your offended 'cos you consider her a bodge, or
(b) Your puzzled why I didn't save the spine and rear outer panels, or
(c) You think I'm wasting my time, and should have just used new everything and saved time.

If it's (a), then it's a fair argument, and one that I have little defence for. Some people will probably think that, hopefully not everyone. All I can say is that given her condition, this is the best redemption I can think of, short of Colt.45's suggestion.

If (b), then lets start with her spine. It was rusted through (not rusted, rusted through) in more than one place, and rusted badly in structural spots. I'm planning fun and exciting things for her engine, so I didn't want to be trusting a patchwork spine. Of the outer panel, the off side panel was rusted and holed in the complex curve that goes from under the choke around to the flange below, all along the flange to the engine mount, and a 2-3" strip on the bottom of the cowl right round to the join with the engine side, including all the area bead around the cowl base. The engine side was marginally salvageable, but was holed on that same complex curve, and all along the flange. I haven't even mentioned the legshield, the photo's speak for themselves.

Before I took the legshield off, I shopped at SC for a shield, a spine, and two new rear panels. I hoped I'd just be using them to cut up for parts, but once the true condition of the spine was revealed, I knew it had to come out. SC sell a spine with a fork tube and re-enforcements, but it's b-stock, and looks crap. That meant Buffy's original tube had to come out, ditto the reinforcement pressings. That's why I built the jig, so I could put it back in on the right angle and rake, at the right height.

Could I have got the spine out with the rear section intact? Umm, possibly. The outer guards are spotwelded to the spine along the outside flange, and across the skirt. The inner guard/shockmount section is attached to the inner walls of the spine, and the floor flange. Given the amount of rust in the flanges, unpicking the outside was going to be a nightmare, and if I cut it off over the skirt, I'd have cut my repair template in two. I'd also have still had rust across both panels under the choke, right around the base of the offside cowl, and the top of the engine side cowl, and as it turns out, in the rear seam. I was also worried I'd deform or destroy the inner fender section, which looked to be in great condition other than some surface rust.

So I chose to concentrate on salvaging the inner section, then harvesting all the flanges and other bits I could. Would I have prefer to have saved it all? Sure. But I'm taking up a workbay in a mate's factory, and have to balance pragmatism with wishes and ponies. I have to live within my skillset, I had the panels, and those complex curves looked bloody scary..

As for option (c), I could have just written down the frame number, thrown Buffy in the crusher, and started a thread called "Meet Shiny", but that wouldn't be as much fun. I'm learning as I go, and hopefully I'll have a nice scoot with the essence of Buffy's soul mostly intact when I'm done.

Last edited by Gt6MK3 on Mon May 07, 2018 7:40 am; edited 1 time in total
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Mon May 07, 2018 6:49 am quote
Given that a 50s rolled out of the factory with a solid 2.6 horsepower, and Buffy will have (ahem) one or two more, I figured that reinforcing the spine was worth considering.

I originally thought about inserting some box sections into the spine, but I didn't want to foul the cables or wiring. Than I considered cutting and folding reinforcements to go along the inner walls, but the complexity and weight penalty were to big.

Eventually, I bent up some 10mm barstock to follow the inner curves at the top corners of the spine from the base to the steering tube.

Having pierced the mid spine brace, these fitted in nicely.



So we stitch welded them along either side, and laddered them for maximum bracing strength.



Negligible weight penalty for plenty o'strong, and tucked up out of the way.
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Tue May 08, 2018 4:31 am quote
After Marine Clean and Metal Ready, the interior of the spine got masked up, and hit with a couple of coats of POR15



Hopefully the masking all held, 'cos this stuff is a bitch to get off, but there should be no rust appearing inside the spine for a good long while.
Molto Verboso
Vespas 1964 GS160, 1965 SS180, 1977 V9A1T, 1983 PX150E
Joined: 16 Apr 2011
Posts: 1059
Location: Siam
Wed May 09, 2018 3:41 am quote
Gt6MK3 wrote:
Nomad,

I'm not sure if

(a) Your offended 'cos you consider her a bodge, or
(b) Your puzzled why I didn't save the spine and rear outer panels, or
(c) You think I'm wasting my time, and should have just used new everything
(d) Not offended as it's not my frame, but rather amused. I just thought that cutting the cowls off the rear section of the frame was kind of a waste. To each his own. It is surely on it's way to being a different, but well-built frame.
Molto Verboso
Vespas 1964 GS160, 1965 SS180, 1977 V9A1T, 1983 PX150E
Joined: 16 Apr 2011
Posts: 1059
Location: Siam
Wed May 09, 2018 3:45 am quote
Gt6MK3 wrote:
After Marine Clean and Metal Ready, the interior of the spine got masked up, and hit with a couple of coats of POR15



Hopefully the masking all held, 'cos this stuff is a bitch to get off, but there should be no rust appearing inside the spine for a good long while.
I must say that in fifty years someone will discover this and say "What the fook is this!?" I say fifty because more than likely it will last that long or longer.
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Wed May 09, 2018 4:16 am quote
Cheers, it would be nice if my OCD would let me get it done faster though(the way I'm going, feel like it's going to take 50 years).

I do have a plan for one of those cowls...

Unmasked the spine tonight, then spent a couple of hours wire wheeling all the metal that should be forming metal to metal seams. I do not like wire wheeling. As usual, I got to pick about 20 wires out of my shirt and jeans. The fun one was the one that bounced up and hit me inside my right nostril!. Safety glasses (the bi-focal type for old farts), gloves, bluetooth earmuffs, nothing prepared me for that one.

I remembered that the copper based weld through primer didn't play well with my spot welder last time I used it, so all the seams got hit with some cold gal weldthru, hopefully this will work.

Molto Verboso
1979 P150X, 1983 P200E, 1987 T5, 1996 PX200E, 2011 Yamaha Fazer 600 S2
Joined: 02 Aug 2015
Posts: 1432
Location: Veria, Greece
Wed May 09, 2018 7:04 am quote
Amazing skills and work so far!!! If I were in your shoes, I'd use the Teroson EP 5055 on all the seams. It works with spot welding and it's being used in automotive industry for all structural bonding applications. I used it recently on a safety recall, that Piaggio is currently running in the EU market and it's really great. It comes with a special mixing syringe that gradually mixes properly, the two "agents"...

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 6844
Location: Victoria, Australia
Wed May 09, 2018 6:52 pm quote
That's impressive stuff. Especially that you can spot weld through it.

A friend used he Sikaflex stuff designed for automotive assembly to attach a horncast to a VBB with new legshields. A few years and thousands of k's later it hasn't moved. Sticks like shit to a blanket.
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Thu May 10, 2018 5:13 am quote
That looks awesome stuff. Tried to buy some here today, but at all the usual suspects it's at least a week wait to get it, or it's sikaflex equivalent. If I can get some quicker I'll give it a try.

Time to start adding back Buffy's curves. My main datum point for the rear is the engine mounting holes at the base of the fenders/rear of the spine, so I needed a way to positively locate everything while I work with them.

My buddy Alans away, but I snuck up to his workshop and hit the lathe



Turned up these locating pins to go into the jig so I could positively locate the fenders with the spine. 16mm on the outer, 10mm inners, with an 8mm centre (I can run some 8mm all thread through this with oversize washers to clamp.)



I offered up the spine to the jig. Adding the strengthening ladder has really stiffened it up, but either it had tweaked it ever so slightly, or (more likely) I had been using the previous slight flex to get it in the jig. Either way, it did not quite fit, and it did NOT want to be moved back easily to line up that last couple of mm.



That one, and the one on the other side took over an hour and a half of F-clamps, F-words, and then a F-ing big lever before Mat and I convinced them to play fair.

Once the spine was finally in place and I was able to put the locating pins through it and the jig, it took much less persuasion for the fenders to go over them.



So the clamp fest began





I've mocked this up before, but it's nice to be adding back her curves for real



These two however, are going to need some convincing before they're happy to marry up level with each other.



The battle continues
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Fri May 11, 2018 6:04 am quote
Some days it's one step forward, two steps back, no steps forward..

I could put on as many clamps as I liked, but these two fenders really didn't want to marry.





And when I slid in the inner wheelarch/shockmount, it was obvious I was on the wrong track trying to do it this way.



So I went back to the photos and datums I'd taken, and decided to try to set the inner section first, then look at the fenders. 

So off they came, and out it came. 

Two steps back.

I set the inner section up, datumed it as much as I could, and we tacked it in.



Setting up the laser showed it's pretty close. 



Not perfect, not right, but getting there.  No steps forward.

Time to step away for a day or three.
Hooked
2006 Tomos LX (sold), 2006 Piaggio Fly 150 (sold), 2008 and 2016 Honda Mets (sold), 2017 Buddy 125, 2006 Vespa GTS250ie
Joined: 07 Jan 2018
Posts: 161
Location: Colorado
Fri May 11, 2018 6:04 pm quote
This entire thread brings a tear to my eye. Not sure if it's respect, phantom metal shavings, or both.
Molto Verboso
Vespas 1964 GS160, 1965 SS180, 1977 V9A1T, 1983 PX150E
Joined: 16 Apr 2011
Posts: 1059
Location: Siam
Sat May 12, 2018 8:14 pm quote
Blipvert wrote:
This entire thread brings a tear to my eye. Not sure if it's respect, phantom metal shavings, or both.
I agree. Regardless of what I think about the practicality of the project, it is very professional and precise. As soon as those poorly fitting panels showed their ugly faces, I would have dropped everything is despair. Those gaps between the floor channel and the rear halves look to be a nightmare. He's got the fancy tools and knowledge of machining, so it looks like it will all work out.
Hooked
74 v90/100 smallframe, 1974 primavera 125 (getting there), 80 P200E,
Joined: 18 Jul 2008
Posts: 252
Location: San Diego
Sat May 12, 2018 9:24 pm quote
Looking good man. Patience is a virtue, so they say.

Looking forward to your progress with this project.
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Fri May 18, 2018 3:54 am quote
Needed to stop and rethink how these panels can be made to fit together, so I took a few days off, and concentrated on my nerdy day job till inspiration struck..

Went back today and decided that it was time to flip the problem on its head, and use the seat/body bolt holes as references. (Aussies of a certain age will understand when I say it was an "Upside down Miss Jane" moment).

After lots of measuring, marking and re-measuring, I welded up this plate.



That let me put the old carcass up



Which let me mark out where everything goes.



and with the centreline the positioning of the new panel shows itself



The back end marries up pretty well



but the front end, is, well, (Can I say "fucked" on here?)...



Oh, and these should be in the same plane and will "need work" too.



I think the plate will make this do-able, but only time will tell...
Veni, Vidi, Posti
a herd of easy shifty rats
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 6793
Location: seattle/athens
Fri May 18, 2018 8:19 am quote
Quite the challenge but looks like you have a good plan and aren't giving up. I wonder why they don't match a lot better?
Quote:
(Can I say "fucked" on here?)
In this case, yes you can.

I wonder what shipping from Providence, Rhode Island would be? Too bad this isn't closer, would be perfect for you. http://modernvespa.com/forum/post2240514#2240514

Veni, Vidi, Posti
a herd of easy shifty rats
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 6793
Location: seattle/athens
Fri May 18, 2018 12:02 pm quote
Geez, after watching this all unfold, I'm kind of reluctant to stick my nose in, but something's not right.

After reviewing your alignment problem, it seems to me that the best place to start could be back here again where the flanges at the front are located properly, edges match and then try to bend the left side down and the right side up. Looks like you'd be in for some stretching & slight crushing to get the gas tank mount area flat, but the part that meets the floor & spine with the engine mount has to work.

I know you can do it one way or another, please ask for any dimensions or other help you might need.
Ossessionato
1976 Super (x 2), 1974 Primavera (x 2), 2006 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 4603
Location: So Cal
Fri May 18, 2018 1:45 pm quote
On the bright side, that seat looks totally repairable.

Yo modkuo, how much you think it would cost to ship your camo frame to an Aussie brother?
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 6844
Location: Victoria, Australia
Fri May 18, 2018 4:41 pm quote
Geez that's a long way out isn't it?

I know so far you have tried aligning them from the front and now from the back, but I'm not sure you actually have that choice. Looking at the last picture of the front of the two halves I realised you can only align them around the engine mount holes. That's where the functional bit needs to trump the visuals...
I can't see how this is going to work without cutting slices from one side or the other, which sucks.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
a herd of easy shifty rats
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 6793
Location: seattle/athens
Fri May 18, 2018 5:31 pm quote
Slicing?
Maybe, but I remain optimistic. Those panels are pretty flimsy at this point and hopefully when both are solidly anchored at the bottom front, then tacked going up to the front of the gas tank opening - that you might be then able to pull, push, twist, warp, stretch, slightly crush and otherwise wrestle the two main panels into a better match.

The 2 engine mount holes will determine the centerline of the wheel and the shock mount hole only needs to be in the right neighborhood, as it only sets the wheel mount height. A quarter inch right or left or back or forward of nominal for the shock top mount shouldn't make much difference. Likewise for the center seam of the body if it turns out that way and if you can tolerate it. I agree that guessing at slices would be no fun.


Match this up the best you can starting at the other end, then bring in the top to flat to your jig and so it fits your gas tank OK.

Sorry for all the probably uneeded advice, but I just want to come right over there to see for myself and see if I could help out.
Molto Verboso
Vespas 1964 GS160, 1965 SS180, 1977 V9A1T, 1983 PX150E
Joined: 16 Apr 2011
Posts: 1059
Location: Siam
Fri May 18, 2018 5:38 pm quote
V oodoo wrote:
Quite the challenge but looks like you have a good plan and aren't giving up. I wonder why they don't match a lot better?
Quote:
(Can I say "fucked" on here?)
In this case, yes you can.

I wonder what shipping from Providence, Rhode Island would be? Too bad this isn't closer, would be perfect for you. http://modernvespa.com/forum/post2240514#2240514

Haha!!! What a novel concept, a different frame. Why didn't we think of that before?
Most reproduction panels fit very poorly. Even a simple reproduction mudguard I had from a reputable company was friggin' wonked out of proportion. I got rid of it and waited for an original to come along. He can do it, but is all the time and energy involved really worth it? It's educational is all.
I wish him the best of luck.
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Thu May 24, 2018 6:22 am quote
A new frame? Nah - that'd be cheating. The whole point of taking this on was to see if I could stretch my skills (and the odd friendship) to rebuild Buffy. If I get to the end and I can't make it right, I'll just have to keep trying...

Mat's factory has been bursting at the seams with work, so I haven't had much opportunity to get in there and get in the way this week. It's a 45 minute drive each way, so I try to make sure I get something done whenever I go, but the couple of times I went this week I was mostly dithering and wondering if I was on the right path. Mat's been flat stick with work, so I have been trying to keep out of his way. Got off work early this afternoon and decided to suck it up and get serious on my own.

I decided to follow my gut and get the top end shaped so I can work down from there. I have a plan for making it all come together, and I reckon this is the way forward.

The offside (non-engine side) is closest to fitting, and is the outer seam for all the joins, so I started with it. I lined it up, then plug welded in the seat/tank brace. Then, with the fender held in place on the jig plate, I screwed through the rear bolt, so it marked up where the bolt came through. After drilling that out, I was able to bolt down the rear, so I repeated that at the front. (Sounds simple, is simple, once you commit to actually drilling holes in you new fender. Dither time - 2.5 hours...)

Now one fender was held in place at 3 points.

The seatpost bolt at the rear of the seat area is common to both fenders and the inner guard/shockmount, so it was a logical place to start to work my way out. I measured twice (maybe 4 times), and drilled and filed the engine side to match the offside.

Now I could start to build.

I drilled a plate to act as a load spreader at the rear, and bolted it all up.

Sounds simple, but a week of worry and a lot of dithering went into getting to this point...



That worked pretty well at the rear - there's still a small amount of work to do to dressing the curves, but it looks pretty good right off the bat.



The front is still out by a country mile though. Its short by a few mm, and pushed almost half an inch over the centerline.



That was always going to need some serious persuading. So... I bolted in the engine side tank/set brace as a guide, and welded a big fat bit of angle iron to the jig plate



Then I deployed some serious weaponry, Mat's hydraulic ram.



Which entered the argument like a junkie wielding a double barrelled sawed off wandering into a room with some nerds playing a game of rock-paper-scissors.

What a few days ago was this



very quickly became this





Which, while not perfect, is a lot closer.

I needed to leave and go to an old buddys wake, so that may be all the progress for this week, but I think its looking a lot more like success may be obtainable.

Good progress after a shitty week.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 6844
Location: Victoria, Australia
Thu May 24, 2018 2:32 pm quote
Amazing. I keep imagining the carnage if I was doing it!
Ossessionato
2 matching N.Z. '69 VBC Super, 177cc Racer, VespaCross Bodge, Puch SRA150, Piaggio Zip 100! & others
Joined: 26 May 2013
Posts: 3755
Location: Millbin, Ostrayleea, mate
Thu May 24, 2018 3:36 pm quote
Paperwork
Never fear, I have not (yet) forgotten to get paperwork to you... Ginchi also keeps reminding me (I have a poor poor memory).
I’ll dig out the paperwork & all original photos & history that I have for Buffy... currently the Mother-in-Law is staying in my office (come bedroom), so I’ll wait till she goes out to do a covert recovery mission & find a USB to put them on... plus will have to wait for partner to scan import approval...

I’m stoked that someone is actually getting it going again. I brought it from photos alone & from a different country!
Hooked
Bodgerific 150 Super, 50s in progress
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 210
Location: Melbourne, Way Downunder
Fri May 25, 2018 4:37 am quote
Thanks a bunch S.E.B.!

I left the ram in the engine side overnight, and after some more stretching, I was able to mark, drill, and bolt down the nose at last



Looks easy, but I reckon it took an hour before I committed to location of that 7mm hole. Measure 7 times, drill once...

The two panels were still a very long way from meeting on the curve though.



Time to profit from all the time I've wasted watching Futureama.

Use the clamps Clamps!!!

nomadinsiam wrote:
He's got the fancy tools and knowledge of machining, so it looks like it will all work out.
I can't tell you how much that made me laugh. I'm a computer nerd who muddles through using whatever is to hand, and occasionally gets to use his friends workshops.

Todays fancy tool? After a beer, and a bit of head scratching, I went to the hardware store and spent 12 bucks on a 3/16" drill bit, and pack of 3/16" x 15mm nuts and bolts.

Again it was hard to commit to the first hole, but it all started to come together really quickly, and really nicely.



After a long game of clampdrillboltclampdrillboltclampdrillbolt, it came together beautifully.



I never thought it would all line up so nicely! Couldn't help myself, even though theres still clamps everywhere, I had to have a look



I reckon I'm on track



Beautiful autumn weekend coming, so I'm going skydiving, but if things keep working, there's light coming at the end of Buffy's tunnel.

Last edited by Gt6MK3 on Fri May 25, 2018 5:09 am; edited 3 times in total
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