Vespas with added ABS - have you ever used it??
Post Reply    Forum -> General Discussion
Author Message
Addicted
'2017 GTS 300 SS
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 565
Location: Bicton - Western Australia
Wed Feb 12, 2020 12:56 am quote
Hi all
Just wondering if anyone has had to use the ABS braking on their Vespa?
Did it do the job as intended?
What did it feel like if used?
Was there anything to be aware of?
Thanks in advance for advice and reading this.
Cheers
Paul
Hooked
2017 Piaggio BV350
Joined: 21 Jun 2016
Posts: 227
Location: Irving, TX
Wed Feb 12, 2020 5:48 am quote
Yes, ABS has kicked in once. A car pulled out in front of me, and I had to brake hard to keep from running into him. I felt the ABS working. I'm assuming had I not had it, I'd have slid into him.

Yes, it did its job.

Just like with a car, there's a pulsing of the brakes. It felt kinda bumpy, almost like riding across a washboard-like surface.

Only thing to be aware of is to not let up. Keep the levers pulled tight, and let the system do its job.
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Moto Guzzi Airone 250 Sport 1951
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 2555
Location: Latina (Italy)
Wed Feb 12, 2020 6:24 am quote
... and also pray ...
Hooked
GTS 300
Joined: 03 Jul 2019
Posts: 227
Location: lewisville , nc. 27023
Wed Feb 12, 2020 7:04 am quote
After I had the brake recall on my 2020 GTS 300 , I purposely tested them myself.

It works just like in your car, some minor pulsation in the levers . I think it is important to understand the feeling , so if you ever REALLY need to engage it.
You might just save some skin and gear damage.

( maybe a little skid mark in your underwear )
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Modded Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 6241
Location: Downtown Toronto
Wed Feb 12, 2020 7:32 am quote
Yes, on more than a few occasions and they work as advertised. Just grab a handful and let the system do its job. I took a course where they had us going in WOT and hitting a braking box of about 5 feet. The instructors were really impressed with the Vespa ABS and they kept having me going back further to pick up more speed. I was definitely hitting the box at freeway speeds and was able to stay in it.
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Moto Guzzi Airone 250 Sport 1951
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 2555
Location: Latina (Italy)
Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:32 am quote
Yes, but always good tires and an eye on the asphalt, ABS helps but it is also the driver who evaluates everything.
Five years ago a dog crossed the road (I was with the X Max 250 ABS) and the ABS saved me (me and also the dog) but it took cold blood to continue holding the brake levers (front and rear) and especially to counteract the lateral skidding which was attempting due to the uneven asphalt.
With the Tricity 155 i made a test and it is easier but also more difficult with the UBS (combined braking), you cannot modulate the front and rear braking; in some cases it is better and in others (slippery asphalt) dangerous (heavier and less responsive front forks), it would take the ASR but only Tricity 300 and MP3 offer it.

Last edited by Attila on Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:42 am; edited 1 time in total
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Modded Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 6241
Location: Downtown Toronto
Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:40 am quote
Attila wrote:
Yes, but always good tires and an eye on the asphalt, ABS helps but it is also the driver who evaluates everything.
Five years ago a dog crossed the road (I was with the X Max 250 ABS) and the ABS saved me (me and also the dog) but it took cold blood to continue holding the brake levers (front and rear) and especially to counteract the lateral skidding which was attempting due to the uneven asphalt.
Yes, you HAVE to trust the system to do the job it was made for. I have 2 bikes with ABS and one without and I have to brake differently. You get used to it especially if the one without has a clutch. Muscle memory is a powerful thing and I find it easier to adjust if the ride without has a foot brake as that and the clutch puts you in a different mindset.
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Moto Guzzi Airone 250 Sport 1951
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 2555
Location: Latina (Italy)
Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:51 am quote
Harbinger wrote:
Attila wrote:
Yes, but always good tires and an eye on the asphalt, ABS helps but it is also the driver who evaluates everything.
Five years ago a dog crossed the road (I was with the X Max 250 ABS) and the ABS saved me (me and also the dog) but it took cold blood to continue holding the brake levers (front and rear) and especially to counteract the lateral skidding which was attempting due to the uneven asphalt.
Yes, you HAVE to trust the system to do the job it was made for. I have 2 bikes with ABS and one without and I have to brake differently. You get used to it especially if the one without has a clutch. Muscle memory is a powerful thing and I find it easier to adjust if the ride without has a foot brake as that and the clutch puts you in a different mindset.
Attentive friend, the Vespa (which i sometimes drive because the dealer friend lends it to me for Vespa club gatherings only, i advertise to him ) has a lot of weight moved behind (center of gravity 2/3 - 1/3) and also with ABS pulls the ass to the side ( right or left), the arrival of the ASR also on some models has little changed things for the better.
Hooked
2018 GTS 300. Montebianco
Joined: 31 Jul 2007
Posts: 204
Location: Vancouver, BC Canada
Wed Feb 12, 2020 9:05 am quote
Paul,

My 2018 GTS has ABS and I've felt it activate a few times when I've braked on wet roads. The ABS is hard to miss; it makes things feel 'bumpy' as another said. Jerking pulses of the brakes. If the road is smooth at all, you will be aware of it. ABS in a car is more subtle, and apparently also on the 2020 GTS.

Try it by braking hard, with the rear brake, in a straight line. If you can't feel it, get someone to watch you try it or have it checked.

Last edited by Fencing Fan on Sat Feb 15, 2020 5:15 pm; edited 1 time in total
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Moto Guzzi Airone 250 Sport 1951
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 2555
Location: Latina (Italy)
Wed Feb 12, 2020 9:12 am quote
A recommendation, keep the sensor on the tone wheel clean.
Addicted
'2017 GTS 300 SS
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 565
Location: Bicton - Western Australia
Wed Feb 12, 2020 1:23 pm quote
thanks all for the replies and Details. Very informative
Cheers
Paul
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Neutrino MP3 492.7 AK, 2013 Moto Guzzi Norge
Joined: 29 Mar 2008
Posts: 21459
Location: Harriman, Tennessee, Tn
Thu Feb 13, 2020 6:32 am quote
paul blknblu wrote:
thanks all for the replies and Details. Very informative
Cheers
Paul
find a clear dry parking lot and do some testing, this way you will know what it feels if you ever encounter it in a situation.

alot of folks freak out when ABS kicks in and release the brakes which is total wrong thing to do. you need to keep the brakes applied till the situation is in total control or your completely stopped.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Modded Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 6241
Location: Downtown Toronto
Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:24 am quote
old as dirt wrote:
paul blknblu wrote:
thanks all for the replies and Details. Very informative
Cheers
Paul
find a clear dry parking lot and do some testing, this way you will know what it feels if you ever encounter it in a situation.

alot of folks freak out when ABS kicks in and release the brakes which is total wrong thing to do. you need to keep the brakes applied till the situation is in total control or your completely stopped.
Well put and exactly the way to do it. My recent bike is a beast to ride and has no abs and that is the same method I used to learn how to emergency brake it. I swear that is what went a long way to saving my ass from a pretty serious accident a few months ago. I practiced hard braking, emergency down shifting and swerving over and over again in a huge parking lot.
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Moto Guzzi Airone 250 Sport 1951
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 2555
Location: Latina (Italy)
Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:45 am quote
Harbinger wrote:
I practiced hard braking, emergency down shifting and swerving over and over again in a huge parking lot.
... if someone saw you he thought you were crazy ...
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Modded Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 6241
Location: Downtown Toronto
Thu Feb 13, 2020 10:31 am quote
Attila wrote:
Harbinger wrote:
I practiced hard braking, emergency down shifting and swerving over and over again in a huge parking lot.
... if someone saw you he thought you were crazy ...
Maybe but it is a huge parking lot. Exhibition place is about a 5 minute ride from my place and when there is no event is very empty. One of the riding schools in Toronto actually does their licensing courses in one of the ancillary parking lots, that's how big the parking is.

https://www.explace.on.ca
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2008 MP3 500, 2013 BV350, 2020 Vespa Sei Giorni
Joined: 13 Oct 2012
Posts: 7915
Location: Ashburn, Va. Home to the Internet
Thu Feb 13, 2020 1:27 pm quote
Sounds like a great place to practice flying the side car
Hooked
2020 GTS HPE 300, 2013 GTS 300ie
Joined: 23 Nov 2019
Posts: 124
Location: San Diego
Thu Feb 13, 2020 8:05 pm quote
Yep. Was a good distance behind a car, then another vehicle decided everyone was going to slow and created a second lane using the wide lane and the bike lane then jammed in front of the guy in front of me when the road suddenly narrowed. That car had to slam on the brakes, then I did. If the car in front had hit the other guy, I would have been happy to be a police and insurance witness. Yep, going 10+ over the speed limit is apparently too slow for that a-hole
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Modded Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 6241
Location: Downtown Toronto
Fri Feb 14, 2020 2:36 am quote
WEB-Tech wrote:
Sounds like a great place to practice flying the side car
I know! I have gotten it up in the air on purpose there a few times . I've also flown the chair a few times not so much on purpose a few times which is maybe a little less fun! Actually it's not that scary as long as you know how to just roll off the throttle and let it drop back down. I have a lot of time on the rig now and am more comfortable with it and this spring I'll hit the lot and see if I can master getting the chair up.

A few people here think maybe I talk about it too much but that's fine. I can't recommend the newer Ural models enough for urbanites that do not have room for a car but can fit in a rig. It really is almost as handy as a cage when it comes to carrying capacity (sidecar is huge) and the weather is no problem provided you have the gear including snow and I mean lots of snow. The experience of riding a motorcycle down a big city street in a snowstorm is hard to explain. In Toronto the other big benefit is motorcycle parking is free and that includes the time restriction on spots. I literally save at least $200-$300/month on parking fees.
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Moto Guzzi Airone 250 Sport 1951
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 2555
Location: Latina (Italy)
Fri Feb 14, 2020 2:49 am quote
Harbinger wrote:
A few people here think maybe I talk about it too much but that's fine.
It doesn't matter to me that you talk too much about it, better ... better!
We are also here to listen to all the experiences but all of them, at least me ...
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2400
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Sat Feb 15, 2020 8:36 pm quote
Since I ride year-round here in Northeastville, ABS and traction control have come on very handy on a few occasions, including today, on a near-80-mile round trip to try and buy a pair of motorcycle boots: temps didn't crack 30F all day, and several stretches of highway had a few "surprise" patches of ice. (Note: it's not the bridges you have to worry about, it's the underpasses. Trust me on this.) This tech is by no means a substitute for learning how to deal with situations like this on your own, but I wouldn't want to be without it.
Rallies Europe 2016   Vespa Wasp Pin Badges   Scooter Parts Company
Post Reply    Forum -> General Discussion
[ Time: 0.3315s ][ Queries: 23 (0.0540s) ][ Debug on ]