Greatest changes in Scooter Culture over the last 10 years
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
Honda CTX 700 DN Automatic Motorcycle
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Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:10 am quote
Years ago, when I first started riding, there was a great lack in ladies gear. Now, there's plenty (via inter webs) to choose from.

This may not be a big deal to many, but to some of us. it's HUGE. We don't have to wear ill fitting mens gear and we can choose our riding "looks". So happy that we have more than just "pink" gear and lady riders are taken much more seriously by many industries.

What have you noticed, in the span of the last 10 years, that has changed within scooter/riding culture? Was it for the better or for the worse?
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
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Thu Jan 16, 2020 10:09 am quote
Some questions...
1) are you a female? (I don't know you and i need it to answer you)
2) is the topic only for women or is it a question addressed to everyone?
3) in Italy the scooter has always been experienced by women as a means of emancipation and many have not been seen riding motorcycles until the late 1980s
4) here the technical clothing worn by women is brought mainly by motorcyclists, here those who go by scooter never wear specific clothing except perhaps the jacket and gloves but mainly at low temperatures
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P200 PX150
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Thu Jan 16, 2020 10:21 am quote
Availability of the old shifty scoots and parts has diminished substantially (and the prices are nuts for quality vintage).
Addicted
Vespa PX 177 Settantesimo, Vespa GTS Super 300 HPE
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Location: London
Thu Jan 16, 2020 10:32 am quote
Can't say I have noticed anything in that time period. Maybe there are less youngsters riding shifties now but I still see a lot of P series bikes about. I don't wear any specific bike gear so clueless as to the advances there.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
GTS 300ABS, Buddy 125, Buddy Kick 125
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Location: Oregon City, OR
Thu Jan 16, 2020 10:52 am quote
I used to frequent some of the surplus shops for gear suitable for riding and winter sports at low cost. Those sources have pretty much dried up in the past decade. The few surplus stores that still exist carry mostly junk.
Hooked
2020 SuperTech, GTS300, 71Rally 180, 64VBB, 79&80 P200
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Thu Jan 16, 2020 11:04 am quote
The two stroke Stella, the last vestige of the old Vespas you could buy as a new vehicle, disappeared from the market. And most significant for me, my wife started riding. We’ve made it to most of the Amerivespas in the last decade too.

Last edited by usmusket on Thu Jan 16, 2020 11:31 am; edited 1 time in total
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2001 Vespa ET4 150
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Location: Florida
Thu Jan 16, 2020 11:18 am quote
Funny, you mention women's gear. My wife and I both ride motorcycles and the gear for her is mostly fashion based and not rider based. I will state that it is changing and the demographic of the female motorcycle rider is growing and in part the companies are starting to get it.
My wife rides a Harley Davidson and she hates some of the clothes for riding as a v-neck on a bike is bothersome especially if you get a bee down your shirt (she has had it happen). She has started seeing more riding designed clothes for women and many of them do have feminine flair and fit to them, which allows for safety and style.

On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Thu Jan 16, 2020 11:33 am quote
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
Member
2001 Vespa ET4 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2019
Posts: 12
Location: Florida
Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:12 pm quote
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I do ride it as my main form of transportation. My Scion is my back up and my wife has the nice SUV as her primary.




That is my '06 Softail. I average about 12 to 15k miles a year on it. I have ridden to Tenn, Georgia, N.C., and S.C.. Done the tail of the Dragon and a bunch of others. Been riding in storms for a couple of hours or so. I love to ride.
Ossessionato
Triumph Street Scrambler 2018, Suzuki VanVan200 (sold), 2015 Sprint 125 (sold)
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Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:26 pm quote
Good or bad news first?

Let's start with the good ones: motorcycle gear, clothes, helmets, are not only hugely safer than 10 years ago, but also more comfortable and functional. Textile with Gore-Tex and various strong materials don't have to shy from the best leather gear 10 years ago. The armour is super comfortable, affordable helmets have sun visors... and what not.

New bikes themselves are good to ride, powerfull and safe. Even the poorest ones are better and the best ones are just amazing.

And the bad news... in Finland, the new registrations of all 2-wheelers is half of what it was in 2010. The average age of a bike owner is climbing up, the last time I saw it was way over 40 years old. We have on average bad weather and good incomes, bikes are not as attractive as they used to be.

Last edited by RRider on Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
Ossessionato
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Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:27 pm quote
Scooter forums have declined in popularity.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:28 pm quote
Prof Rene wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I do ride it as my main form of transportation. My Scion is my back up and my wife has the nice SUV as her primary.

That is my '06 Softail. I average about 12 to 15k miles a year on it. I have ridden to Tenn, Georgia, N.C., and S.C.. Done the tail of the Dragon and a bunch of others. Been riding in storms for a couple of hours or so. I love to ride.
Cool! I think it may just be that WEB-Tech and I both work in.. wait for it... tech. I get your point and understand there are really 2 groups of us that ride. Those that like gadgets and those that don't. I like my toys and the tech available now for riding really has come along in the last decade. I like my GPS, Sena systems, ABS/ASR and the other advices that have come along. The safety advantage of ABS/ASR cannot be ignored whether you like it or not and is here to stay. The other gadgets... use them or don't use them and that's all good. They have certainly advanced in the last 10 years though.
Ossessionato
2009 GTV250 (Gone), 2003 Inder trailer, 2001 BMW R1100RT
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Posts: 4564
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Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:46 pm quote
Closure of so many scooter/Vespa dealers. Mine closed ~7 years ago. It forced me to figure out how to maintain my own bike which was a good thing.

Best
Miguel
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Honda CTX 700 DN Automatic Motorcycle
Joined: 08 Oct 2008
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Location: Naperville, Illinois
Thu Jan 16, 2020 1:12 pm quote
Attila wrote:
Some questions...
1) are you a female? (I don't know you and i need it to answer you)
2) is the topic only for women or is it a question addressed to everyone?
3) in Italy the scooter has always been experienced by women as a means of emancipation and many have not been seen riding motorcycles until the late 1980s
4) here the technical clothing worn by women is brought mainly by motorcyclists, here those who go by scooter never wear specific clothing except perhaps the jacket and gloves but mainly at low temperatures
I am Female and the topic is for everyone and is not gear-centric. It could be about anything.

Riding gear in the states has been kinda of set in stone since the development of the motorcycle. The fact that gear is changing and there are so many more styles available, is a real change.
Addicted
GTS 300 Super
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Thu Jan 16, 2020 2:07 pm quote
When I first joined this forum just prior and during my time on the LX150, there seemed to be more Clubs especially out here in this part of California (Sacramento is a GREAT area to ride a Scooter most of the year!)

There seems to be a bigger divide between the Vintage and Modern tribes. The few clubs seem to be vintage focused and very insular. I'm not sure what happened locally between the vintage vs modern clubs but it appears the modern vespa clubs went away while the vintage seem to be going strong.

10 years ago was also the height of the recession and it seems like for economic reasons there were also more Scooters out on the road than there is now.

Technology, smart phone technology allows for much more in depth knowledge of your bike as you can be synced with your Scooter. Ease of travelling (Via a GPS map app). Getting a Bluetooth speaker or headphones and you can play your music or even have a phone conversation in your helmet. The technology was there but it has advanced and gotten much better than it was 10 years ago. Sadly drivers in the cars being that much more NOT aware of us riding near them due to this advance in technology is VERY noticeable!

It's starting to slowly seep into the scene but I'm intrigued by the new Electronic vehicles. I truly thought Bio-Diesel/Hybrid technology was going to be the next generation of vehicles. Tesla kinda crushed that movement and jumped the production of electric vehicles.

Ride Share/rental of bikes and "scooters" I find it now silly if someone gets a DUI with the wide availability of Ride Shares. Having recently traveled through Germany-Austria-Slovakia and Hungary. The presence of rental bikes and Scooters is not just localized to America and my part of the country. Why do I bring this up? It could be part of the reason I am seeing less scooters on the road but also as added traffic on the roads. It is something I notice I have to pay more attention to them (Not uncommon for people operating the rental "scooters" and bikes running lights, swerving out into lanes with no awareness of traffic conditions around them)
Addicted
2013 GTS 300ie
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Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Thu Jan 16, 2020 4:47 pm quote
(Keep in mind, this is written from an american perspective, as well as a personal one. Some of these things may be different in other countries and continents.)

EFI became a Thing.
The shifting scooter became extinct.
The larger displacement scooter bracket, especially for mid-sized scooters, pretty much disappeared. (I really had hopes for owning a new Scarabeo 500.)
There was the Great Gas Crunch and Scooter Boom ...and then bust.
So, so many advancements in technology, both for the bike and rider.

IMHO, those are the big ones relating to Mod Life (scooter culture).
Member
2001 Vespa ET4 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2019
Posts: 12
Location: Florida
Thu Jan 16, 2020 7:04 pm quote
Harbinger wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I do ride it as my main form of transportation. My Scion is my back up and my wife has the nice SUV as her primary.

That is my '06 Softail. I average about 12 to 15k miles a year on it. I have ridden to Tenn, Georgia, N.C., and S.C.. Done the tail of the Dragon and a bunch of others. Been riding in storms for a couple of hours or so. I love to ride.
Cool! I think it may just be that WEB-Tech and I both work in.. wait for it... tech. I get your point and understand there are really 2 groups of us that ride. Those that like gadgets and those that don't. I like my toys and the tech available now for riding really has come along in the last decade. I like my GPS, Sena systems, ABS/ASR and the other advices that have come along. The safety advantage of ABS/ASR cannot be ignored whether you like it or not and is here to stay. The other gadgets... use them or don't use them and that's all good. They have certainly advanced in the last 10 years though.
Oh, don't get me wrong I love tech. I have built my own computers and taught myself all kinds of things. I enjoy learning about the latest advancements and think the gadgets on my wife's car are awesome. I have ridden Road Glides with nav and stereos and they are a blast to ride, but I love the feel of my bikes versus some of the land yacht looking things I have seen as my goto.
Hooked
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Joined: 21 Jan 2018
Posts: 269
Location: Wales
Thu Jan 16, 2020 7:44 pm quote
Belkwinith wrote:
Years ago, when I first started riding, there was a great lack in ladies gear. Now, there's plenty (via inter webs) to choose from.

This may not be a big deal to many, but to some of us. it's HUGE. We don't have to wear ill fitting mens gear and we can choose our riding "looks". So happy that we have more than just "pink" gear and lady riders are taken much more seriously by many industries.

What have you noticed, in the span of the last 10 years, that has changed within scooter/riding culture? Was it for the better or for the worse?
In our rural area of Wales I have noticed scooters are on the increase and regular commutes come rain or shine (mostly rain here) on a 30mile run to work at times depending on which county school I am in the ratio is approx 50% women riders on scooters. A higher percentage of men on motorcycles. Both motorcycle shops here have a good range of clothing one owned by a lady and other by a couple all into riding. Bad things is young Timothy and Tabatha tosspot's who just past there car test and drive right up your ass and stupidly on single track roads.
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
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Location: Latina (Italy)
Fri Jan 17, 2020 12:13 am quote
Years ago it was fashionable to go to the North Cape from Italy ... now everything has changed, we load the motorbike or scooter on the trolley and take pictures of it; a friend of mine wanted to copy the North Cape sign and take the photo in front ... too difficult to be an assault motorcyclist today and, generally, if you have a scooter you also have a tendency to adopt minimal clothing.
There is no technical clothing that holds for some motorcyclists (I am the first), the cold is there and if you do not carry a stove behind you, you also feel it (especially) in the brain.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Fri Jan 17, 2020 5:01 am quote
My guess would be a the large motorbike supply ships around here the ratio is probably about 70-1 mens gear to women's. Still plenty of selection though and I do know a lot of ladies don't mind wearing some mens stuff. My wife has 3 jackets including 2 that are basically a female version of 2 of my REV'IT jackets. For helmets while they are unisex (mostly?) the colour selection is amazing as well as the styles. Plenty of choices for the discerning female motorbike rider. Another think I think we are seeing more of is training schools with courses geared towards women and the more ladies riding the better I say!
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 3991
Location: Latina (Italy)
Fri Jan 17, 2020 5:13 am quote
Belkwinith wrote:
Attila wrote:
Some questions...
1) are you a female? (I don't know you and i need it to answer you)
2) is the topic only for women or is it a question addressed to everyone?
3) in Italy the scooter has always been experienced by women as a means of emancipation and many have not been seen riding motorcycles until the late 1980s
4) here the technical clothing worn by women is brought mainly by motorcyclists, here those who go by scooter never wear specific clothing except perhaps the jacket and gloves but mainly at low temperatures
I am Female and the topic is for everyone and is not gear-centric. It could be about anything.

Riding gear in the states has been kinda of set in stone since the development of the motorcycle. The fact that gear is changing and there are so many more styles available, is a real change.
.... thanks ... sorry but the term "gear" in Italian has no equal, it indicates the gear wheel that is used in mechanics ...
I guess it's a grammatical metaphor but yes, I understand the meaning of the topic.
Harbinger wrote:
My guess would be a the large motorbike supply ships around here the ratio is probably about 70-1 mens gear to women's. Still plenty of selection though and I do know a lot of ladies don't mind wearing some mens stuff. My wife has 3 jackets including 2 that are basically a female version of 2 of my REV'IT jackets. For helmets while they are unisex (mostly?) the colour selection is amazing as well as the styles. Plenty of choices for the discerning female motorbike rider. Another think I think we are seeing more of is training schools with courses geared towards women and the more ladies riding the better I say!
Don't tell me ... do you take training courses for a driver's license or do you continue to do so even if you already have one?
Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Fri Jan 17, 2020 5:29 am quote
Attila wrote:
Harbinger wrote:
My guess would be a the large motorbike supply ships around here the ratio is probably about 70-1 mens gear to women's. Still plenty of selection though and I do know a lot of ladies don't mind wearing some mens stuff. My wife has 3 jackets including 2 that are basically a female version of 2 of my REV'IT jackets. For helmets while they are unisex (mostly?) the colour selection is amazing as well as the styles. Plenty of choices for the discerning female motorbike rider. Another think I think we are seeing more of is training schools with courses geared towards women and the more ladies riding the better I say!
Don't tell me ... do you take training courses for a driver's license or do you continue to do so even if you already have one?
You only need to take 2 courses to get your full M in Ontario though technically you do not need to take any just pass the tests. However a lot of people choose to go through a school and it is the better way to do it IMHO. I try and take a course every summer in the advanced training classes and I know they have helped make me a better rider. I also enjoy them and the school I use has great instructors. It's alway a hard but fun weekend and I am usually absolutely exhausted by the end.
Grumpy Biker
1980 Vespa P200e (sold), 2002 Vespa ET4 (sold), 1949 Harley-Davidson FL
Joined: 27 Oct 2009
Posts: 4758
Location: Chandler, Arizona, USA
Fri Jan 17, 2020 5:46 am quote
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I rode a 1949 Harley-Davidson as my only transportation from 2003-2015. It has no instrumentation (no speedo, clock, fuel gauge), no turn signals, no radio, etc. Not even an electric start. Riding everyday does not create a need for these things, although some might enjoy those creature comforts. I agree 100% with Prof Rene. I love the mechanical nature of old machines. I feel much more connected to them.

-Craig
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 3991
Location: Latina (Italy)
Fri Jan 17, 2020 5:59 am quote
Harbinger wrote:
Attila wrote:
Harbinger wrote:
My guess would be a the large motorbike supply ships around here the ratio is probably about 70-1 mens gear to women's. Still plenty of selection though and I do know a lot of ladies don't mind wearing some mens stuff. My wife has 3 jackets including 2 that are basically a female version of 2 of my REV'IT jackets. For helmets while they are unisex (mostly?) the colour selection is amazing as well as the styles. Plenty of choices for the discerning female motorbike rider. Another think I think we are seeing more of is training schools with courses geared towards women and the more ladies riding the better I say!
Don't tell me ... do you take training courses for a driver's license or do you continue to do so even if you already have one?
You only need to take 2 courses to get your full M in Ontario though technically you do not need to take any just pass the tests. However a lot of people choose to go through a school and it is the better way to do it IMHO. I try and take a course every summer in the advanced training classes and I know they have helped make me a better rider. I also enjoy them and the school I use has great instructors. It's alway a hard but fun weekend and I am usually absolutely exhausted by the end.
Here it doesn't work as you say, it's like for WW1 fighter aircraft pilots; theoretical and practical course.
Theoretical: many quizzes where it is important to have a good memory
Practical: some basic maneuvers driving a car, usually a small subcompact with manual transmission
That's enough.
And then ... either drink or drown ..!
So ... if you are capable and have the instinct of the driver, with years of experience (and a lot of luck) you become good and God help us!
For some years there have been driving licenses dedicated to motorcycles (and scooters) while previously it was enough to have one to drive the car; in fact many years ago (I took it) there was also a small driving license to allow the motorcycle to be driven from 16 years of age onwards (card with 10 quizzes and no practical tests).
Today also for motorbikes (and scooters) of various power there are driving licenses of different levels and with very severe practical tests.
But no updates. End of OT.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2008 MP3 500, 2013 BV350, 2020 Vespa Sei Giorni
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Posts: 8635
Location: Ashburn, Va. Home to the Internet
Fri Jan 17, 2020 6:54 am quote
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I rode a 1949 Harley-Davidson as my only transportation from 2003-2015. It has no instrumentation (no speedo, clock, fuel gauge), no turn signals, no radio, etc. Not even an electric start. Riding everyday does not create a need for these things, although some might enjoy those creature comforts. I agree 100% with Prof Rene. I love the mechanical nature of old machines. I feel much more connected to them.

-Craig
Damn 1949's are not known for there reliability as a daily rider, you must have walked a lot
Banned
2009 GTS 250, 2013 Buddy 125, 2014 Triumph Bonneville
Joined: 23 Apr 2016
Posts: 2038
Location: North Jersey
Fri Jan 17, 2020 7:33 am quote
Belk, I agree with what you say about years ago and trying to find a selection of women’s riding gear. Back then, you had to go to a Harley dealership to find women’s gear, and there were two basic choices- black pirate gear, and black with huge pink H-D logos.

Last edited by Vintage1 on Fri Jan 17, 2020 8:39 am; edited 1 time in total
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 3991
Location: Latina (Italy)
Fri Jan 17, 2020 7:59 am quote
Just what italian female motorcyclists hate ...
When i go to motorcycle rallies and hear them talk and sometimes i grab the content, the theme is always the clothing ..! It's not a stereotype, it's like that ...
(How i feel "cuddly" to talk about women's clothing ... (moan) ... )
Sorry...
Ossessionato
2010 ThunderFly 190, 2008 250 GTS
Joined: 29 Apr 2011
Posts: 2757
Location: Springboro, OH
Fri Jan 17, 2020 8:34 am quote
There seem to be fewer local clubs sponsoring rallies. I know AV will be there but here in Ohio and the surrounding region, there aren't that many that are less than 6 hours away.
Hooked
2018 Piaggio BV 350
Joined: 08 Jun 2019
Posts: 253
Location: NJ
Fri Jan 17, 2020 9:41 am quote
Vintage1 wrote:
Belk, I agree with what you say about years ago and trying to find a selection of women’s riding gear. Back then, you had to go to a Harley dealership to find women’s gear, and there were two basic choices- black pirate gear, and black with huge pink H-D logos.
Couldn't agree more, but I have to say I still see a TON of pink "flare" on black leather. I find it hard to locate even one third of the stuff out there for men, in an equitable women's fit. I don't want neon pink, I don't want leather tassles, I just want techy or leathery that fits, with padding/armor. So frustrating! Would love to know where you ladies are getting your gear! I check out RevZilla am likely to get a white leather jacket for summer.


As per OP: I can't tell you the greatest change, but the one I appreciate the most is tied between ABS brakes, and fuel-injected. I love not having to pray and set aside 39 minutes to get the thing started if it's been sitting for a week or two...
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Honda CTX 700 DN Automatic Motorcycle
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Fri Jan 17, 2020 11:02 am quote
Karlsbadd wrote:
Vintage1 wrote:
Belk, I agree with what you say about years ago and trying to find a selection of women’s riding gear. Back then, you had to go to a Harley dealership to find women’s gear, and there were two basic choices- black pirate gear, and black with huge pink H-D logos.
Couldn't agree more, but I have to say I still see a TON of pink "flare" on black leather. I find it hard to locate even one third of the stuff out there for men, in an equitable women's fit. I don't want neon pink, I don't want leather tassles, I just want techy or leathery that fits, with padding/armor. So frustrating! Would love to know where you ladies are getting your gear! I check out RevZilla am likely to get a white leather jacket for summer.
Expensive, but I have bought good quality armored jackets from

https://www.tucanourbano.com/en/
Grumpy Biker
1980 Vespa P200e (sold), 2002 Vespa ET4 (sold), 1949 Harley-Davidson FL
Joined: 27 Oct 2009
Posts: 4758
Location: Chandler, Arizona, USA
Fri Jan 17, 2020 12:30 pm quote
WEB-Tech wrote:
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I rode a 1949 Harley-Davidson as my only transportation from 2003-2015. It has no instrumentation (no speedo, clock, fuel gauge), no turn signals, no radio, etc. Not even an electric start. Riding everyday does not create a need for these things, although some might enjoy those creature comforts. I agree 100% with Prof Rene. I love the mechanical nature of old machines. I feel much more connected to them.

-Craig
Damn 1949's are not known for there reliability as a daily rider, you must have walked a lot
They don't have a great reputation. But I've found it has more to do with the skill of the mechanic than the machine. And paying attention to fix things before they break rather than after. But over 12 years of daily riding, I did have to push it a couple times.

-Craig
Member
2001 Vespa ET4 150
Joined: 18 Dec 2019
Posts: 12
Location: Florida
Fri Jan 17, 2020 12:42 pm quote
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I rode a 1949 Harley-Davidson as my only transportation from 2003-2015. It has no instrumentation (no speedo, clock, fuel gauge), no turn signals, no radio, etc. Not even an electric start. Riding everyday does not create a need for these things, although some might enjoy those creature comforts. I agree 100% with Prof Rene. I love the mechanical nature of old machines. I feel much more connected to them.

-Craig
Damn 1949's are not known for there reliability as a daily rider, you must have walked a lot
They don't have a great reputation. But I've found it has more to do with the skill of the mechanic than the machine. And paying attention to fix things before they break rather than after. But over 12 years of daily riding, I did have to push it a couple times.

-Craig
I will say my Softail has never left me stranded. I have had issues and been able to nurse it home, both were fuel system related (Blown fuel pressure regulator and a blown fuel line). Now I did get stuck on the side of the road on my Iron Head Sportster, because of driver stupidity I ran out of fuel. My wife had to ride off on her bike and bring back fuel.
Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GT (Rocket): 2005 Vespa GT (Razzo): 2006 Vespa GT (Crash): 2007 Vespa GT (Vanessa): 2009 Yamaha Zuma 125 (Zoom): 2018 Yamaha Xmax (Max),
Joined: 26 Sep 2006
Posts: 4374
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Fri Jan 17, 2020 12:50 pm quote
Back to the original post, the largest change I have seen, at least in our scooter club, is that the scooter riders are shifting to maxi scooters.

I joined that club in 2018 with the purchase of a new Yamaha Xmax.

It is only 300cc, but has a large, maxi body, so I feel much different than on one of my remaining Vespa GTs.

Bill
Grumpy Biker
1980 Vespa P200e (sold), 2002 Vespa ET4 (sold), 1949 Harley-Davidson FL
Joined: 27 Oct 2009
Posts: 4758
Location: Chandler, Arizona, USA
Fri Jan 17, 2020 1:15 pm quote
Prof Rene wrote:
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I rode a 1949 Harley-Davidson as my only transportation from 2003-2015. It has no instrumentation (no speedo, clock, fuel gauge), no turn signals, no radio, etc. Not even an electric start. Riding everyday does not create a need for these things, although some might enjoy those creature comforts. I agree 100% with Prof Rene. I love the mechanical nature of old machines. I feel much more connected to them.

-Craig
Damn 1949's are not known for there reliability as a daily rider, you must have walked a lot
They don't have a great reputation. But I've found it has more to do with the skill of the mechanic than the machine. And paying attention to fix things before they break rather than after. But over 12 years of daily riding, I did have to push it a couple times.

-Craig
I will say my Softail has never left me stranded. I have had issues and been able to nurse it home, both were fuel system related (Blown fuel pressure regulator and a blown fuel line). Now I did get stuck on the side of the road on my Iron Head Sportster, because of driver stupidity I ran out of fuel. My wife had to ride off on her bike and bring back fuel.
I did the same thing 2 weeks ago. With time off for the holidays, I miss counted how far I’d ridden since my last fill up. Luckily I was 4 miles from home. So it just took a quick phone call to my wife. That’s the first time EVER that I was stranded because I ran out of fuel. I did coast into a gas station on the boonies of New Mexico once.

-Craig
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2008 MP3 500, 2013 BV350, 2020 Vespa Sei Giorni
Joined: 13 Oct 2012
Posts: 8635
Location: Ashburn, Va. Home to the Internet
Fri Jan 17, 2020 1:47 pm quote
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I rode a 1949 Harley-Davidson as my only transportation from 2003-2015. It has no instrumentation (no speedo, clock, fuel gauge), no turn signals, no radio, etc. Not even an electric start. Riding everyday does not create a need for these things, although some might enjoy those creature comforts. I agree 100% with Prof Rene. I love the mechanical nature of old machines. I feel much more connected to them.

-Craig
Damn 1949's are not known for there reliability as a daily rider, you must have walked a lot
They don't have a great reputation. But I've found it has more to do with the skill of the mechanic than the machine. And paying attention to fix things before they break rather than after. But over 12 years of daily riding, I did have to push it a couple times.

-Craig
12 years and a couple times isn't bad
Member
2006 Vespa LX150, 2011 Honda PCX 125
Joined: 17 Aug 2019
Posts: 28
Location: Southern Utah
Fri Jan 17, 2020 1:58 pm quote
WEB-Tech wrote:
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I rode a 1949 Harley-Davidson as my only transportation from 2003-2015. It has no instrumentation (no speedo, clock, fuel gauge), no turn signals, no radio, etc. Not even an electric start. Riding everyday does not create a need for these things, although some might enjoy those creature comforts. I agree 100% with Prof Rene. I love the mechanical nature of old machines. I feel much more connected to them.

-Craig
Damn 1949's are not known for there reliability as a daily rider, you must have walked a lot
They don't have a great reputation. But I've found it has more to do with the skill of the mechanic than the machine. And paying attention to fix things before they break rather than after. But over 12 years of daily riding, I did have to push it a couple times.

-Craig
12 years and a couple times isn't bad
My “50” Hydraglide that I built was ten times more reliable than the 1980 Superglide that I bought brand new, that’s for sure.

16F31805-9459-4F3A-94D0-1B237E7A25AF.jpeg

Member
2006 Vespa LX150, 2011 Honda PCX 125
Joined: 17 Aug 2019
Posts: 28
Location: Southern Utah
Fri Jan 17, 2020 2:00 pm quote
utahusker wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
caschnd1 wrote:
WEB-Tech wrote:
Prof Rene wrote:
On a side note. I am seeing too much electronics on bikes in general. I feel riding is mechanical in nature, a you and the machine symbiosis that makes you feel like one with the world. I want gadgets I will climb in my SUV.
Ride your motorcycle as your main form of transportation and see if you change your mind.
I rode a 1949 Harley-Davidson as my only transportation from 2003-2015. It has no instrumentation (no speedo, clock, fuel gauge), no turn signals, no radio, etc. Not even an electric start. Riding everyday does not create a need for these things, although some might enjoy those creature comforts. I agree 100% with Prof Rene. I love the mechanical nature of old machines. I feel much more connected to them.

-Craig
Damn 1949's are not known for there reliability as a daily rider, you must have walked a lot
They don't have a great reputation. But I've found it has more to do with the skill of the mechanic than the machine. And paying attention to fix things before they break rather than after. But over 12 years of daily riding, I did have to push it a couple times.

-Craig
12 years and a couple times isn't bad
My “50” Hydraglide that I built was ten times more reliable than the 1980 Superglide that I bought brand new, that’s for sure.
That wasn’t my camper by the way . That was Sturgis back in the day.
Hooked
'81 P200E, '80 P200E, '64 V90 and 3 Ciaos
Joined: 27 Mar 2014
Posts: 202
Location: Tucson, AZ
Fri Jan 17, 2020 2:37 pm quote
caschnd1 wrote:
They don't have a great reputation. But I've found it has more to do with the skill of the mechanic than the machine. And paying attention to fix things before they break rather than after. But over 12 years of daily riding, I did have to push it a couple times.

-Craig
It's a labor of love man. Most of the time, the machine moves you. Sometimes, it's our turn to move the machine.

The mopeds aren't bad: it beats pedaling. Scooters are slightly more involved. Pushing vans is more of a commitment, especially when overpass offramps are involved...
Hooked
'81 P200E, '80 P200E, '64 V90 and 3 Ciaos
Joined: 27 Mar 2014
Posts: 202
Location: Tucson, AZ
Fri Jan 17, 2020 2:56 pm quote
Back on topic...

1) I third (?) the proliferation of EFI scooters. Carbureted bikes are getting rare. Aside from handling cold starts better, better operation at varying altitude and improved fuel efficiency was a big up. Just remember, it's not foolproof. Don't run your tank run dry if possibly, replacing fuel pumps makes carburetor repair seem cheap.

2) The introduction of catalyzed exhausts. Helps with tailpipe emissions. Not a bad thing, but it did add some machine weight to the muffler.

3) The phasing out of the kickstarter. The number of scooters with kickstarters seems to be inversely proportional to the number of scooters with EFI. Even the 50cc machines are losing them. While it speaks volumes about manufacturer's confidence in their starters and electrical systems, it does take away a "Plan B" for riders with weak batteries.

4) Web-enabled scooters. This is a new thing and more specific to electric scooters, but Piaggio and Kymco have added smart dashes with phone connectivity. The convenience sound great, buy the level of distraction is could bring will require more rider discipline.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I can't speak on fashions, I'm more serious about my scoots mechanical condition than I am about what I don to ride.

Like some of the other grumpy riders here, I only want information that relates to the status of my machine and the environment I'm operating in. Anything else is just noise. I have tech, but it's off for the ride. After all, would anyone be on YouTube or Facebook while paying for a therapist session?
Hooked
2020 Yamaha XMax, 2013 Vespa GTS300 Super, 2003 Stella, 1980 Vespa P200E
Joined: 15 Jun 2011
Posts: 288
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Fri Jan 17, 2020 6:15 pm quote
When I joined 7 Bridges Scooter Club of Jacksonville, Fla. in 2004, it was a rag-tag bunch that consisted of a handful of vintage scooter riders. It was barely a club and it didn't even have a real name. Rode to dinner once a week with occasional wrenching sessions.

Fast forward 15 years later. 70+ members and 95% of the scoots are modern or maxi. The third most popular bike in the club is a motorcycle. The club rides 10 times a month now, takes week long trips every year and has its own version of a rally.

If we had stuck to our roots and stayed with only vintage, there would be no club today. You either change or you die.

The riding and the associated comraderie is why we do it. What you ride really is incidental in the big picture,
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