Analog to Digital Turn Signal Flasher Output
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2007 Stella 150
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 549
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Sat Mar 14, 2020 3:00 pm quote
I set my iphone 29Ē from my right rear turn signal mounted in a vice with the back or camera side inline in height and straight back from the bulb, lens was still installed. I didnít move anything between testing, all I did was reset measurements by touching the screen. Didnít want to change any parameters between changing out flashers. Visually the bulb is brighter and seemed to fill out the entire reflector, looked less like a flashing filament.

Room lux was 06 in my dark garage with tail light covered.

Peak or max LUX was 27 when flashing with the analog flasher. Average plateaued about 21 lux.

Peak or max lux was 143 when flashing with the digital flasher. Average plateaued about 118 lux.

At 5.29 times the output, If Iím understanding lux correctly, that should appear a little more than twice as bright to the human eye all other things being equal. Iím sure someone with more experience will be along to help explain it, or tell me how messed up my thinking is 🙃.
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74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
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Location: Victoria, Australia
Sun Mar 15, 2020 3:11 am quote
So an analogue flasher has points and digital is solid state, is that correct? What's an example of a digital flasher?

An interesting comparison might be the bulb lit with no flasher, just a straight connection, that should be the brightest, right?
Addicted
2007 Stella 150
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 549
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Sun Mar 15, 2020 5:59 am quote
Ginch wrote:
So an analogue flasher has points and digital is solid state, is that correct? What's an example of a digital flasher?

An interesting comparison might be the bulb lit with no flasher, just a straight connection, that should be the brightest, right?
You are correct about points vs solid state, the old bimetallic used a small heater to create the flashing. My Stella appears to like a modern solid state flasher better. Thinking it has something to do with our weak outdated electrical system.

This is what I purchased, it was simple plug and play on my scooter. It's LED compatible and can handle up to 10 amps. My 7507 turn signal bulbs draw a little less than 2 amps so that isn't an issue. The flasher also alternates front and rear so only one is on at a time.

https://www.amazon.com/2-Pin-Flashing-Electronic-Flasher-Signal/dp/B075FBQM33

They can also be purchased at an automotive parts store.

I'm not sure a straight connection would visibly be any brighter. Using my phone as a lux meter it picked up maximum or peak output. The average number would go up because the bulb isn't flashing and is a constant on.
Ossessionato
Joined: 26 Oct 2015
Posts: 2461

Sun Mar 15, 2020 7:37 am quote
What about during the daylight time?...and instead of 29" away, how bright does it look 29' away? I'm running electronic flashers in a few different PX's, but that's because i'm using LED turn signals.
Addicted
2007 Stella 150
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 549
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Sun Mar 15, 2020 8:59 am quote
whodatschrome wrote:
What about during the daylight time?...and instead of 29" away, how bright does it look 29' away? I'm running electronic flashers in a few different PX's, but that's because i'm using LED turn signals.
Itís just a more efficient on off switch, wouldnít expect the bulb characteristics to have changed. Just more voltage to the bulb, with a reduced load in series from a more efficient on off switch. The result is a brighter bulb with a higher output, for $10.00 I donít think a person is out anything. The dash indicator is brighter also.
Addicted
2007 Stella 150
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 549
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:04 am quote
I had a chance to do some comparing for anyone interested. The original mechanical or analog flasher dropped / consumed / used 2.63 volts DC out of a possible 13.5 vdc my power supply was set too. So 13.5 - 2.63 = 10.87 volts to The bulb.


The digital or solid state flasher dropped ~0.4 volts DC, measured 13.1 volts at the bulb. That explains why the output from the bulb looks to much brighter.
My math on a whiteboard at work without rounding and using measurements was a 18% increase. Hooking the bulb up to the variable power supply and changing between 11vdc and 13.5 vdc you can see the difference.
Ossessionato
Joined: 26 Oct 2015
Posts: 2461

Sun Mar 22, 2020 10:48 am quote
Christopher_55934 wrote:
I had a chance to do some comparing for anyone interested. The original mechanical or analog flasher dropped / consumed / used 2.63 volts DC out of a possible 13.5 vdc my power supply was set too. So 13.5 - 2.63 = 10.87 volts to The bulb.


The digital or solid state flasher dropped ~0.4 volts DC, measured 13.1 volts at the bulb. That explains why the output from the bulb looks to much brighter.
My math on a whiteboard at work without rounding and using measurements was a 18% increase. Hooking the bulb up to the variable power supply and changing between 11vdc and 13.5 vdc you can see the difference.
Very enlightening Christopher. It's always better to have brighter turn signals and a more efficient electrical system. Thank you for posting that up!
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