Your Experience(s) of 'Service Intervals' for Vespa Parts
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Member
Vespa GT125
Joined: 24 Apr 2019
Posts: 16
Location: London E10
Sat May 04, 2019 6:34 am quote
Hi. I want to get some feedback from members about how long certain parts typically 'last' on a Vespa. Prefer information specifically on 'modern' 125 models year 2000 onwards (but feel free to post on larger engined models).

So what am I talking about? Well all the parts that need typically need routine replacement (sooner or later):

A): Brake Pads, Clutch, Drive Belt, Wheel Bearings.

B): Also Engine Bearings, Small End, Big End & Piston Rings (I guess really I'm asking how long does an engine last before needing a complete strip down and refurb)?

I can hear you say - how long is a piece of string? Yes I fully understand there are a lot of variables here: rider weight, riding style, motorway driving versus local trips, etc, etc... I appreciate this!

However (and especially if you have owned a vespa from new) - can you indicate when did you have to replace these parts. Can you respond in mileages (rather than years).

Example: Vespa GT125 (YEAR 2008)

- Front Brake Pad replacement at 10k miles,
- Clutch replacement at 20k miles,
- Rear Wheel Bearing replacement at 40k miles etc..

With enough responses this could be really interesting. Unless this topic has been covered in detail before?

I look forward to your replies.

Paul
Moderaptor
The Hornet (GT200, aka Love Bug) and 'Dimples' - a GTS 300
Joined: 26 Aug 2007
Posts: 36949
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Sat May 04, 2019 7:00 am quote
Brake pad wear is totally down to the individual rider's road topography and riding style. Brake pads (front or rear ) can last between 4,000 miles and 50,000 miles. So no answer there then.

The same applies to an extent with the belt - but as a belt failure can be so catastrophic it's wise to replace at the Piaggio recommended service intervals.

Clutch? Can last the life of the bike. Likewise wheel bearings. Or not, depending on many factors...

Engines can last the life of the bike as well with proper routine maintenance.

The often forgotten items are brake fluid and coolant changes - wise to do those at the recommended intervals as well.

Sorry if those answers aren't quite what you're looking for, but the above seems to reflect the experiences of MV members.
Member
Vespa GT125
Joined: 24 Apr 2019
Posts: 16
Location: London E10
Sat May 04, 2019 8:13 am quote
Thanks for response.

I have read in my Haynes manual to check drivebelt every 3750 miles or 12 months and replacement after 7500 miles or every 2 years. Any tips / indicators on what to look for (in terms of wear) that would indicate it's time to change the belt?

Regarding the lifetime of a scooter / engine - what kind of mileage have people racked up before a scooter is 'technically' worn out? Did l read somewhere that if looked after (eg not thrashed on a daily basis!) & regularly serviced then 100k miles is possible?
Ossessionato
2009 GTV250, 2003 Inder trailer, 2001 BMW R1100RT
Joined: 24 Jun 2009
Posts: 3582
Location: Santa Cruz California
Sat May 04, 2019 11:34 am quote
There's an age-old saying that I have proven time and time again: THere's never enough time to do it right, but there's always enough time to do it over. Now I try to do it right the first time, every time, and when applied to Vespa maintenance, it means maintaining it according to the Vespa recommendations, following their specs.

Best
Miguel

Last edited by Miguel on Sat May 04, 2019 7:48 pm; edited 1 time in total
Moderaptor
The Hornet (GT200, aka Love Bug) and 'Dimples' - a GTS 300
Joined: 26 Aug 2007
Posts: 36949
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Sat May 04, 2019 12:05 pm quote
Paul_l wrote:
Thanks for response.

I have read in my Haynes manual to check drivebelt every 3750 miles or 12 months and replacement after 7500 miles or every 2 years. Any tips / indicators on what to look for (in terms of wear) that would indicate it's time to change the belt?
Drive Belt Service Limit?
Quote:
Regarding the lifetime of a scooter / engine - what kind of mileage have people racked up before a scooter is 'technically' worn out? Did l read somewhere that if looked after (eg not thrashed on a daily basis!) & regularly serviced then 100k miles is possible?
Yes - and beyond! It's hard to thrash these engines, as they have a rev limiter that is quite conservative - but few people ever encounter it, these are high-revving engines in the first place.
Addicted
2007 Vespa 250 gts / 1961 Vespa VBA
Joined: 02 Sep 2010
Posts: 985
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Tue May 07, 2019 6:52 pm quote
I replace the belt/ rollers, oil, gear oil on schedule.
JUST changed brake pads at 38,400 miles.
New clutch in the low 20k miles.
Bearings? Oil looks good each time I do a change....
Molto Verboso
2016 Vespa GTS300ie abs/asr/ess Settantesimo '70'
Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 1788
Location: Not really sure but I think somewhere in the engineering dept at Starfleet's UK HQ
Wed May 08, 2019 12:12 am quote
Paul_l wrote:
Thanks for response.

I have read in my Haynes manual to check drivebelt every 3750 miles or 12 months and replacement after 7500 miles or every 2 years. Any tips / indicators on what to look for (in terms of wear) that would indicate it's time to change the belt?

Regarding the lifetime of a scooter / engine - what kind of mileage have people racked up before a scooter is 'technically' worn out? Did l read somewhere that if looked after (eg not thrashed on a daily basis!) & regularly serviced then 100k miles is possible?
Hi Paul, all good questions you pose above in your first and this second post.

Yes, your engine could last 100,000 miles if you look after it properly. One of the biggest things you can do to protect your engine (you probably know this) is change the oil at the specified times. STRONGLY recommend using fully synthetic motorcycle oil, NOT car oil of any kind. There is a big difference between the two oil types even though they meet the same standard. Folks seem to think because our engines don't have wet clutches or gears using the engine oil, that car oil is ok. But meeting the same standard does not mean they are both suitable for the same use. The oils are designed to meet the different requirements of petrol bikes, and cars. Would seriously suggest steering clear of oils specifically meant for diesel engines which seriously degrade your engine over time due to poor oil film strength partially caused by too much detergent for a petrol engine (among other things). Diesel engine oils were mostly the only oils that caused 'hot' engine wear to our high revving bike engines with too much metal to metal contact occurring on key components. I can say this because I'm an ex master tech and engine design and development engineer. Testing oil types actually in engines was part of my job. I 'blueprinted' (stripping and measuring engine wear) each engine at the start and finish of testing with each oil type. The difference between the two types of oil regarding the amount of wear differential is quite stark over time. This can be as much as a 50% difference in engine wear when using car or diesel engine oil, compared to bike oil. Motorcycle oil wins hands down in every way preventing considerable extra engine wear on all the key components. Oils for diesel engines allowed the most engine wear to happen, and believe it or not, due to considerable misinformation and urban myth on the net and this site, some folks use diesel engine oil in their bikes without understanding the damage it can do. I'm not trying to belittle those folks, but they have been misled into using an unsuitable oil for a high revving bike engine. Diesel engine oils are just fine in a low revving diesel engines as diesel engines are not demanding on their oil. I'm not singling out any specific diesel engine oil here, there are many and we tested many. Motorcycle oil will get your bike to 100,000 for sure. Just don't run wide open throttle all the time and you'll get there. Sorry to go on about the oil but it's really important if you want your bike to go a big distance.

I've seen plenty of GT200's with over 80,000 miles on them and I once serviced the fuel injected version of your bike which had somewhere around mid 70,000 miles on the clock if I remember correctly and apparently had not had any major work done on it apart from consumables. This will have included a variator, maybe a clutch but I didn't ask about that one. JImC makes all the valid points about component replacement very nicely in his first post to you. Good luck and have fun on your bike.
Molto Verboso
GT200 & GTS250 & NC750X & Royal Enfield Pegasus
Joined: 23 Aug 2013
Posts: 1977
Location: London
Wed May 08, 2019 1:56 am quote
Both these scooters were used for city commuting and as main form of transport.

GT200 (bought new in 2003) approx 16k miles
* Brake Pads - still original and still have lots of wear left
* Clutch - still original but did once clean it
* Drive Belt - swapped at 12K miles
* Wheel Bearings - still original
* Engine Bearings - still original and don't expect to replace
* Small End - still original and don't expect to replace
* Big End - still original and don't expect to replace
* Piston Rings - still original and don't expect to replace

GTS 250 (bought new in 2008) approx 22k miles
* Brake Pads - still original and still have lots of wear left
* Clutch - still original
* Drive Belt - swapped at near 12K miles
* Wheel Bearings - still original and don't expect to replace
* Engine Bearings - still original and don't expect to replace
* Small End - still original and don't expect to replace
* Big End - still original and don't expect to replace
* Piston Rings - still original and don't expect to replace
Hooked
GTS 300ie Touring
Joined: 03 Jun 2018
Posts: 263
Location: Limassol, Cyprus
Thu May 09, 2019 10:29 pm quote
robinm wrote:
Both these scooters were used for city commuting and as main form of transport.

GT200 (bought new in 2003) approx 16k miles
* Brake Pads - still original and still have lots of wear left
* Clutch - still original but did once clean it
* Drive Belt - swapped at 12K miles
* Wheel Bearings - still original
* Engine Bearings - still original and don't expect to replace
* Small End - still original and don't expect to replace
* Big End - still original and don't expect to replace
* Piston Rings - still original and don't expect to replace

GTS 250 (bought new in 2008) approx 22k miles
* Brake Pads - still original and still have lots of wear left
* Clutch - still original
* Drive Belt - swapped at near 12K miles
* Wheel Bearings - still original and don't expect to replace
* Engine Bearings - still original and don't expect to replace
* Small End - still original and don't expect to replace
* Big End - still original and don't expect to replace
* Piston Rings - still original and don't expect to replace
Further proof of the overall durability of the GTS. As Stomrider remarks, if you respect the service intervals of your scooter, use the correct oils and coolant and don't 'thrash' it for long periods at WOT, I can't see why anyone cannot get a long service life out of their bike. I know whenever I go anywhere I am conscious to keep my speed down for the first few miles to enable the engine oil time to warm up and so reduce engine wear.
Member
Vespa GT125
Joined: 24 Apr 2019
Posts: 16
Location: London E10
Mon May 13, 2019 2:54 am quote
Thanks for all your responses. Interesting information!!
Veni, Vidi, Posti
GTS 300, BV 500, Buddy 125
Joined: 05 Apr 2008
Posts: 7704
Location: Houston, TX/Breckenridge, CO
Mon May 13, 2019 5:23 am quote
Hmm, our Sports City 250 with the same engine as my GTS 250 lasts 87,000 miles before being taken out by a flood.

During that time it was run on two cannonballs (definition of thrashing), a couple of other cross country trips and a daily rider for an 18-24 y.o.

Brake pads replaced at 55,000 miles, exhaust at 70,000, starter at 45,000. Brake light at 35,000 (cannonball related aka rough dirt roads). Other than that routine maintenance per Piaggio's published schedule. Variator replaced at 75,000 miles post second cannonball before riding back to Houston from Seattle.

Since the engine is the same Quasar as the GTS I figured I'd throw those number in the mix.
eeee-bip
Benelli TNT 125 "Bean Alley" Kymco AK550 The War to end all Wars
Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 15850
Location: South East Great England of Britishland
Mon May 13, 2019 5:56 am quote
Chin
To be fair unless it's a really small displacement bike an engine doesn't get thrashed on Cannonball.

It will spend a fair amount of time in the upper rev range but it doesn't get thrashed.

In fact it's probably having an easier time on the long stretches when it's not loaded under acceleration.

Bill x
Molto Verboso
2016 Vespa GTS300ie abs/asr/ess Settantesimo '70'
Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 1788
Location: Not really sure but I think somewhere in the engineering dept at Starfleet's UK HQ
Mon May 13, 2019 7:27 am quote
Totally agree Bill. Probably far less stressed on a run like that.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
GTS 300, BV 500, Buddy 125
Joined: 05 Apr 2008
Posts: 7704
Location: Houston, TX/Breckenridge, CO
Mon May 13, 2019 9:04 am quote
There weren't the dirt sections on the 2012 cannonball there were in 2014 and 2018.
eeee-bip
Benelli TNT 125 "Bean Alley" Kymco AK550 The War to end all Wars
Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 15850
Location: South East Great England of Britishland
Mon May 13, 2019 9:17 am quote
Plus
I don't doubt it but it's still not technically a thrash.

A thrash is when you pin the throttle to the stop and you keep there for as long as possible.

No doubt the going would be arduous but you're not going to thrash the engine of the dirt sections as you're using the torque of the engine to get over the lose stuff, not revving it.

Even when I'm doing the long rides I'm not trashing it so I doubt the Cannonballers would.

Bill x

Last edited by Bill Dog on Mon May 13, 2019 9:20 am; edited 1 time in total
Veni, Vidi, Posti
MP3 500, GTS 250 (both 2008 MY), 2010 Can Am Spyder RT-S, 2012 Honda NC700 DCT
Joined: 02 Mar 2013
Posts: 5031
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Mon May 13, 2019 9:18 am quote
Re: Plus
Bill Dog wrote:
I don't doubt it but it's still not technically a thrash.

A thrash is when you pin the throttle to the stop and you keep there for as long as possible.

Have you ever ridden with Motovista?
eeee-bip
Benelli TNT 125 "Bean Alley" Kymco AK550 The War to end all Wars
Joined: 15 Apr 2008
Posts: 15850
Location: South East Great England of Britishland
Mon May 13, 2019 9:26 am quote
Bonus
No but I've ridden with Fenner and he does not piss about.

He's easily a far better rider than me.

He sets the standard.

Bill x
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