New MP3 convert in Australia
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Member
Piaggio MP3 250 e
Joined: 04 Dec 2018
Posts: 22
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:59 pm quote
Good day! Is this the place to introduce myself?
Anyway, I am a recent convert to the joy of an MP3 after riding motorbikes of all descriptions for 65+ years. As I am approaching 'mature age' at 78, I feel something a little more 'sedate' may be appropriate.
I found a lovely 2008 vintage MP3 with just 6700km ridden. After standing for many years this machine was a little 'sluggish'. First thing I did was give it a good service, paying attention to the usual 'filters and fluids'. A new rear tyre was also called for, which introduced me to the concept of 'Italian design' that seems to conspire to make things as complicated as possible! Don't MP3's get rear wheel punctures? Maybe slip over the border to Munich and get some tips on good design!
My scoot also had difficulty with maintaining idle speed, which appears to be a common problem. (That is how I found this forum). I tried the easy fix first, namely replace the stale petrol with fresh 95 octane, with a dash of injector nozzle cleaner, and wash the air filter. The filter pad was heavily impregnated with some sticky goo not unlike syrup that had fouled the air intake tube with black tar-like gunk that was difficult and messy to clean out.
Now the motor runs sweetly and consistently (a bit clattery though - valve clearance too wide perhaps?) and no longer cuts out every time I stop. The yellow engine icon still keeps winking at me. Why?
Overall I find the MP3 fun to ride, although not as well balanced as a regular motorcycle, probably because of all that heavy hardware up front which tends to make it feel somewhat top heavy. I do love that 'look ma, no feet on the ground' feature that tends to flummox people in their cars. Happy riding!
Member
MP3 500
Joined: 30 Nov 2018
Posts: 6
Location: Arizona
Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:50 pm quote
Here is my plan....despite the recommendations to start on something smaller....I am not going to listen even tho I know you guys are probably right.


I will start with training classes on smaller bike then when ready...go to the MP3

QUESTION : every one says the MP3 is top heavy...why is that when all the motor ,etc . is on the bottom ?
Member
MP3 500
Joined: 30 Nov 2018
Posts: 6
Location: Arizona
Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:52 pm quote
also ...to bad you are in Australia...be un to ride with a " mature " rider
Hooked
Piaggio MP3 500
Joined: 21 Nov 2017
Posts: 134
Location: Austin, TX
Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:25 pm quote
Welcome to the wonderful world of the MP3, Breitie!

On my bike, there is a yellow icon that winks at me when I'm travelling less than 6 MPH, but that's the indicator that tells me I can lock the front end up. Does it go solid when you lock the wheels and extinguish at higher speeds? Then that's the same light.

Not to hijack the thread, but the MP3 is not necessarily top-heavy, but it is actually HEAVY! It just feels top-heavy because the tipping-point balance feels fairly light when balanced, but when it exceeds a certain angle, the real weight catches up to you, and that's when it falls over. I think it's from the geometry of the pivot in front not being on the ground, but higher up in the steering mechanism.
Member
Piaggio MP3 250 e
Joined: 04 Dec 2018
Posts: 22
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Tue Dec 04, 2018 8:58 pm quote
Thanks for your quick responses to my initial post. I feel welcome already!
Squeazel, the yellow light winking at me is the one with the engine icon, that has to do with fuel and fuel injection, not the front wheel locking light.
And regarding the weight and 'top-heavy' feel, it is indeed because of the high pivot of the front suspension hardware. Thanks for your thoughts.
Enthusiast
Piaggio MP3 250, BigBeo
Joined: 30 May 2015
Posts: 89
Location: Chelyabinsk, Russia
Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:57 pm quote
What's wrong with rear wheel design? Removing muffler, a nut and several screws, while mp3's on centerstand once per several years ain't look too complicated

Last edited by Jah on Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:29 pm; edited 1 time in total
Member
Piaggio MP3 250 e
Joined: 04 Dec 2018
Posts: 22
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:29 pm quote
Jah wrote:
What's wrong with rear wheel design? Removing muffler, a nut and several screws on centerstand once per several years ain't look too complicated
Ha ha Mr. Jah, the way you describe the operation it is clear that you have never attempted it. Besides find me a rear tyre that lasts 'several years'! Even without the possibility of a puncture, ever. However, I notice that you have your tongue firmly tucked into your cheek and accept your comment in the spirit intended.
Enthusiast
Piaggio MP3 250, BigBeo
Joined: 30 May 2015
Posts: 89
Location: Chelyabinsk, Russia
Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:27 pm quote
Nah, did that several times, including conversion to 14" instead of 12" and finally migrated to darkside. All done by my own, without anyone's assistance.
Member
Piaggio MP3 250 e
Joined: 04 Dec 2018
Posts: 22
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:25 pm quote
Thanks for the photo Mr. Jah. Where or what is 'the dark side'? I notice that you are in Russia. Also, interesting tyre you have there. Almost like a car tyre and not really suited for a motorcycle that needs to lean over?
Ossessionato
MP3 500, GTS 250 (both 2008 MY), 2010 Can Am Spyder RT-S, 2012 Honda NC700 DCT
Joined: 02 Mar 2013
Posts: 4763
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:39 pm quote
Breitie wrote:
Thanks for the photo Mr. Jah. Where or what is 'the dark side'? I notice that you are in Russia. Also, interesting tyre you have there. Almost like a car tyre and not really suited for a motorcycle that needs to lean over?
"Darkside" is the installation of a car tire to the rear of a motorcycle.

And by the way, your comment a bit higher on this thread:
"Mr. Jah, the way you describe the operation it is clear that you have never attempted it. Besides find me a rear tyre that lasts 'several years'!"
Careful where you accuse others of falsehoods.
Not meaning to step on Mr Jah's toes here, but removal of the rear wheel is accurately described, with simplification.
Member
Piaggio MP3 250 e
Joined: 04 Dec 2018
Posts: 22
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:53 pm quote
Thank you Madison Sully for your very helpful comment. I consider myself chastised and enlightened. No wonder tyres on 'the dark side' last 'several years. That is one way of avoiding more frequent cumbersome tyre changes I suppose but would affect the quality and safety of the ride?
Ossessionato
MP3 500, GTS 250 (both 2008 MY), 2010 Can Am Spyder RT-S, 2012 Honda NC700 DCT
Joined: 02 Mar 2013
Posts: 4763
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Wed Dec 05, 2018 1:45 pm quote
Breitie wrote:
No wonder tyres on 'the dark side' last 'several years. That is one way of avoiding more frequent cumbersome tyre changes I suppose but would affect the quality and safety of the ride?
I can't speak from experience here, as I have never been to that particular dark side.
But I can say I hear the tires last a LOT longer. I get ~8000-9000 miles on my MP3500 rears, and hear of dark-siders getting more like 20,000.
Someone with actual knowledge will likely chime in shortly.

As to safety, you'll hear anything from they work better, to don't worry about it, to the sky will certainly fall (that latter usually from someone with no actual experience with it).

I have also heard it is difficult to seat even closely matched tires; take care if you go this route to have the tire seated properly. Which can take a very high pressure.

Anyway, from my own experience at the miles stated, I'm content to change out my tires with Michelin City Grips. They're good, and at ~40,000 miles I've rather gotten used to them.
Member
Piaggio MP3 250 e
Joined: 04 Dec 2018
Posts: 22
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Wed Dec 05, 2018 2:23 pm quote
Thanks again Madison Sully, for your valuable advice. I find it amusing that people fit car tyres to their scooter in order to avoid having to change them more often, and then claim how easy it is to do.
I certainly would not contemplate fitting car tyres to a motorcycle that is designed to lean and besides, my insurance would be invalidated if I did that.
Did you say 40,000 miles on Michelin City Grips? That is car mileage surely.
Ossessionato
MP3 500, GTS 250 (both 2008 MY), 2010 Can Am Spyder RT-S, 2012 Honda NC700 DCT
Joined: 02 Mar 2013
Posts: 4763
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Wed Dec 05, 2018 2:38 pm quote
Breitie wrote:
Thanks again Madison Sully, for your valuable advice. I find it amusing that people fit car tyres to their scooter in order to avoid having to change them more often, and then claim how easy it is to do.
I certainly would not contemplate fitting car tyres to a motorcycle that is designed to lean and besides, my insurance would be invalidated if I did that.
Did you say 40,000 miles on Michelin City Grips? That is car mileage surely.
I should clarify; 40,000 miles on 5 Michelin City Grips.
Member
Piaggio MP3 250 e
Joined: 04 Dec 2018
Posts: 22
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Wed Dec 05, 2018 4:26 pm quote
WoW! Sully. Is that your name? Can I call you that?
Anyway, your'e messin' with my mind there! Forty thou on a scooter tyre seemed a bit out of this world. Thanks for clarifying that it is actually eight thou per tyre. Still very good mileage. Perhaps you are a careful rider?
I had a look at the Michelin City Grips. Also very common here it seems. I like the solid ridge in the middle for better wear on straight runs.
My new rear tyre is a 130/70/12 Pirelli SL26 and was recommended by the Piaggio dealer, actually was the only one they had. I thought Pirelli and Piaggio are made for each other and should be ok.
I must mention that in the three days that I have been on this Forum I have already learned a lot. Thanks guys. Breite
Member
Piaggio MP3 250 e
Joined: 04 Dec 2018
Posts: 22
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Wed Dec 05, 2018 4:30 pm quote
Jah wrote:
Nah, did that several times, including conversion to 14" instead of 12" and finally migrated to darkside. All done by my own, without anyone's assistance.
Breviet Mr. Jah, I hope I did not offend you with my remark about you not having done a rear tyre change on the MP3. Was not intended as an insult. Just a bit of Australian dry humour. Pasiba!
Enthusiast
Piaggio MP3 250, BigBeo
Joined: 30 May 2015
Posts: 89
Location: Chelyabinsk, Russia
Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:57 am quote
Well, my experience with darkside (car) tire is strictly positive. The machine leans as it should (watch out for pressure though, it should be less than with m/c tire), wear is not noticeable for 6000+ and grip is perfect, especially compared to stock Michelin. Also it is softer, so dumps bumps. Well, also its price: somewhat about USD25 or so. Also I could buy winter spiked tire to rear, but front spiked tires are a problem, so I don't try to ride on ice.

PS Yep, I'm from Russia. We have very few those rides here, and mine is the only in Chelyabinsk (more than a million people). Also I own the only Scarabeo 500 GT in Chelyabinsk... And my Italian friend jokes at me that I am half Italian. Also because my surname, Mazyrko, looks Italian too.
Ossessionato
MP3 500, GTS 250 (both 2008 MY), 2010 Can Am Spyder RT-S, 2012 Honda NC700 DCT
Joined: 02 Mar 2013
Posts: 4763
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:22 am quote
Breitie wrote:
WoW! Sully. Is that your name? Can I call you that?
Anyway, your'e messin' with my mind there! Forty thou on a scooter tyre seemed a bit out of this world. Thanks for clarifying that it is actually eight thou per tyre. Still very good mileage. Perhaps you are a careful rider?
I had a look at the Michelin City Grips. Also very common here it seems. I like the solid ridge in the middle for better wear on straight runs.
My new rear tyre is a 130/70/12 Pirelli SL26 and was recommended by the Piaggio dealer, actually was the only one they had. I thought Pirelli and Piaggio are made for each other and should be ok.
I must mention that in the three days that I have been on this Forum I have already learned a lot. Thanks guys. Breite
Hey Breitie, yeah you can call me Sully.
I don't picture myself as a careful rider, at least as far as rear tire wear.
I ride mostly highway, 55+ MPH and when commuting 70+ MPH.
Also mostly more or less straight line, so relatively little hard cornering.
On the other hand, I do a fair bit of 2-up riding with my wife.
Or at least, we did a fair bit of 2-up riding on the MP3; we have since moved on to a Can Am Spyder for most all of our together riding....
Member
Piaggio MP3 250 e
Joined: 04 Dec 2018
Posts: 22
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:36 pm quote
Hello Mr. Mazyrko, nice to hear from you again, also your good advice about the use of car tyres. Seems it makes a lot of sense perhaps. I will look for you in your city of Chelyabinsk on Google. Must be getting freeezing there now? Here the summer has started with temperatures of up to 48C and lots of fires everywhere. We need the tropical rains to wet everything down a bit. Poka!
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