[NSR] You don't need a Vespa to get in trouble
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Tue Dec 03, 2019 2:36 am quote
Riding Vespa can have its risks, but I never expected a serious accident without me GTS. And now, I can use some advice...

Three months ago, I arrived on my bicycle (not on my Vespa!) at our barracks. The barrier was opened and I could enter. Exactly when I was going to pass the barrier, it closed, and halfway down, it threw me backwards off my bicycle and I hit the concrete with the back of my head. Knocked me out (guard later decleared he hadn't closed the barrier, barrier firm says no tech problem, investigation ongoing).

Don't ask me about the first three days on Intensive Care, lost all of that. I had a serious concussion wirh three bleedings. After 10 days of serious symptons, I was cleared and could go home. Had some serious cognitive issues, coordination, balance, amnesia and more. But that would go away within some weeks. Got a month sick leave. Alas, not the end of the story. A few week laters, I was diagnosed with post-concussion syndrome

After three months sick leave, I still have problems with balance, coordination, tinnitus and dizziness, especially after physical efforts. Driving a car results in too many impulses to be processed by the brain and to get all coordinated, resulting in being like drunk after a 15 minuts drive, even as passenger. The issues are getting better, but very very very slowly. Seems like this is an issue of many months. One luck, as it happend on the job, caused by the Army, no problem with being home or salary.

My question to any MV members who have experienced a similar issue: how to speed up recovery, or what things might help, or make things worse? According to the neurologist, just have patience and give it time. However, I have plenty of time now, too much time, and that's not a nice way to spend time. I read alot about PCS, but ther's little known about the processes in your flubber after a serious hit.

Worst of all, given de overload and resulting dizziness, I CAN'T DRIVE MY VESPA!!! I know, some might find that less important, but hell, it's a clear sign of my limitations, and how it affects my daily life

Any advice welcome!

At least, my Vespa isn't to blame. My GTS is a better friend than my bicycle

Last edited by FlandersWasp on Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:07 am; edited 3 times in total
Molto Verboso
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Moto Guzzi Airone 250 Sport 1951
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Location: Latina (Italy)
Tue Dec 03, 2019 2:54 am quote
Think about health first wich is to the first think...
Then ... you can consider that for a long time you won't be able to use a two-wheeled vehicle; as far as I know (personal experience following an accident with the Vespa in 1988) recovery is very slow, years or more ... but only if you take great care of yourself.
Driving will be the minimum of your goals, I apologize for being so raw but believe me ... I talk to you like a brother.
Addicted
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Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:10 am quote
Attila wrote:
Think about health first wich is to the first think...
Then ... you can consider that for a long time you won't be able to use a two-wheeled vehicle; as far as I know (personal experience following an accident with the Vespa in 1988) recovery is very slow, years or more ... but only if you take great care of yourself.
Driving will be the minimum of your goals, I apologize for being so raw but believe me ... I talk to you like a brother.
Thanks Atilla, no apologies needed, I rather get the facts than a doctor who says you'll be okay soon. Indeed, health first, but I'm not the type to sit and wait But I have reached the conclusion pretty soon that I have to take it easy, although it's not easy to take it easy. Riding Vespa, or thinking about it, will more or less be my health indicator. I certainly realize that riding now would be bad for me and my Vespa.
Molto Verboso
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Moto Guzzi Airone 250 Sport 1951
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Location: Latina (Italy)
Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:35 am quote
After my accident (with multiple fractures) I was diagnosed with necrotic pancreatitis caused by cancer; a cycle of operations and chemo followed whose effects left me unable to drive for five years.
Obviously every case is different ... the recovery is very much linked to a healthy lifestyle (well ... mine was not blameless, mea culpa ..).
The important thing is never to give up!
Come on ... stay with us and walk together to learn how to run later.
Hooked
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Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:37 am quote
Sorry to hear about your issues. Head injuries can be tough and I donít know of anything you can do to make the resulting concerns better but there may be.

I fell on my head on Senior Skip Day back in high school. I was crouched in the window of a car, feet on the door where the window goes down into and palms flat on the car roof. My buddy driving thought it would be funny to make a hard left. My next memory is being in the hospital where I stayed for a few days.

The biggest thing from my accident was losing my sense of smell for several years. I still remember the day, years later, that I realized I was smelling cotton candy when I was near some. Nowadays, some 30-something years later my sense of smell still isnít perfect. I canít smell farts, a blessing and a curse. Friends who know love to rip near me and then silently die laughing as I stay oblivious.

There is Occupational Therapy for people whoíve had strokes and other brain injuries. Not sure but maybe yo could benefit? Sounds like maybe youíre a vet so Iíd check out the VA and see what they can offer you. Itíd be free right?
Addicted
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Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:55 am quote
rob g wrote:
Sorry to hear about your issues. Head injuries can be tough and I donít know of anything you can do to make the resulting concerns better but there may be.

I fell on my head on Senior Skip Day back in high school. I was crouched in the window of a car, feet on the door where the window goes down into and palms flat on the car roof. My buddy driving thought it would be funny to make a hard left. My next memory is being in the hospital where I stayed for a few days.

The biggest thing from my accident was losing my sense of smell for several years. I still remember the day, years later, that I realized I was smelling cotton candy when I was near some. Nowadays, some 30-something years later my sense of smell still isnít perfect. I canít smell farts, a blessing and a curse. Friends who know love to rip near me and then silently die laughing as I stay oblivious.

There is Occupational Therapy for people whoíve had strokes and other brain injuries. Not sure but maybe yo could benefit? Sounds like maybe youíre a vet so Iíd check out the VA and see what they can offer you. Itíd be free right?
Holy c**p, you really had some bad luck back then. Loosing your smell must be akward. A weird thing I had in the first month was that I could hear music, and could understand talk, but when I heard music and singing or talking, I could not understand what he sang or said, although I could hear it perfectly. My brain seemed to recieve one process too many to copy with.

Luckily, I already progressed quite a bit. I kan walk, talk, read, no pain, no headache, and can even bicycle or car, but the latter two make me quite dizzy and kinda wacky, like being hitt by a stunn grenate. I feel perfectly fine, straddling around or in my coach, like I have no problem. Only, I can't do much or "get the physical bill" for what I did. Quite frustrating. Yes, veteran, Bob, money isn't issue, all gets payed, but money can't replace or fix a faulty pudding upstairs.
Hooked
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Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:56 pm quote
Sorry to hear about your misfortune. The good news is , you are recovering and it takes time . Everyone's recovery is different , no matter what the Dr's say you will know what is right for you.

In my case it was a Thorasic stroke , left me paralysed and in a wheel chair for a bit . Then it was grueling physical therapy and occupational therapy .

There was some talk that I might not ever really be able to walk properly unaided again.

But I knew in my heart they were wrong.
At this point 3 years and 11 months later , I'm walking short distances with a cane , can do 30 minutes on my elipticle machine .
But the best thing is I am back to riding again.

Some day's it's a lot harder to get up and just try .I admit to losing motivation, and being lazy at times. But I'll never give up and hope you feel the same.

Don't let the bastards get you down
Addicted
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 2:32 am quote
DandyDoug wrote:
Sorry to hear about your misfortune. The good news is , you are recovering and it takes time . Everyone's recovery is different , no matter what the Dr's say you will know what is right for you.

In my case it was a Thorasic stroke , left me paralysed and in a wheel chair for a bit . Then it was grueling physical therapy and occupational therapy .

There was some talk that I might not ever really be able to walk properly unaided again.

But I knew in my heart they were wrong.
At this point 3 years and 11 months later , I'm walking short distances with a cane , can do 30 minutes on my elipticle machine .
But the best thing is I am back to riding again.

Some day's it's a lot harder to get up and just try .I admit to losing motivation, and being lazy at times. But I'll never give up and hope you feel the same.

Don't let the bastards get you down
Thanks for your story Doug. One thing 's for sure, when one thinks he's in the greatest sh*t, there alwyas another person fighting a tougher battle. And reading that you are back to riding, is great news. When you're with your back against the wall, there's only one way to go, although mostly not the easiest.

It's actually weired, I have no longer any physical issues, apart from the brain. You sit there and think, I feel fine, no problems. Until you start doing things the brain must orchestrate. Not great for the motivation, and other people can't even see what's wrong with you. Took me a month to figure out why I had trouble with some basic things and to understand what functions and processes were required for something you want to do. You need the brain for everything, although the only time you feel that your brain is really working is when "you think".

Take riding or driving. You don't even "think" when you're riding, it seems to go all automatically. While driving, you might be thinking about the weather, about having to feed the cat, an appointment tomorrow. You don't realize the countless higly precise observations and precise adjustments you're brain is working on. A single tiny neuron broken, forget riding! Those are a few very tiny little bastard taking you down. Really weird.

Doug, You had a very big basterd to take one, and I'm glad you managed to beat him. In my 37th years military, several tours, so I'm no pussy, but suddenly you really really realize that life is so fragile. We're nothing! Hearing your story and progress is part of my hope and motivation, keep up the spirit Doug! Thanks!
Molto Verboso
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Moto Guzzi Airone 250 Sport 1951
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
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Location: Latina (Italy)
Wed Dec 04, 2019 2:47 am quote
If I can give a little advice that can partially mitigate your desire to go on a Vespa ...
Look for and buy a vintage Vespa, a lighthouse on the 50s fender to be restored and use part of your time to bring it back to its old splendor.
The therapy consists of the work you do on it, including pieces ...
Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 5:33 am quote
The suggestion of working with an occupational therapist is a good one. Find one who is experienced in brain injuries or if that isnít possible one who works with stroke survivors. They should be able to help retrain your brain. After all the bleeding from your concussion is similar to a stroke.

Good luck with your recovery.
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 7:21 am quote
cdwise wrote:
The suggestion of working with an occupational therapist is a good one. Find one who is experienced in brain injuries or if that isnít possible one who works with stroke survivors. They should be able to help retrain your brain. After all the bleeding from your concussion is similar to a stroke.
Good luck with your recovery.
Thanks Cheryl, you're right. Neurologist simply told me not to avoid things you have problems with, but train and practice tehm as much as possible, or go to a physiotherapist. That's easy to say, and I understand the physical part, but the average physiotherapist, and me, have no idea how to train purele cognitive processes. For instance, I'm a fluent typist, but hell, I have to read over and correct my posts here several times, despite typing alot. Keep swithing letters, like wehre, froget or lihtg. Never done before, and so weird. No average physiotherapist can help me with that. Will ask the doc. Good tip!
Hooked
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:27 am quote
Don't limit your searches to just post-concussion syndrome. There are some decent web resources for traumatic brain injury as well. Medically speaking, "traumatic" just means "acquired." One resource that helped me is the Georgia based Shepherd Center website.
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:35 am quote
Cheshire wrote:
Don't limit your searches to just post-concussion syndrome. There are some decent web resources for traumatic brain injury as well. Medically speaking, "traumatic" just means "acquired." One resource that helped me is the Georgia based Shepherd Center website.
Interesting link Cheshire. Gonna read up there, starting here: https://www.shepherd.org/patient-programs/brain-injury

Still feels strange, to see it as a brain injury, which it definitely is, while everything "seems" to work... more or less.
Hooked
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:47 am quote
I found a lot of the adaptations I use from thinking creatively. The music and lyrics thing, for example. I mis-hear things a lot, and as luck would have it it's usually at just the wrong moment that the words go weird. So... I use closed captioning. The downside is you start to realize just how awful a lot of those services are. (Hulu is the worst.)

If you don't have a smartphone or the like, I highly recommend getting one. My iPhone has made the difference between being able to live independently or having to rely on other people...my short-term memory took the biggest hit from my TBI.

Hang in there. You got yours diagnosed pretty early (within the first year) and that's going to make a huge positive difference. It took me seven years to realize something was off and another year to get a diagnosis.

Edit to add: on the smartphone thing...the phone part is the least important. The ability to set repeating reminders and calendar events that remind me I'm supposed to be getting ready to do something is what I really rely on, as well as GPS. I joke a lot about it. "My phone tells me what to do and I just follow orders," and "I don't know how I got here, I just turn where Siri tells me to."
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 10:40 am quote
Cheshire wrote:
Hang in there. You got yours diagnosed pretty early (within the first year) and that's going to make a huge positive difference. It took me seven years to realize something was off and another year to get a diagnosis.

Edit to add: on the smartphone thing...the phone part is the least important. The ability to set repeating reminders and calendar events that remind me I'm supposed to be getting ready to do something is what I really rely on, as well as GPS. I joke a lot about it. "My phone tells me what to do and I just follow orders," and "I don't know how I got here, I just turn where Siri tells me to."
Early diagnosis is spot on. The neurologist in the hospilal was excellent, but the follow-up some weeks later was another neurologist who just told me "all is fine". Not happy with that, I asked my doc, who received the report, and he explained in detail what as wrong. This doesn't change anything, but helps you cope with it and don't panic about the weird things. Still, finding out what's wrong is one thing, explaining it to others while you "look ok" is another thing, as you need their understanding and support. In a way, deciding to throw it on MV is kinda part of the processing.

The memory indeed needs support. Luckily, I'm quite organized, not least because in the military, timings, meetings and structure are the norm. Tp me, electronic calanders, post-it and alike are the center of the universe.

By the way, also had a bleeding around brainstem at the cerebellum. So, the Shepherd video, mentioning the cerebellum rang a bell. Coordination and timing, being clumsy, little drunk-alike... oooh my. Luckily big progress there, but it still needs fine-tuning. Oh well, one advantage I have, I'm a science geek, and what my brain curently does is a most interesting experience (humour also helps)

Talking video, this reminds me - finally! - to this TED video. Sets things in perspective... wow

Molto Verboso
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 11:45 am quote
Wow - Bad Luck - Dog Gone It, Get Better Soon
I always wear my helmet on my scooter, but, I have made fun of people
wearing safety helmets when they ride bicycles. I may have to change my thinking about head gear on a bicycle.

When I was a youngster (60 years ago), no one wore safety head gear.
Additionally, most adults did not ride bicycles. If you saw an adult on a
bicycle, you assumed he lost his drivers license repeatedly driving drunk.

Best wishes for a complete recovery. I hope all brain functions just snap back in like your sense of smell did - but completely.

Bob Copeland
Minnesota
Colder than a Well Diggers Behind here!
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 12:04 pm quote
Thx Bob. Indeed, helmet on a bicycle, not for me, because I ride safely and thus never cause an accident...

And then the accident came to me. My first purchase when I can drive my car far enough, or the missus drives me, will be a bicycle helmet. Two things to take in account:

1. A second concussion before the first is healed is either lethal or dissabilitating, because it will swell too fast. A concussion often affects self-regulation of pressure in the brain. A second one during that period... add the numbers.

2. The older you get, the more risk for post-concussion issues, read longer or lasting symptons.

My first lesson back then in IC: wear helmet, it's not worth screwing up your old day. I f***ing retire in 21 months, and I want to enjoy it, I may hope.
Hooked
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 12:52 pm quote
I have just enough military friends to know that I don't know what I'm talking about, but...if you're still active duty, will that be more favorable to something like disability pay than if you'd already retired? Just a silver lining hopeful thought.

On helmets: I mean...pre-injury, I averaged 30 mph pedaling on flat ground and could sprint up to 40. My record was a little over 55mph on the last downhill going to college...I lived for the "WTF" looks on car drivers that tried to pass me as we crested the hill. We wear a helmet on scooters and motorcycles for the same speeds. Even standing still, pavement is pavement.
I biked because 300-400 miles/week that didn't go into a gas tank wasn't something to sneeze at (my car at the time got 20-25 mpg) and I didn't need a gym membership.
We're learning quite a bit more about head injuries and concussions in the past couple decades. Military and professional sports injuries are where the research is currently.
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 1:08 pm quote
I had an extremely bad auto racing accident over 60 years ago. Needless to say I had a concussion and severe head injuries. I had/have no recall of event or the first several weeks after. Spent 1 1/2 years in military hospital. The only thing I can say about an injury like yours is to have patience and as much time as necessary for recovery before you ready to get back into action.

An updated version of the below is the Old Racer's Motto:

Old breaks ache,
The pain is chronic,
The glory is long faded,
Where did all the chicks go?
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 2:19 pm quote
Nope Cheshire, I want to work again ASAP, with the amendment "when I'm fit again". Meanwhile full pay while during service, caused by service. Might end in commision/hearing that keeps status or sends you in disability, but with little loss due to max years of service. Now 54 and currently desk work, so working wouldn't be a problem, but will have to wait a little more. The sooner back in my unit, the better. I'll manage to serve those last say 20 months. Tha's my goal! Had my first serious concussion 29 years ago, in service due to service (becoming a theme, damn) but not as bad as now, only one month sick leave and three months headeach. Now, I'd give money for that easy escape. Exiting career, veteran, but eventually beaten by a bicycle, never imagined Military humour...

Last edited by FlandersWasp on Wed Dec 04, 2019 2:49 pm; edited 1 time in total
Addicted
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 2:40 pm quote
Tazio, having no recall is the only good thing about it. As for the racer's motto, I again had luck, the chicks came to my hospital bed.

My old car accident, at least ten overturns (don't ask) was also serious, but also rather funny. Back then, first two days in a German hospital, dizzy, but no other problems, flexible as a gymnast. Cool! Third morning, wake up, whole body blue and black, entirely bruised and could not move. Me pushing button, HELP, what's this!? Answer Doc: ah, good, shock is over and body resumes normal reactions. WTF?!? Fun was suddenly over. But really weird how the brain stops many processes, not important for survival. But the pain does come later on.
Ossessionato
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Wed Dec 04, 2019 4:12 pm quote
Wow. I got nuthin but wishing you good luck!

The pavement doesn't really care whether or not your wheels are motorized, I reckon.
Molto Verboso
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Thu Dec 05, 2019 7:10 am quote
Professional Car Racing
FlandersWasp & Tazio,

Hey you guys are a different breed - racing cars is just plain dangerous.
I admire your bravado, but as a devote "chicken" I belong on the side line
watching you.

You have a need for speed,

Bob Copeland
Frost Bite Falls, MN
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Thu Dec 05, 2019 7:48 am quote
Re: Professional Car Racing
Bob Copeland wrote:
FlandersWasp & Tazio,

Hey you guys are a different breed - racing cars is just plain dangerous.
I admire your bravado, but as a devote "chicken" I belong on the side line
watching you.

You have a need for speed,

Bob Copeland
Frost Bite Falls, MN
Haha, hold your horses, Bob, I'm not a racer. My last - and worst - concussion was on a bicycle at 12 Mph, cause by someone else. My first concussion - little less worse - was in my car at 110 Mph, a legally allowed speed, and caused by the car in front of me who lost his huge rear bumper, and then fled the scene.

Okay, I agree, that last one needs some explaining. First, this was on route from our barracks in Germany on the Autobahn, at some places without speed limit, you are allowed to drive 150 Mph, or 300 Mph, if you like. You better not, but some do, and if you do 100, you may seem slow at times, doing 65 can be hazardous. My 110 Mph in my Audi was pretty safe, until mister nice guy ahead of me drove a car that was literally falling apart (probably the reason why he fled). I admit, even an Audi cannot evade or run over a large bumper at such speeds. The only part not crumbled in the car was the whole passenger area (bonus points for Audi). The whole event is completely unknown to me, which the neurlogist confirmed to the Polizei, and they told me, if you do this again, buy again an Audi. I did... I mean buy, not do again. These days, no more high speeds for me, and they are be default not allowed in Belgium.... And now a bicycle almost kills me. Oh Irony. Actually, even driving non-armoured vehicles though mine fields in the 90's (now luckily armoured) seemed less hazardous than a bicycly today. Relativity is everything.

Note: today, only every few years I return to Germany, and I noticed there are now far fewer roads without speed limit, and even if they are, traffic is often so dense or jammed that riding as fast as in the old days becomes less common. I think that's a good thing.

Bob, you're not a chicke, you're a sensible guy. Age and experience does the job, also to me. Here, speed is now hardly an issue any more. The younger generation doesn't need speed to be dangerous, they now have texting, a.k.a. driving blind, which IMHO is far more dangerous.

A tip to anyone who rides bicycle:
    1991 -> 110 mph with car, more than 10 x flipovers in various directions = firm concussion and a lot of buises (passenger compartment held pretty well, thank you Audi).
    2019 -> 12 mph with bicycle, 1 x throw backwards = traumatic brain injury with three bleedings. Far far worse than 110 mph excursion
    Conclusion: injury risk vs speed is deceitfully relative. Bicycle helmet is a good idea and on my shopping list

IMPORTANT NOTE: I am NOT advertising high speed car driving! Although legal on parts of Autobahn without speed limit, I do not recommend, nor approve, and not doing this since decades.

Times are changing...

Dsc02367.jpg
28 years ago. Phisically a lot safer than my latest bicycle excursion to work... but costlier than a bicycle

Dsc02368.jpg

Dsc02366.jpg



Last edited by FlandersWasp on Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:47 pm; edited 2 times in total
Ossessionato
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Thu Dec 05, 2019 1:53 pm quote
When I hit that deer some years ago I had a TBI, brain bleed, calcium phosphate crystals outside of my cochlea, broken ribs and a broken clavicle.

So, dizziness, loss of memory, pain in moving, etc. Same as you as far as the concussive brain damage. The "dizziness" took about 6 months so I could walk without listing to the side like a sinking ship. The cognitive functions were a point of waiting until I could get new pathways burned in the brain since they couldn't go through the broken ones.

What I did to speed that up was downloading a jigsaw puzzle game and Word Cookies for the iPad. I forced myself to do a jigsaw puzzle every day and play the Word Cookies (find as many words with the letters given) as I could. It forced me to think of ways to find a solution to the puzzle and I think it built new pathways.

Some of my memories are gone and I have to accept it. Long term memories are still there. So, at work I ask anyone I'm talking to on the phone to send me an email with what we talked about because my short term memory is horrible and people usually do that for me.

Good luck to you.
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Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:39 pm quote
dmpawley wrote:
What I did to speed that up was downloading a jigsaw puzzle game and Word Cookies for the iPad. I forced myself to do a jigsaw puzzle every day and play the Word Cookies (find as many words with the letters given) as I could. It forced me to think of ways to find a solution to the puzzle and I think it built new pathways.

Some of my memories are gone and I have to accept it. Long term memories are still there. So, at work I ask anyone I'm talking to on the phone to send me an email with what we talked about because my short term memory is horrible and people usually do that for me.

Good luck to you.
Thansk for sharing. You had a rough time too, but also ideas. How long took the cognitive issue to end? All over now, except the memory?

Ideas, ideas. Better than wait till it comes back. As I started typing again (alot by now for these posts) I discovered I switched letter, whish I never did. So I type more and more, read it over, correct it, forget some, correct again (you see at the "last edited by...") Let's learn some new neurons typing and reading. I'll take your advice and also start programming again.

Im Flemish (Dutch language) so using my English, French and German should help. Maybe a head start (what's in a word). I once read that the more languages a person speaks, the better his brain keeps in shape. I remember that! Can't hurt.

I had no memories at all after the big bang, and even didn't quite remember who visited me in the hospital. Worst was no memories of last vacation or things long time ago, as hard as I tried. But by looking back at pictures, it comes back. Many new discoveries! My memory stick is in need of a refresh. I was already a post-it freak before, so already ahead with that solution. I never created a postwhere I added so much bla bla myself. Oh well, what doesn't hurt you might help. I'm morphing Modern Vespa into Memory Vespa. Free therapy! Have some spare humour for a couple of months, but rather not longer. We'll see...

Funny that you mention the sinking ship. Meanwhile, my dizzyness is better when doing no efforts, but when I walk through a darker place, I divert to the right, or hit a door frame. My balance organs were checked and ok, it's the neurons, in my little brain, told the doc little... rude dude

45 minutes for this post. Hell yeah. Big pause now.
Hooked
2013 GTS 300ie
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Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Fri Dec 06, 2019 6:57 pm quote
Oh, for crying out....
I just noticed you're from Belgium. I don't know WHY, but I saw "military" and my brain jumped straight to US military and the wires fused. Well...I DO know why. I'd go bang my head on a post out of frustration, but I think the damage is already done, right? I swear...that kind of wire-crossing gets me in SO much trouble at the worst possible moments....

Thanks for the good humor with my military question...and apologies for the US hospital website suggestion. Unless you got some decent info from it...then !!
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2014 GTS 300ie
Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Posts: 705
Location: Belgium
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:05 am quote
Cheshire wrote:
Oh, for crying out....
I just noticed you're from Belgium. I don't know WHY, but I saw "military" and my brain jumped straight to US military and the wires fused. Well...I DO know why. I'd go bang my head on a post out of frustration, but I think the damage is already done, right? I swear...that kind of wire-crossing gets me in SO much trouble at the worst possible moments....

Thanks for the good humor with my military question...and apologies for the US hospital website suggestion. Unless you got some decent info from it...then !!
Hi Cheshire, no problem. All info on the www is appreciated. We're all in the same team. However, I think that US military healthcare has far more expertise than ours, from severe injuries to tinnitus. I'm not telling we're not good here, but just much much smaller. Bigger numbers means more cases, thus more experience and more money. The problems regarding accepting mil related injuries, support and funding are not obvious, but that's rather a problem than a military issue.

I get you! My frustration level can peak at times, but I have to admit, TBI is a fascinating thing. I keep discovering tiny little things that don't work, and why they don't. Usually, it's an issue of senses-brain-muscle feedback loops a fraction to slow. A tiny detail, but with quite some stange effects. Just have to keep those neurons training. Frustration is getting better, but the neuro dude had to tell me straightway what was - or might be- ahead, to save me from false hopes on fast recovery. He surely knew, as it was a serious hit on concrete after all, no walk in the park. But we'll get there.
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