Difficulties Learning To Ride
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Member
Vespa Primavera 125
Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Posts: 7
Location: Edinburgh
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:05 pm quote
Evening all, hope youíre all well. Just joined the forum so thought Iíd say hello.

Having always wanted a Vespa I managed to get sign off from the wife and bought myself a beautiful Vespa LX125, I love it.

My difficulty, and hopefully you wonít laugh at me too much is in actually being able to drive it. what I mean by that is Iíve only been driving (a car) a year, but comfortable on the road. However I assumed riding a scooter would be easy, however it feels almost too powerful for me. I tried to take it out one morning and struggled to actually get started as it feels like as soon as I touch the throttle the initial power is far too much for me to cope and almost crashed it on my first attempt. Itís probably mainly psychological now as the thought of trying it again feels like the first time you ever drove by yourself.

So my question is, what does it sound like Iím doing wrong and did anyone else have any similar problems? Itís almost as if I need to have the breaks on full time just to be able to go slower than say 20mph. I think my best course of action is to call my local garage that does CBT courses and arrange that/individual training, however embarrassing that feels. Iíve had the garage service my bike as wondered if there was a problem with the throttle, but itís in great condition.

Cheers, and sorry for the war and peace first post.

Tam
Molto Verboso
Xmax 300
Joined: 02 Jul 2016
Posts: 1242
Location: Adelaide
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:20 pm quote
Re: Difficulties Learning To Ride
Tam Richardson wrote:
I think my best course of action is to call my local garage that does CBT courses and arrange that/individual training, however embarrassing that feels.

Tam
The training course is a great idea, better to be safe and embarrassed than having an accident. Find an empty parking lot or similar and practice to your hearts content. When you have gained the confidence to master the machine, and there are still issues with the throttle, it could be time for a mechanical check. P.S Welcome to M.V.
Ossessionato
BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2613
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:22 pm quote
Do take the course! And don't be embarrassed at all! You'll be a much better rider for taking it.

Start by just walking it around. No engine, just walking. Get used to the weight and maneuvering around. When you're ready to ride take your scooter out to a parking lot and practice braking and turning. Get so you can control the speed with the throttle and the brake.

By this time you'll be enrolled and starting the riding course. You'll learn to ride with confidence.

Good luck!
Ossessionato
Modded Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 4846
Location: Downtown Toronto
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:28 pm quote
This is on a 125? Regardless a motorbike and in some ways especially a scooter is going to feel jumpy if you've never ridden one. A good scooter even on the the lower CC range is going to accelerate faster than most non-sport cars and with the bigger scoots they will even beat those from a stop. The trick is to not blip the throttle but rather learn to go easy on it until you become accustomed.

Like Sledge said a training course is the way to go. I swear by them and even as an experienced rider I have taken the advanced courses. Riding a bike is very different than driving a car. Some things do cross over but in so many ways it is a different world.
Ossessionato
BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2613
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:29 pm quote
Throttle control -- for low speed maneuvers you'll have to use the throttle and brake (or the clutch if it's a shifty) at the same time. Takes practice but you'll master it.

The one best tip I learned when learning to ride is keep your head up and look where you want to go, not at the road.

Have fun!
Moderaptor
The Hornet (GT200, aka Love Bug) and 'Dimples' - a GTS 300
Joined: 26 Aug 2007
Posts: 37071
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:35 pm quote
Surely you have to do the CBT before taking it out on the road anyway - or is it different in Scotland than England/Wales? I doubt you'll need individual training - if you can ride a bicycle you can ride a scooter - just be gentle with the throttle until you're used to it.
Member
Vespa Primavera 125
Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Posts: 7
Location: Edinburgh
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:46 pm quote
jimc wrote:
Surely you have to do the CBT before taking it out on the road anyway - or is it different in Scotland than England/Wales? I doubt you'll need individual training - if you can ride a bicycle you can ride a scooter - just be gentle with the throttle until you're used to it.
Yeah, in Scotland my driving licence automatically covers scooters up to 125cc. Anything more powerful and Iíd need need a new license. Although, in theory at 16 when you can get a provisional licence you could do your 1 day CBT and be out on the road with L plates on, that seems madness to me but there you go.

Itís definitely the throttle Iím struggling with. It feels loose to me when the bike is off, and that I canít be any gentler with the throttle, but Iíve nothing to compare it to with this being my first bike. The garage that did the MOT said everything was fine. Once I can master the throttle and get the bloody thing moving Iíll be fine and pick things up
Member
Vespa Primavera 125
Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Posts: 7
Location: Edinburgh
Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:47 pm quote
Thanks for all the replies guys. Will keep you posted with how I get on and hopefully become a regular contributor to the site
Enthusiast
2012 LX150ie
Joined: 28 Jul 2018
Posts: 71
Location: Austin Texas USA
Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:14 pm quote
On a scooter, both of your hands have access to the Brakes
Take it easy, if you get in trouble just gently squeeze them.
Molto Verboso
Vespa Super 300
Joined: 24 Mar 2013
Posts: 1194
Location: IL
Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:15 pm quote
there is no question that taking at least one course and perhaps a couple will make you a better and safer rider. We all think that riding a scooter is like riding a bicycle but it is not. Do not feel bad most of us started with a good course, I took two and would like to take another if I could find one in my area, which i cannot. It is best to be safe take a course and learn and then practice. Just my opinion.

Larry
Addicted
2018 LIBERTY 150S
Joined: 26 Jul 2013
Posts: 642
Location: Ohio
Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:25 pm quote
Get yourself to a large empty lot and put several miles on it, starting, stopping, turning - for several days.. Get someone to follow you in a car to get you safely to the practice lot. If your practice lot is far away - forget this advice.

O.S.
Moderaptor
The Hornet (GT200, aka Love Bug) and 'Dimples' - a GTS 300
Joined: 26 Aug 2007
Posts: 37071
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Mon Jun 10, 2019 5:13 pm quote
Tam Richardson wrote:
jimc wrote:
Surely you have to do the CBT before taking it out on the road anyway - or is it different in Scotland than England/Wales? I doubt you'll need individual training - if you can ride a bicycle you can ride a scooter - just be gentle with the throttle until you're used to it.
Yeah, in Scotland my driving licence automatically covers scooters up to 125cc. Anything more powerful and Iíd need need a new license. Although, in theory at 16 when you can get a provisional licence you could do your 1 day CBT and be out on the road with L plates on, that seems madness to me but there you go.

Itís definitely the throttle Iím struggling with. It feels loose to me when the bike is off, and that I canít be any gentler with the throttle, but Iíve nothing to compare it to with this being my first bike. The garage that did the MOT said everything was fine. Once I can master the throttle and get the bloody thing moving Iíll be fine and pick things up
I've just checked - the motorcycle regulations cover all of Scotland, England and Wales. You can ride a 50cc on your grandfathered in car licence, but not a 125cc. You will need a CBT for that.
Car driving test passed before 1 February 2001
You can ride a moped (max 50cc) without L plates.
If you want to ride a motorcycle over 50cc and up to 125cc you will need to take CBT.
Once you have a valid CBT certificate you can ride a 125cc with L plates.
If you want to remove the L plates or ride a more powerful machine you will need to take the relevant practical tests.
It's a bugger. I got caught out by that way back in 2004, and decided to take my test (which was far easier and cheaper then) rather than re-take CBT every two years - plus I wanted to ride larger bikes. Back then once you'd passed your test on a 125 you could ride whatever you wanted after two more years.
Ossessionato
2019 MP3 SPORT 500 IE
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Mon Jun 10, 2019 5:19 pm quote
jimc wrote:
If you can ride a bicycle you can ride a scooter
Maybe. But they're still not the same thing.

Nothing to be embarrassed about taking a course. In fact, just the opposite. You are actually starting from a good place. Much better than false bravado - that can really get you in trouble.
Hooked
2016 LXV 150 ie, 1978 Vespa P125, 2019 Piaggio Liberty 150
Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 461
Location: central Illinois USA
Mon Jun 10, 2019 5:26 pm quote
I was in a nasty car accident over 9 years ago and had damage to my right lower leg and foot. And wear a lace up support boot that goes from toes to just below the right knee for work. That blasted foot and leg mess up my self confidence, especially with riding. I stress, I over think and I am afraid of failure.... but this past fall I won a vintage Vespa, shift on the left hand grip, back brake on that right side floor board. Itís now my summer work transportation, with that blasted brace!
My other scooters are automatic, twist and go, and didnít cause me much worry about IF I could ride them. So, yes, your worries and stress is adding to the difficulty. Take the class, it will help, find someone who also rides and has patience to help a beginner, we were all beginners once.
Post here, share photos of that scooter and your progress. If I can Eleanor to run that little shifty to work and beyond, you can master your scooter.
Member
2019 Primavera Sport
Joined: 15 Apr 2019
Posts: 19
Location: Los angeles
Mon Jun 10, 2019 8:00 pm quote
We all have our stories of accidents or troubles i would assume. I got into a pretty annoying accident was was really lucky i wasnt injured. Totalled my beautiful Nora though. Interestingly my problems werent controlling the vespa but how much i hate driving in LA. people around here drive like maniacs. The crash was down to mistakes i made but the other guy should have been looking.

Make sure you practice not target focusing and smooth acceleration. And never tailgate.
Molto Verboso
Triumph Street Scrambler 2018, Suzuki VanVan200 (sold), 2015 Sprint 125 (sold)
Joined: 12 Apr 2015
Posts: 1764
Location: Finland
Mon Jun 10, 2019 9:03 pm quote
A riding course as have been discussed, nothing embarrasing about that.

Many long term riders have been lucky enough to be able to start with a 50cc when young, it's the easiest way forward.

I tried to put together your description of the throttle behaviour and the mechanic saying it's OK...can only repeat comments said earlier:

-a correctly set clutch in a scooter allows you start moving with quite gentle, small twist of throttle. Within slow speeds, it may feel difficult to make the scoot move smoothly and in a controlled way, hence the second tip:

-in slow speeds, say walking speed and below, try using rear break together with the throttle.
Sounds stupid, but that's the way to make the scoot (or a motorcycle) move smoothly and in a more controlled way. Small, gently throttle movements combined with gentle help with the break... and suddenly you can master the speed
Addicted
Vespa PX 125 Settantesimo
Joined: 01 Feb 2017
Posts: 523
Location: Norf Wheezy
Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:09 pm quote
I would do the CBT before you get hit with a £1000 fine and 6 points!

Just do it on one of the loan bikes then you can compare that to your scooter.
Addicted
lx 50
Joined: 09 Oct 2017
Posts: 864
Location: Brighton
Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:13 pm quote
Scotland is part of Mainland Great Britain.

You Must Take Your CBT

Turn the Scooter off and put it away. I donít understand how you got insurance either as itís one of the main questions they ask either online or over the phone.

The CBT is a great course, and remember itís training not a test. So donít worry about it at all.

I bet once youíve done it you will feel a lot better behind the bars.

Good Luck
Molto Verboso
Gina, 1965 Vespa 180SS, Bella,1968 Vespa 150 Super, (Both NZ new Airco assembled), Francesca, 2006 Vespa LX150, Sofia, 2007 Vespa GT200
Joined: 21 Jan 2015
Posts: 1171
Location: Hamilton, NZ
Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:22 pm quote
My wife is still very new to riding and has an LX150. She initially had the same worry, the jerky throttle. So we put the scooter on the centre stand which raises the rear wheel off the ground. Then she practiced the throttle movements before trying to ride the scooter. The next move was a gentle run along our driveway, over and over. Now confident and has to get her licence.
Ossessionato
LXV 150 Midnight Blue (SOLD)
Joined: 06 Dec 2010
Posts: 2605
Location: Bangkok
Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:25 pm quote
northernerbill wrote:
I bet once youíve done it you will feel a lot better behind the bars.

Cell mate of Fletcher were you?
Molto Verboso
Kymco AK550
Joined: 09 Feb 2008
Posts: 1068
Location: UK
Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:51 pm quote
You should also ask an experienced rider to check the throttle/twistgrip action. Its possible that it won't open smoothly because of a sticking cable or something similar. For low speed control its perfectly OK to gently use the rear brake and a small amount of throttle simultaneously but as you get used to the sensitivity of the twistgrip you won't often need to use that technique. Also be careful in very low speed turns because applying a lot of right steering lock will usually tighten the throttle cable a small amount so have the rear brake covered at all times.
Addicted
Vespa GTS Super
Joined: 24 Jul 2014
Posts: 546
Location: London
Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:08 am quote
Tam Richardson wrote:
jimc wrote:
Surely you have to do the CBT before taking it out on the road anyway - or is it different in Scotland than England/Wales? I doubt you'll need individual training - if you can ride a bicycle you can ride a scooter - just be gentle with the throttle until you're used to it.
Yeah, in Scotland my driving licence automatically covers scooters up to 125cc. Anything more powerful and Iíd need need a new license. Although, in theory at 16 when you can get a provisional licence you could do your 1 day CBT and be out on the road with L plates on, that seems madness to me but there you go.

Itís definitely the throttle Iím struggling with. It feels loose to me when the bike is off, and that I canít be any gentler with the throttle, but Iíve nothing to compare it to with this being my first bike. The garage that did the MOT said everything was fine. Once I can master the throttle and get the bloody thing moving Iíll be fine and pick things up
Its doesnt mate, it will cover a 50cc if you have been driving cars for a certain amount of time, since 2000 I think. But you will definately need a CBT to be legal.
Member
Vespa Primavera 125
Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Posts: 7
Location: Edinburgh
Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:53 am quote
I took a few pictures of my pride and joy as well as a video of the throttle. Will try attaching the video in another post as it doesn't seem to want to attach, it's possibly taking my post size over the site limit.

Thanks for those that have kept me right re the CBT and my current license. I had always planned to do a CBT as didn't think I should be out on the road with no formal training. Although it looks like luck rather than design that I'll not break any laws given my poor understanding of what my license covers.

In hindsight I suspect a smaller bike would have been a better choice. With it being easier to learn on and also more reflecting my needs, I only really plan to use it to drive to work and to town etc so in the main probably rarely do over 40mph. Although that might change once I'm confident on it and enjoying the thrill of a ride. I just fell in love with this specific bike and, perhaps impulsively, thought that's the one for me.

Cheers,

Tam

IMG_1497.jpg

IMG_1498.jpg

Member
Vespa Primavera 125
Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Posts: 7
Location: Edinburgh
Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:04 am quote
Here's my attempt to attach the video of me moving the throttle. It is probably user error and just something I need to get used to, but to the uninitiated it feels like there's quite a bit of loose movement on the throttle that doesn't do anything. When I then turn it so I feel the throttle begin to actually work I can't seem to turn it gently enough not to suddenly take off. I effectively have to have the breaks (the back one anyway) full on just to be able to start to move at walking pace. Which may be what bikes are meant to do, but my concern is that I'll spend most of my time having to keep the break on, particularly the stop start nature of city centre driving.

Hopefully the Zip file works.

Cheers,

Tam

IMG_1496.zip
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Download
 Filename:  IMG_1496.zip
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Member
Vespa LX 125
Joined: 02 Nov 2018
Posts: 27
Location: London
Tue Jun 11, 2019 10:24 am quote
Is it me or does that bike look like a Primavera?

I like it whatever it is.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2007 LX150 2015 GTS 2013 BV 350
Joined: 13 Sep 2012
Posts: 8316
Location: Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
Tue Jun 11, 2019 11:02 am quote
Tam Richardson wrote:
In hindsight I suspect a smaller bike would have been a better choice. With it being easier to learn on and also more reflecting my needs, I only really plan to use it to drive to work and to town etc so in the main probably rarely do over 40mph. Although that might change once I'm confident on it and enjoying the thrill of a ride. I just fell in love with this specific bike and, perhaps impulsively, thought that's the one for me.

Cheers,

Tam
What typically happens is that starting with something small feels good, and adequate for starters. Then you get more confident, start loving riding, your short ride home becomes much longer, you wind up on faster roadways, and next thing you're lusting after something bigger. That's pretty much my own story. So unless you don't want the license, curb your regrets for the time being. The 125 is a great scooter. At the 40 mph mark a 50 is going to be rather lethargic, if it makes it that fast. Pulling out into traffic, keeping up with traffic is all a lot easier with the bigger engine. It's always nice to have some wiggle room.
Hooked
Joined: 06 Oct 2013
Posts: 150

Tue Jun 11, 2019 11:07 am quote
Itís all perception and perspective. If I jumped in a Cessna 172 with no instruction and attempted to fly it, if I didnít crash and kill myself I would at a minimum be terrified and see it as too much or too powerful. But the reality is it is one of the slower and one of the safest planes in the sky.

Go get some instruction. Sounds like you need it to be legal anyway.
Addicted
2009 LX 150, 2008 GTS 250
Joined: 19 Jun 2011
Posts: 673
Location: Birmingham, Alabama, USA
Tue Jun 11, 2019 11:41 am quote
Hi Tam,
Try using very brief applications of throttle. On,off, coast. Repeat.

Itís a skill you can use in very slow traffic.

Bill
Member
GTS 300
Joined: 11 May 2019
Posts: 20
Location: UK
Tue Jun 11, 2019 11:52 am quote
Firstly welcome.
Secondly book the CBT and enjoy the day of instruction but get the practice in.
Thirdly get insured and take the bike out and practice even more. As your experience grows so will your ability to ride and enjoy the bike even more.
Been a long time since I learned to ride a motorcycle but I assume you need L plates too.
Addicted
Vespa PX 125 Settantesimo
Joined: 01 Feb 2017
Posts: 523
Location: Norf Wheezy
Tue Jun 11, 2019 12:09 pm quote
Matt748 wrote:
Firstly welcome.
Secondly book the CBT and enjoy the day of instruction but get the practice in.
Thirdly get insured and take the bike out and practice even more. As your experience grows so will your ability to ride and enjoy the bike even more.
Been a long time since I learned to ride a motorcycle but I assume you need L plates too.
Yep, he will need L plates on the front and rear.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
GTS 300ABS, Buddy 125, Typhoon 125
Joined: 29 Dec 2007
Posts: 10653
Location: Oregon City, OR
Tue Jun 11, 2019 12:21 pm quote
Tam Richardson wrote:
In hindsight I suspect a smaller bike would have been a better choice. With it being easier to learn on and also more reflecting my needs, I only really plan to use it to drive to work and to town etc so in the main probably rarely do over 40mph. Although that might change once I'm confident on it and enjoying the thrill of a ride. I just fell in love with this specific bike and, perhaps impulsively, thought that's the one for me.
I disagree that you would be better off with a 50, or that a 50 is easier to learn to ride. The 50 Vespas and 125 Vespas are the same size, very close to the same weight, and handle just the same. If you can ride one, you can ride the other. The 125 has the huge advantage that it is able to keep up with traffic in more situations. Now go out there and take the CBT. What you need is some skills, some practice, and some self confidence.
Addicted
2016 Sprint S 150 (his), 2016 Sprint 150 Blu Gaiola (hers), 2006 GTS 250 Excalibur Gray (hers), 2006 GTS 250 Black (his)
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Location: Vermont
Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:44 pm quote
I noticed that the OP said the throttle seemed loose. I wonder if there is a lot of play in the twist prior to the fuel actually being delivered. I know I had a lot of play in the throttle on some used GTS250's I bought. My newer sprints are very responsive.
Member
Vespa Primavera 125
Joined: 10 Jun 2019
Posts: 7
Location: Edinburgh
Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:05 pm quote
wbdvt wrote:
I noticed that the OP said the throttle seemed loose. I wonder if there is a lot of play in the twist prior to the fuel actually being delivered. I know I had a lot of play in the throttle on some used GTS250's I bought. My newer sprints are very responsive.
I put a video up earlier, not sure if it worked or not, that showed how ďlooseĒ the throttle was when I twisted it. That may be completely normal, and the garage have checked it and said all was fine, so itís maybe just me getting used to a scooter thatís the problem. However I canít use the throttle any gentler when starting than I am and without having the back break fully on the sudden jump of power is uncontrollable, which again is maybe just my lack of experience/familiarity with scooters.
Addicted
2016 Sprint S 150 (his), 2016 Sprint 150 Blu Gaiola (hers), 2006 GTS 250 Excalibur Gray (hers), 2006 GTS 250 Black (his)
Joined: 21 Oct 2016
Posts: 597
Location: Vermont
Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:16 pm quote
The download did not work. I seem to remember that the throttle play is very small. I just checked my Sprint 150 and it tightens up/engages at <1/8" twist.
Addicted
2018 LIBERTY 150S
Joined: 26 Jul 2013
Posts: 642
Location: Ohio
Tue Jun 11, 2019 2:44 pm quote
Many scooters typically act like an "on/off" switch at first throttle. Feel it most annoyingly when wanting a touch more engine when turning into a side street. Scoot wants to lurch then. Takes getting used to. Nothing wrong with the scooter that does this.
Easier on a motorcycle -- you can feather the clutch into action.
O.S.
Hooked
2016 LXV 150 ie, 1978 Vespa P125, 2019 Piaggio Liberty 150
Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 461
Location: central Illinois USA
Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:32 pm quote
Itís a used scooter, any chance the throttle cable just needs a bit of adjustment, cables do stretch a bit when new, I know that was 1 of the items my dealership checked on the LXV at the first service. And I know things in the UK are different than here in the USA aka that pesky colony, but here a 125cc is considered small. People at work were shocked that I took the LXV Ďall the wayí to St Louis to meet up with the scooter group down there, they thought I loaded it in the truck and hauled it down. No, itís very capable of going down there on itís own wheels and that 150 has enough power to keep up with traffic.
The classes will give you good skills, proper knowledge and help you be more comfortable with riding, it will not be long before you are thinking that just a bit more power might be nice.
Ossessionato
BV350, Primavera 150, Yamaha Zuma 125
Joined: 06 Jun 2013
Posts: 2613
Location: The Twin Cities of Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota
Tue Jun 11, 2019 4:56 pm quote
There should be no more than 2-3mm of play in the throttle grip.
Ossessionato
2016 Vespa GTS 300 i.e. ABS, 2010 Vespa GTS 300 ie Super & 2003 Honda Shadow VT750 ACE (sold) & 2006 Vespa LX150 (sold)
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Posts: 2902
Location: Toronto (formerly Montreal)
Tue Jun 11, 2019 7:11 pm quote
fledermaus wrote:
Tam Richardson wrote:
In hindsight I suspect a smaller bike would have been a better choice. With it being easier to learn on and also more reflecting my needs, I only really plan to use it to drive to work and to town etc so in the main probably rarely do over 40mph. Although that might change once I'm confident on it and enjoying the thrill of a ride. I just fell in love with this specific bike and, perhaps impulsively, thought that's the one for me.

Cheers,

Tam
What typically happens is that starting with something small feels good, and adequate for starters. Then you get more confident, start loving riding, your short ride home becomes much longer, you wind up on faster roadways, and next thing you're lusting after something bigger. That's pretty much my own story. So unless you don't want the license, curb your regrets for the time being. The 125 is a great scooter. At the 40 mph mark a 50 is going to be rather lethargic, if it makes it that fast. Pulling out into traffic, keeping up with traffic is all a lot easier with the bigger engine. It's always nice to have some wiggle room.
I could not be more in agreement because that also perfectly describes my path as well.

In my case when I am learning to ride or drive, it helps me to understand how the transmission works so that I can visualize how twisting the throttle causes the bike to move. It sounds silly, but even with a GTS 300 or a Honda 750 twin cylinder motorcycle, you can coax the tiniest motion out of the rear wheel just by understanding the throttle. Itís something you can practice while sitting on the bike not going anywhere. Eventually you will come to understand all the other aspects of riding in the same intimate way. How the brakes work and react, centrifugal force and how it acts on the wheels, the force of wind... itís an amazing adventure. That 125 is a perfect start.

Welcome to MV from the Great White North!
Hooked
2013 GTS300ie
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 349
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Tue Jun 11, 2019 9:27 pm quote
Welcome to MV from sunny South Africa...!

Dual Sport motorcyclists ride with the first two fingers resting on the front brake lever.
This does two things:
1. It speeds up you reaction time in braking as you do not have to release the throttle first before applying pressure on the brake lever.
2. It prevents you from grabbing a fistful of throttle, making your throttle control less aggressive.
Try it.
Molto Verboso
Triumph Street Scrambler 2018, Suzuki VanVan200 (sold), 2015 Sprint 125 (sold)
Joined: 12 Apr 2015
Posts: 1764
Location: Finland
Tue Jun 11, 2019 10:03 pm quote
Tam Richardson wrote:
wbdvt wrote:
I noticed that the OP said the throttle seemed loose. I wonder if there is a lot of play in the twist prior to the fuel actually being delivered. I know I had a lot of play in the throttle on some used GTS250's I bought. My newer sprints are very responsive.
I put a video up earlier, not sure if it worked or not, that showed how ďlooseĒ the throttle was when I twisted it. That may be completely normal, and the garage have checked it and said all was fine, so itís maybe just me getting used to a scooter thatís the problem. However I canít use the throttle any gentler when starting than I am and without having the back break fully on the sudden jump of power is uncontrollable, which again is maybe just my lack of experience/familiarity with scooters.
At least I couldn't dowload the vid... as such, there's nothing wrong having the rear break full on, but easing it up with a gentle and small twist of throttle should work.

I started my riding with a 50cc geared bike... well, ages ago , and actually had my first variator driven scoot, 125cc Vespa just reasently. I can't remember noticing the "jump" effect very strongly, but mine was a brand new scoot. I do remember that my slow speed riding was not as smooth as with the bikes with clucth in the beginning. This was because I was without the help of clutch and front/rear brake handles were in the wrong places for a bike rider....my slow speed movements never got as smooth as with a geared bike, but with some practise I managed OK.

If you happen to have a friend with any experience of scooters, he/she would easily verify whether your scoot behaves in a normal way.
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