Front suspension / 60,000 miles
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Member
Vespa 2013 GTS 300
Joined: 13 Mar 2019
Posts: 15
Location: West Valley City Utah
Tue May 14, 2019 2:38 am quote
Any recommendations on aftermarket front suspension for the GTS 300 ? Mine almost 60,000 miles.

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Addicted
2010 Vespa 300 Super
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 619
Location: NYC
Tue May 14, 2019 3:38 am quote
The general consensus is to replace the OEM shocks with Malossi RS24 shocks for both front and rear. Some use Bitubo as well.
I have been angling for the Malossi's myself though YSS a brand not well known here in the U.S. makes some good shocks as well.
Also it has been stated by many of the wise MV folks to replace the standard bushings with polyurethane bushings made by Clauss Studios.
I believe all the brands are carried by Scooterwest and Scooterpartsco
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2008 MP3 500, 2013 BV350
Joined: 13 Oct 2012
Posts: 6586
Location: Ashburn, Va. Home to the Internet
Tue May 14, 2019 3:58 am quote
baba12 wrote:
The general consensus is to replace the OEM shocks with Malossi RS24 shocks for both front and rear. Some use Bitubo as well.
I have been angling for the Malossi's myself though YSS a brand not well known here in the U.S. makes some good shocks as well.
Also it has been stated by many of the wise MV folks to replace the standard bushings with polyurethane bushings made by Clauss Studios.
I believe all the brands are carried by Scooterwest and Scooterpartsco
Only replace rubber with poly if you want a harsher ride. The rubber will give a better ride.
Addicted
2010 Vespa 300 Super
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 619
Location: NYC
Tue May 14, 2019 4:07 am quote
Quote:
Only replace rubber with poly if you want a harsher ride. The rubber will give a better ride.
So I guess those who have these bushings prefer a stiffer ride or does it handle better. I would want anything that would make the ride softer, smoother given the crappy roads we have.
Ossessionato
2018 Yamaha Xmax (Max), 2006 Vespa GT (Rocket): 2005 Vespa GT (Razzo): 2007 Vespa GT (Vanessa): 1965 Lambretta Li 125
Joined: 26 Sep 2006
Posts: 4018
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Tue May 14, 2019 5:06 am quote
You made it 60,000 miles with the OEM shocks.

Why not replace with the same?

Bill
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2008 MP3 500, 2013 BV350
Joined: 13 Oct 2012
Posts: 6586
Location: Ashburn, Va. Home to the Internet
Tue May 14, 2019 5:09 am quote
WLeuthold wrote:
You made it 60,000 miles with the OEM shocks.

Why not replace with the same?

Bill
I just replaced my OEM shocks with Bitubo, there is no comparision in ride quality between the two.
Hooked
Vespa P200E
Joined: 08 Aug 2007
Posts: 411
Location: Portland, Oregon
Tue May 14, 2019 8:23 am quote
WEB-Tech wrote:
baba12 wrote:
The general consensus is to replace the OEM shocks with Malossi RS24 shocks for both front and rear. Some use Bitubo as well.
I have been angling for the Malossi's myself though YSS a brand not well known here in the U.S. makes some good shocks as well.
Also it has been stated by many of the wise MV folks to replace the standard bushings with polyurethane bushings made by Clauss Studios.
I believe all the brands are carried by Scooterwest and Scooterpartsco
Only replace rubber with poly if you want a harsher ride. The rubber will give a better ride.
I just replaced my shocks with RS24s all around, but haven't had a chance to give them a whirl yet (just got them on last night).

I also replaced the rear bushings with the Clauss mounts, but I don't feel 100% sure that I'll like them, so I kept the old bushings (not too terribly worn) around, in case I change my mind.
The difference in squishiness, or the lack thereof, is huge. Some people suggest, however, that a higher quality shock will be better at handling road imperfections to a degree that squishy bushings are unnecessary. We'll see.

I'm also concerned that engine vibration will come through too strongly through the Clauss bushings, especially at idle.
The bushings are $24 shipped, so it's not an expensive experiment, just a bit of a hassle to switch back to the regular if you change your mind.

Note that these are REAR bushings, so not really applicable to your question about the front suspension. But at 60,000 miles I'd certainly swap out the rears as well! And if you do, get new bushings too, even if it's just the standard squishy ones.
Addicted
2010 Vespa 300 Super
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 619
Location: NYC
Tue May 14, 2019 10:16 am quote
Quote:
I just replaced my shocks with RS24s all around, but haven't had a chance to give them a whirl yet (just got them on last night).
I also replaced the rear bushings with the Clauss mounts, but I don't feel 100% sure that I'll like them, so I kept the old bushings (not too terribly worn) around, in case I change my mind.
Thats cool, and I am guessing you bought the Malossi based on your research & what others on the forum have stated about them.
Have you adjusted the SAG on the front shock, supposedly that is something you need 2 people to adjust and setup.
It will be nice to get a ride report in say a 2 weeks or so and possibly your take on how easy/difficult/pain in the butt task it was in replacing the shocks.

I know many have done the replacement to one of many shocks and each has pros/cons etc. I am still on the OEM shocks and they are ok but people who ride pillion complain about the ride not being smooth.
Hooked
2010 GTS 300
Joined: 15 Jan 2019
Posts: 175
Location: Texas
Tue May 14, 2019 1:18 pm quote
Carbone Sport Front Shock
I swapped to a Carbone Sport Front Shock from SPC. 129.xx

It's got a 3 way preload adjustment, and fit right up. Red spring. Seems like good quality. The ride was stiffer than I wanted, though, so I put the OEM back on (my GTS only has 4800 miles) for the cushier ride.

It only has about 100 miles on it. I've got the adjustment tool and paperwork. I'll sell it to you for $60.

PM me if you're interested..
Member
Vespa 2013 GTS 300
Joined: 13 Mar 2019
Posts: 15
Location: West Valley City Utah
Tue May 14, 2019 2:14 pm quote
Thanks for the responses. I did have my rear shocks replaced a year or so ago with Malossi RS24's. Does ride alot better. Just wish Vespa wouldn't choose the cheaper suppliers ( example is the wheels made in China ). I know everyone has their opinions on suppliers to but I have never known a product from China to have any form of quality to it. Not saying they have to make the Vespa with everything being from Zelioni but like someone else here was saying they think the quality level is not as good as before. Other than the shocks and different things that have to be replaced sometimes my Vespa / Malossi V4 kit with 110 octane only couple times a month is running strong.
Hooked
Vespa P200E
Joined: 08 Aug 2007
Posts: 411
Location: Portland, Oregon
Wed May 15, 2019 7:58 am quote
baba12 wrote:
Thats cool, and I am guessing you bought the Malossi based on your research & what others on the forum have stated about them.
Have you adjusted the SAG on the front shock, supposedly that is something you need 2 people to adjust and setup.
It will be nice to get a ride report in say a 2 weeks or so and possibly your take on how easy/difficult/pain in the butt task it was in replacing the shocks.

I know many have done the replacement to one of many shocks and each has pros/cons etc. I am still on the OEM shocks and they are ok but people who ride pillion complain about the ride not being smooth.
Circumstances (work/weather) means that it'll probably be at least two weeks before I get enough miles on them to make a good assessment.

I did, however, get a little city riding in after I had replaced the front shock (the easier one to do), before I took it back in to replace the other two. A (not so) quick gut reaction:

The small wheels, short suspension throw, and short wheel base means that we'll never be able to fully get rid of the jolts over big bumps and potholes. But, importantly, these jolts now just seem to affect your comfort, not the stability of the scooter.

Over small and medium size road imperfections the new front shock helps a lot. What you feel riding over these bumps used to be an irritation, now it's information, if that makes sense. While the old shocks appears to be squishier, they just were too slow to respond to all the small stuff, so the ride was pretty shaky and bumpy.

On the RS24, with the rebound damping set high, you will feel a harder ride (and crisper handling), but even then, the shock still responds better over all those little imperfections, so it's still somehow more comfortable. Harder, but not harsher.

With the rebound damping set low, well, it runs more smoothly over the bigger stuff, at the expense of some responsiveness and some brake dive. I'll probably run the damping fairly low most of the time, but it's fun that you can adjust this on a whim without tools.

Sidebar: There are too many "clicks" on most of these adjustable damping shocks! Five settings, instead of 10 or 20, would be a little less overwhelming for newbies to experiment with.
The preload for the front is step-less, which also adds to difficulty keeping track of your setting. The preload for the rears is 5-step, and I'm starting off at the second-softest preload. No rebounding damping adjustment on the rears.

I have not yet done the proper process to set the pre-load for the sag, I just guessed at a fairly low preload setting (single rider, 175lb). I did however do the trick where you strap a small zip-tie around the shock, and see how far it gets pushed up when riding. It "remembers" the spot of largest excursion. Checking it after some city riding without any major jolts, it got pushed all the way up, indicating that the shock had full excursion. So I'll need a bit more pre-load to keep the shock working in it's happy zone. But now the zip-tie is up there, and I can't seem to reach it to take it out!
I think you probably could use the zip-tie trick to measure the sag, if you don't have anybody around to help measuring.

Replacing the shocks is a medium difficulty job. You'll have to be a decent mechanic, with the right sockets and a torque wrench. Wheels have to come off. For the front you need a way to lift and hold the front in the air. For the rear you have to remove the exhaust, right side suspension/exhaust/wheel bracket, and unbolt the airbox.
I enjoy doing this kind of thing, and it gave me a good opportunity to give it a good clean, replace the brake pads, and gave me good access for doing engine and hub oil changes.
Hooked
Vespa P200E
Joined: 08 Aug 2007
Posts: 411
Location: Portland, Oregon
Wed May 15, 2019 3:06 pm quote
Let me correct myself: You do NOT need to remove the rear wheel, or that chunky bracket that holds the exhaust.
I got mixed up - I removed those so I could get to the brake pads.

I got a chance to take a quick loop with the rear suspension and the Clauss mounts. I'm not as fond of those. I think I blame the Clauss mounts. I could tell as soon as I started the engine that vibration was transmitted more to my butt. And that was true of road imperfections as well. That made it difficult to tell how well the new rear shocks worked.

I'll ride it some more like this, but I suspect that I'll switch back to the OEM rubber mounts pretty soon. Either the pair that was on there in the first place (they don't look very bad), or maybe a new set.

If somebody is on a budget, I'd say that it's perfectly reasonable to just switch out the front shock, and still get most of the benefits.
Of course, at 60,000 miles it's worth getting a new set, even if it's just a fresh pair of stock ones.
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