Metric wrenches
Post Reply    Forum -> General Discussion
Author Message
Hooked
GTS 300
Joined: 19 Nov 2018
Posts: 103
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Mon May 06, 2019 5:33 pm quote
I would like to buy a set of metric wrenches and would like suggestions on the range of sizes. They would be open end and ratchet end on the other side.
Thanks
Addicted
2016 LXV 150 ie, 1978 Vespa P125, 2019 Piaggio Liberty 150
Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 507
Location: central Illinois USA
Mon May 06, 2019 6:15 pm quote
17, 14, 13 (but you might rarely need that 1) 12mm and 11, get 10 mm and maybe 2 of those. An 9, 8, and 7 is handy if your scooter has any really tiny nuts hiding, like the ones in the glove box holding on the front turn signals on my Ď78P125x. 17mm is that pesky nut on my mirrors. Hit Harbor Freight and get some of those cute little folding hex and star tools, metric hex, please, and yes there are standard and metric, Vespa likes those pesky things.

CDA668C1-2F11-4AA2-B122-95816F99E728.jpeg

Ossessionato
LXV 150 Midnight Blue (Sold)
Joined: 06 Dec 2010
Posts: 2693
Location: Bangkok
Tue May 07, 2019 3:50 am quote
You won't go far wrong with these?

http://metrinch.tv/14-Piece-Wrench-Set_p_1485.html

Not ratchet but....
Ossessionato
BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2656
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Tue May 07, 2019 4:19 am quote
The ratchet end wrenches are nice to have sometimes, but they're not substitutes for sockets in a lot of situations. If I were buying a first set of metric wrenches I would start with a set of combination wrenches (not ratcheting) and a set of 3/8" drive sockets with a ratchet handle. There may be some extra tools like spark plug sockets, larger sockets (17mm, 19mm, 24mm), extensions, and flex adapters which you can add later as you need them.

Harbor Freight wrenches and sockets are good enough for the average do-it-yourselfer. Look for some of their 20% off coupons. Happy wrenching!
Hooked
GTS 300
Joined: 19 Nov 2018
Posts: 103
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Tue May 07, 2019 6:48 am quote
I appreciate the advice from all.

FYI, there are ratchet combo wrenches with a flex feature. Don't know how much leverage you get to turn a nut at 90 degree bend.
Ossessionato
BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2656
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Tue May 07, 2019 7:00 am quote
RP Tech wrote:
I appreciate the advice from all.

FYI, there are ratchet combo wrenches with a flex feature. Don't know how much leverage you get to turn a nut at 90 degree bend.
Not as much as you would with a socket and ratchet hande.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2007 LX 150 (memories)
Joined: 12 Jun 2007
Posts: 8150
Location: New Hampshire
Tue May 07, 2019 8:01 am quote
Get 6 point instead of 12 point sockets or box wrenches if possible. That will prevent most rounding off of the hex corners.
Hooked
GTS 300
Joined: 19 Nov 2018
Posts: 103
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Tue May 07, 2019 8:34 am quote
Thanks, I got the point.
Hooked
BV 350
Joined: 22 Nov 2016
Posts: 307
Location: Nebraska
Tue May 07, 2019 9:05 am quote
Hmm
If you are a young fella, think about buying quality tools.

I started buying tools when I was 15 ('cause my dad never had anything but worn out and crappy tools). Bought Craftsmen and Stanley (good names at the time). Still serving me well 50 years later.

Harbor Freight is fine for tools you don't use much. I have sets of their t-handle allen wrenches, and they never quite seem to fit the fasteners exactly. And I buy their power tools, which are so cheap that they are disposable. But if it is something I am going to use a lot, or put some force on, I go elsewhere. Same goes for woodworking tools where I need some precision.

Might think about buying good wrenchs (not necessarily Snap-on or Matco) in the sizes that you need now, then adding to the collection as the need arises. A good socket set will have fine splines on the ratchet handle (so you can work it over a narrow arc in tight places) and the sockets will be good stuff and exact fits, reducing the chances of rounding fasteners.

Probably need only a few sizes of the ratchet/flex head box end wrenches. I only have a couple for specific tasks on specific machines. Otherwise standard combination wrenches and sockets get the job done. Kinda wonder how well the ratchet box wrenches will stand up over time when they start accumulating crud in the mechanism.

Not that you need them for our pets here, but is you have any 'metric' bikes, worth thinking about a set of 'JIS' screwdrivers. Not really called that anymore, but specifically designed not to cam out of the 'phillips' fasteners on metric bikes.
Hooked
2013 GTS300ie
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 374
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Tue May 07, 2019 9:34 am quote
My first set of spanners I bought when I got my VW Beetle. They were not combination spanners.
Double sided flats and double sided offset ring spanners with a full set of sockets, ratchet power bar short and long extension and even a swivel joint.
40 years later, I still have that set... minus one large 20/22 flat that went walkabout.

I can't see the logic of combination spanners. If I have a bolt with a 10mm head, it uses a 10mm nut I need two combination spanners.

I know there was a convention proposed where all bolts would have even numbered sizes and all nuts have uneven numbered sizes - e.g. 10mm bolt with 11mm nut.
It seems this has not been implemented - hence the need for two combination spanners.

BTW, JIS screwdrivers are a Japanese Industry Standard.
They are similar to Phillips and have improved interface with the bolt heads so they are better than Phillips. You can use JIS in Phillips heads, but not the other way around.

Japanese motorcycles were designed from the start to use JIS headed machine screws, but most amateurs and many pro mechanics just used Phillips screwdrivers, which is why the JIS heads stripped out.

JIS.png

Ossessionato
LXV 150 Midnight Blue (Sold)
Joined: 06 Dec 2010
Posts: 2693
Location: Bangkok
Tue May 07, 2019 11:06 am quote
Fudmucker wrote:
It seems this has not been implemented - hence the need for two combination spanners.

Buy a set of folding Allen keys. You need another set to tighten the "nut and bolt" holding them all together.
Moderaptor
The Hornet (GT200, aka Love Bug) and 'Dimples' - a GTS 300
Joined: 26 Aug 2007
Posts: 37259
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Tue May 07, 2019 11:35 am quote
The sets of Harbor Freight impact sockets (both regular and deep) are well worth it - plus their 9-piece set of wobble extensions.

Their torque wrenches are good enough for occasional use at home. Some of their ratchets are OK, some are not so good. The ones with a button on the back to eject a socket and a lever-flick to change direction seem OK - they're what I use.
Ossessionato
Joined: 22 Oct 2011
Posts: 3842
Location: Tega Cay, SC
Tue May 07, 2019 4:09 pm quote
I bought a large set of Sears Craftman tools when I was 16 years old. Except for a few sockets that I shattered (and were replaced for free), they have preformed perfectly for almost 50 years. Alas, I can not recommend them anymore. I had a 3/8 ratchet that on its last legs and I traded in for a replacement at Lowes, Unfortunately, it is a piece of junk. I can mount a socket on it and pull it off with my fingers without too much effort - this without pushing the release button. All around, they are not nearly as good as they used to be. Kobalt are better. Lastly, I would advise you to but the best tools you can afford, it is well worth it.
Ossessionato
1976 Super (x 2), 1974 Primavera (x 2), 2006 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 4684
Location: So Cal
Tue May 07, 2019 4:59 pm quote
Tierney speaketh wisely. Youíll only regret buying cheap tools. Good tools make the job easier and will last you a lifetime. And avoid Craftsman. Itís not the quality it once was.
Hooked
GTS 300
Joined: 19 Nov 2018
Posts: 103
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Wed May 08, 2019 5:49 am quote
I remember going to Sears with my dad to replace a screw driver he used as a chisel and damaged it. I was utterly surprised that it was replaced on the spot-no questions. Apparently now that Stanley, Black&Decker owns the Craftsman brand they are beginning to make the line more profitable and cutting corners.
His old tools work fine, I just like the newer ratchet/flex head box end wrenches and had a chance to buy them. Based on prior posts, I'll stick with my fathers tools. He always bought quality and is probably why they're still working.
Thanks everyone; I have enough tool info now.
Ralph
Missouri Loves Company Rally   vespa scooterwest scooter west Motorsport Scooters   Scooter Parts Company
Post Reply    Forum -> General Discussion
[ Time: 0.2143s ][ Queries: 27 (0.0599s) ][ Debug on ]