Extreme tight u-turn on mp3?
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Hooked
Piaggio MP3 500 2016
Joined: 20 Jun 2017
Posts: 104
Location: Chicago
Thu May 02, 2019 3:01 pm quote
OK, who has experience with doing extreme tight u-turn on piaggio mp3 WITHOUT putting your feet down? What's your radius? How do you do it?
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The Hornet (GT200, aka Love Bug) and 'Dimples' - a GTS 300
Joined: 26 Aug 2007
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Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Thu May 02, 2019 3:08 pm quote
With practice, you can do slow tight circles with the centre-stand scraping on the ground continuously. The radius of that is well under two car-park space widths - I've seen it done.

The rule about U-turns is that if you can walk a bike in that radius, you should be able to ride it. That's why the old UK m/c test included riding a U-turn - having first demonstrated you could do that U-turn by walking the bike round.
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Neutrino MP3 492.7 AK, 2013 Moto Guzzi Norge
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Location: Harriman, Tennessee, Tn
Thu May 02, 2019 3:41 pm quote
I can do lock to lock turns. its all about counter weight and practice practice practice.
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MP3 500, GTS 250 (both 2008 MY), 2010 Can Am Spyder RT-S, 2012 Honda NC700 DCT
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Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Thu May 02, 2019 4:14 pm quote
I can do tight uturns with my wife pillion. She gets nervous if it’s on gravel.
Ossessionato
2019 MP3 SPORT 500 IE
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Location: El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora Reina de los Ángeles sobre el Río Porciúncula
Fri May 03, 2019 12:14 am quote
I'm not as good as these ^ guys, but I've done some u-turns.

I've also dropped it a couple of times when I wasn't getting it just right.

It can be tricky.

Yes, counterleaning and practice are the keys.
Ossessionato
1991 T5 Pole Position, 2008 LXS 125, 2013 Peugeot Metropolis RS
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Location: Staffordshire UK
Fri May 03, 2019 12:34 am quote
jimc wrote:
With practice, you can do slow tight circles with the centre-stand scraping on the ground continuously. The radius of that is well under two car-park space widths - I've seen it done.

The rule about U-turns is that if you can walk a bike in that radius, you should be able to ride it. That's why the old UK m/c test included riding a U-turn - having first demonstrated you could do that U-turn by walking the bike round.
Wow! never seen this done with scraping stand! I'm sure gravity would outdo momentum if i tried it

was it one of these guys

Hooked
2016 mp3 500 sport
Joined: 30 Mar 2012
Posts: 216
Location: San Diego California
Fri May 03, 2019 11:14 am quote
Nowadays of the fly-by-wire throttle control, low speed maneuvering is not as easy as before. I find that starting the turn with the bars all the way over and using the throttle and rear brake alternately works best for me.

Learning how to do U-turns both left and right takes some practice.

Last edited by jfolander on Mon May 06, 2019 11:59 am; edited 1 time in total
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MP3 500, GTS 250 (both 2008 MY), 2010 Can Am Spyder RT-S, 2012 Honda NC700 DCT
Joined: 02 Mar 2013
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Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Fri May 03, 2019 11:52 am quote
jfolander wrote:
Nowadays of the fly-by-wire throttle control, low speed maneuvering is not as easy as before. I find that starting the turn with the bars all the way over and using the throttle and rear brake alternately works best for me.

Others have said that RH turns are more difficult, no one seems to know why.
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Modded Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 5263
Location: Downtown Toronto
Fri May 03, 2019 12:09 pm quote
I'm curious but just have to ask you MP3 guys that ride other motorcycles as well.

Wouldn't it be easier on an MP3 than a traditional 2 wheeler? Seems like it would be. I may be way off on this though. Keep meaning to take one for a spin.

I can u-turn on a C650T which is a heavier and larger bike and hope the advice I offer helps... In the case of a 2-wheeler I find not just looking through the turn but staring the turn down like it's 2 wrestlers getting ready to face each other (hockey face-off.. whatever works) helps as it provides focus. As mentioned most key is riding the rear brake and using the throttle for control. DO NOT just try to go slow on the throttle and brake if you feel it goes to fast. Use the brake to control your speed. Honestly I really learnt how to do this properly under professional instruction and it helped so much. having someone yell at you if your eyes wander works wonders

Practice balancing your bike at very slow speeds as well. You'd be surprised but it doesn't take that long that you can pretty much stay bolt upright at a near stop without putting your feet down. A well made bike is a well balanced bike.
Hooked
2019 MP3 500hpe Sport
Joined: 03 Nov 2014
Posts: 435
Location: Germany
Sat May 04, 2019 8:36 am quote
jfolander wrote:
Nowadays of the fly-by-wire throttle control, low speed maneuvering is not as easy as before. I find that starting the turn with the bars all the way over and using the throttle and rear brake alternately works best for me.

Others have said that RH turns are more difficult, no one seems to know why.
I am much more dominant with going left and I think the reason this is so, and I think for most people, is because you are on the left side of your car. You look in your left mirror, you look over your left shoulder, and hence left is easier for most. I feel better when going through corners going left versus right, but looking at the tires, I use them evenly on both sides even if it doesn't feel like it. I am not great when it comes to tight u-turns, but I am ok.
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Neutrino MP3 492.7 AK, 2013 Moto Guzzi Norge
Joined: 29 Mar 2008
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Location: Harriman, Tennessee, Tn
Sat May 04, 2019 2:40 pm quote
my thoughts on why folks have a tough time doing right hand tight lock to lock turns.

your handle bars are turned tight to the right which is your throttle hand and this makes controlling the throttle a bit more effort as your whole right arm is tight into your body and its tough to manipulate the throttle.

the biggest thing I can tell or show folks is super tight turns requires you to put your chin as close to your inside should as you can, don't bring your shoulder forward but turn your head into your shoulder hard. Then turn your eyes even tighter into the corner as well.

start out in bigger circles and as you gain experience and confidence keep getting tighter and tighter until you reach the mechanical stops of the handle bars.
Hooked
2019 MP3 500hpe Sport
Joined: 03 Nov 2014
Posts: 435
Location: Germany
Sun May 05, 2019 3:46 am quote
I was going to say the same thing to about the throttle and right. Had a bit too much drank drank last night when I posted my comment.
Hooked
Looking
Joined: 18 Feb 2019
Posts: 173
Location: Tampa
Sun May 05, 2019 5:14 am quote
jfolander wrote:
Others have said that RH turns are more difficult, no one seems to know why.
I agree, I always found right turns harder on motorcycles.
Here in the US we ride in the right lane, so left turns have another lane as a buffer.
Right turns appear harder because there's no extra room. (at least in our mind).
The proof of this would be if a guy from the UK opined that left turns are harder.
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The Hornet (GT200, aka Love Bug) and 'Dimples' - a GTS 300
Joined: 26 Aug 2007
Posts: 37401
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Sun May 05, 2019 7:26 am quote
Allens wrote:
jfolander wrote:
Others have said that RH turns are more difficult, no one seems to know why.
I agree, I always found right turns harder on motorcycles.
Here in the US we ride in the right lane, so left turns have another lane as a buffer.
Right turns appear harder because there's no extra room. (at least in our mind).
The proof of this would be if a guy from the UK opined that left turns are harder.
Having loads of experience of both - I'd say they are both as hard (or easy!) as each other.

However, doing U-turns to the left is rare in the UK, and doing U-turns to the right is rare in the US - so that might explain why one might feel less familiar or harder than the other.
Hooked
2008 fuoco.T3 guzzi california outfit
Joined: 19 Jul 2015
Posts: 187
Location: United Kingdom.
Mon May 06, 2019 1:22 am quote
As mentioned before it's more difficult to do the right hand turn because of the right hand throttle now if you were riding a wla harley with left hand throttle right hand turns probably would be easy. Anyone here got one?
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Modded Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
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Location: Downtown Toronto
Mon May 06, 2019 2:28 am quote
jimc wrote:
Allens wrote:
jfolander wrote:
Others have said that RH turns are more difficult, no one seems to know why.
I agree, I always found right turns harder on motorcycles.
Here in the US we ride in the right lane, so left turns have another lane as a buffer.
Right turns appear harder because there's no extra room. (at least in our mind).
The proof of this would be if a guy from the UK opined that left turns are harder.
Having loads of experience of both - I'd say they are both as hard (or easy!) as each other.

However, doing U-turns to the left is rare in the UK, and doing U-turns to the right is rare in the US - so that might explain why one might feel less familiar or harder than the other.
Fully agree. I used to have a problem with right hand turn but after a bit of practice and getting over the mental block they are just as easy as left. I can imagine it being opposite for many riders in the UK.
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