Riding Into The Wind
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Enthusiast
2020 GTS 300 Super
Joined: 28 May 2020
Posts: 73
Location: Teh REAL Northern California
Mon Jun 29, 2020 1:22 am quote
This was a new experience for me. Being a noob on a Vespa means that almost everything is new, but in my vast 3 weeks of Vespa ownership, today was the first time I rode when it was windy out. And that might be an understatement - the wind was blowin' pretty hard today.

Just when I was starting to get more comfortable in curves, along comes a day like today with sporadic, blustery wind. The heat was too much for me to go out a couple days in the last 3 or 4, so I didn't want to miss out on a rather cool one. I saw the trees swaying, but didn't give it much thought. This day I thought I would push myself a little on a faster road than I've been accustomed to. Speed limit was 55, but lots of curves and caution signs that recommended 40 & 45 and a few 30s. The wind turned the tables on me though. I didn't know it would affect my riding that much - and each stretch of road was different.

But I made it. It was even the longest time I've spent on a ride. It was a workout fighting the wind sometimes. I pulled over very early in and cranked my oxygen flow up to 3 LPM from 2, which meant stopping sooner to change tanks. I was happy to get home. I'm hoping it'll be another cool day tomorrow so I can go out again. And it won't bother me if it's windy again.

Jim
Ossessionato
2016 Vespa GTS300ie abs/asr/ess Settantesimo '70'
Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 2787
Location: East Anglia, The power house of the UK
Mon Jun 29, 2020 2:13 am quote
Well done Jim. It can cause a bit of apprehension if you are not used to high winds on the Vespa at first. But the Vespa will handle the winds ok once you are confident. You do get used to it and you will be fine. Just be vigilant while in the learning curve and keep the speed down a bit until you are feeling confident. Be prepared for gaps in the trees, bushes and fencing by the side of the road where a side wind can suddenly hit you.

I come from riding heavy motorcycles and heavy maxi scooters. All of those were affected by wind but not quite so much as the GTS bikes because they all weighed in at over a quarter of a ton with me on. Unlike the Vespa which is a much more pleasing and useful lightweight. That said, once you are fully ok with the wind there is nothing to stop you riding. It's only the most very very high wind days that you need to keep her in the garage. Enjoy!
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Kitted Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 7046
Location: Downtown Toronto
Mon Jun 29, 2020 2:50 am quote
Like learning how to handle a curve riding in the wind can also be a learnt skill. OK not as easy to practise unless you happen to have a parking lot near you that constantly gets high winds....

Yes, the lighter Vespa can be challenging in the wind, especially with a skirt on the bike. It is absolutely manageable though even in pretty strong winds and comes down to the riders skill level. Same goes for dealing with large trucks on the freeway, always a newer riders nemesis.

Good on you for fighting through it and it will get easier. Glad you are smart about always having enough oxygen with you. I'm sure you will continue to improve. So we've had curves and wind, now I guess we are waiting for you to be out in a heavy rain
Ossessionato
'15 Blue GTS300 Super, '18 White GTS300 Super
Joined: 01 Nov 2005
Posts: 2704
Location: Sydney, Australia
Mon Jun 29, 2020 3:52 am quote
You should try riding around the Cape Peninsula when the Cape Doctor is blowing. I remember coming around a bend on De Waal drive around the bottom of Table Mountain, and just about coming to a dead stop as I encountered that head wind.

Driving through the city I was vertical along each block, then leaning at 45 degrees through the intersections.

Mike
Ossessionato
2016 Vespa GTS300ie abs/asr/ess Settantesimo '70'
Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 2787
Location: East Anglia, The power house of the UK
Mon Jun 29, 2020 5:37 am quote
Harbinger wrote:
Like learning how to handle a curve riding in the wind can also be a learnt skill. OK not as easy to practise unless you happen to have a parking lot near you that constantly gets high winds....

Yes, the lighter Vespa can be challenging in the wind, especially with a skirt on the bike
You wear a 'skirt' on the bike!! Do you wear that off the bike too... To be honest, I tend to stick to pants. Lol
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Kitted Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2017 C650GT, Ural 2019 Gear Up
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Posts: 7046
Location: Downtown Toronto
Mon Jun 29, 2020 5:40 am quote
Stromrider wrote:
Harbinger wrote:
Like learning how to handle a curve riding in the wind can also be a learnt skill. OK not as easy to practise unless you happen to have a parking lot near you that constantly gets high winds....

Yes, the lighter Vespa can be challenging in the wind, especially with a skirt on the bike
You wear a 'skirt' on the bike!! Do you wear that off the bike too... To be honest, I tend to stick to pants. Lol
Pfft :-p

You’ve been around long enough to know what a scooter “skirt” is
Hooked
PX 150
Joined: 06 Aug 2007
Posts: 341
Location: Dublin, Ohio
Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:25 am quote
Jim,

You shared that you are new to Vespas, but do you have much two wheeled riding experience? If not, look up motorcycle countersteering. At any significant speed, your scooter will turn in the opposite direction you turn your handlebar. Stated another way, if you want to go left, push your left handgrip forward. Learning this will allow you actively and positively to steer your scooter and is a simple but essential thing to know when in a corner, especially if being affected by wind. Plus, if you think you are running wide in a corner or crossing over the line into oncoming traffic, just a slight push will steer you to safety. Also, on dry roads trust your tires. You can almost always steer out of trouble without overtaxing your tire grip. Sorry if this is all old news.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2007 LX150 2015 GTS 2013 BV 350
Joined: 13 Sep 2012
Posts: 9186
Location: Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:39 am quote
Harbinger wrote:
Pfft :-p

You’ve been around long enough to know what a scooter “skirt” is
We need a pfft emoticon! It would come in handy around here.
Molto Verboso
Primavera ET3 & PX150 & GTS 300
Joined: 05 Apr 2009
Posts: 1456
Location: Berlin
Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:46 am quote
I'm impressed that you're riding with an oxygen tank. Where do you keep it? I guess hanging from the bag hook would be best.
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 3557
Location: Latina (Italy)
Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:50 am quote
Harbinger wrote:
You’ve been around long enough to know what a scooter “skirt” is
What is a scooter skirt? If you intend the leg cover, with the wind you could also take off without the permission of the control tower.

Last edited by Attila on Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:53 am; edited 1 time in total
Hooked
2003 Vespa ET2
Joined: 05 Apr 2019
Posts: 276
Location: Cambridge, MA
Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:51 am quote
wind can be really frightening the 1st few times you feel gusts...

one thing i have found is to not fight it and not try to overcorrect...i try to be loose and relaxed and let the bike settle back on its own after a gust...i try to not grip the bars tightly as this will increase the feedback from the wind gusts...

just take it easy and you will be able to adjust....i try not to go too fast in turns on windy days..sometimes hte wind can move you off your line a little...
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 3557
Location: Latina (Italy)
Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:55 am quote
... sometimes a gust of wind can throw you off the road, sometimes in the other lane while another vehicle arrives ...
I'd be more careful.
Addicted
Bashan 150, CF Moto Fashion 250
Joined: 07 Dec 2008
Posts: 838
Location: Hyde Park, New York
Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:23 am quote
I don't think it matters how much experience you have. Handling a side gust on a scooter is always challenging. The wind is rarely steady and adjusting to a side gust changing speeds is no fun. Last year I rode across a former railroad crossing two hundred and eighty-four feet above the Hudson River. I didn't feel a thing until I cleared the trees I then spent the next mile and a half counter steering against a wind that had the US flag in the center of the crossing standing straight out.

I've dealt with gusts from passing trucks on the interstate but they weren't as cruel as a Mother Nature blast.
Ossessionato
2010 ThunderFly 190, 2008 250 GTS
Joined: 29 Apr 2011
Posts: 2710
Location: Springboro, OH
Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:27 am quote
Crosswinds can be tricky, and the effects are amplified if you have a windscreen.

Keep your wits about you (looking at the trees is a good idea) and don't panic if you get blown about a little. Adjust you lane position as needed to help compensate for the wind, to keep from getting blown off the road or over the centerline.

I recall riding for several hours due north on route 49 near the Ohio/Indiana border one blustery day on a 4 day trip. Open farmland meant no wind break at all; they even shutoff most of the windmills that day with wind gusts up to 45 MPH and tractor trailers coming the other way on a 2 lane road. Had to replace the rubber bushings on my windscreen after that trip.
Enthusiast
2020 GTS 300 Super
Joined: 28 May 2020
Posts: 73
Location: Teh REAL Northern California
Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:29 am quote
Stromrider wrote:
Just be vigilant while in the learning curve and keep the speed down a bit until you are feeling confident. Be prepared for gaps in the trees, bushes and fencing by the side of the road where a side wind can suddenly hit you.
Yeah, I noticed the wind kinda sneaks up on ya. It caught me off-guard, but I adapted okay.
Harbinger wrote:
...can be challenging in the wind, especially with a skirt on the bike.
Still new enough I don't know what you mean by skirt, unless you are referring to the rear bodywork that covers most of the drivetrain.
Quote:
Glad you are smart about always having enough oxygen with you. I'm sure you will continue to improve. So we've had curves and wind, now I guess we are waiting for you to be out in a heavy rain
Even though the "pet carrier" can hold 3 spare tanks, I've only been taking one spare with me until I start spending more time out. I'm hoping that will be soon after I get the "camera bag" I ordered and will be stopping to make photos occasionally. Don't hold your breath on the rainy ride though. I'm not too interested in trying that anytime soon.
apex wrote:
You shared that you are new to Vespas, but do you have much two wheeled riding experience? If not, look up motorcycle countersteering.
Back in the 1980s I had a sportbike for a few years, all of it unlicensed and untrained and sadly, always high on something. I don't have many detailed memories of most of those days on the bike. The most vivid one is after I quit drinking and doing drugs, but still stinkin' thinkin', I took a curve at a high rate of speed and hit a patch of sand. I didn't go down, but that was the last time I rode before I got this Vespa about 35 years later. I have signed up for a California Motorcycle Safety Course (taken the classroom sections, but waiting for the riding part when they open the training area) and have been watching a select few Youtube channels to learn and practice what they teach. I remembered countersteering, but I'm just not good at it yet. I'm workin' on it though and getting a little better each time I go out.
Der Blechfahrer wrote:
I'm impressed that you're riding with an oxygen tank. Where do you keep it? I guess hanging from the bag hook would be best.
I carry a tank in a CamelBak hydration backpack that I removed the water bladder from. At the flow rates I normally use, a tank will last between 40 and 60 minutes, give or take. I can carry up to 3 spares under the seat, which would allow me to go out to shoot photos for 3 or 4 hours. That's a good day for me - even in my Jeep I won't stay out that long making photos.







Hooked
GTS 300, Malaguti 150
Joined: 19 Nov 2018
Posts: 257
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:54 am quote
it gets pretty hot in the pet carrier. I think your air will heat up.
Thought, I've seen air ex changers that take the oxygen out of air. Would one work at 12V DC?

I've had wind cause me to drive with one knee out to counterbalance
Enthusiast
2020 GTS 300 Super
Joined: 28 May 2020
Posts: 73
Location: Teh REAL Northern California
Mon Jun 29, 2020 1:00 pm quote
RP Tech wrote:
it gets pretty hot in the pet carrier. I think your air will heat up.
The tanks are aluminum, which is a heatsink. The air in a tank would have to get pretty warm to feel it in my nose - a lot warmer than 98.6°. I keep lots of tanks in my Jeep and we all have heard stories about how hot the inside of a vehicle gets in parking lots. I have never felt "hot air" enter my lungs. Hot air, of course, I'm full of sometimes.
Quote:
Thought, I've seen air ex changers that take the oxygen out of air. Would one work at 12V DC?
I use one of those when I'm home - electric operated and a 25' hose lets me go anywhere in my apartment and the shop area/patio in front of my place. But it's a pretty big unit. Smaller, portable concentrators can be used in automobiles, but aren't meant to be exposed to the elements and shouldn't even be left in a car on a hot day. Another drawback is that many of them don't do continuous flow, like I need. They do pulse-flow, which means they only pump o2 when you inhale, but there's very short delay for the sensor to notice and that delay for those of us on continuous flow is a big problem. Those models that do continuous flow are too big for a scooter, especially when you need to use tanks when you're off the scooter to run into the store or go into a restaurant to eat. I have to be on oxygen 24/7. I can be off it for a minute or two, like when I want to go get the mail out of my box on the street, but that is noticeably taxing and I'm unable to even chat with a neighbor until I get connected again.

I cope and I find ways. O2 is definitely restricting and the girls don't flirt with me anymore, but I have a very good life. My lung problems are my own fault and it's a heavy price to pay for the way I used to live. I don't want pity or sympathy, but I do share about it because I know I'm not the only one with health challenges that can be overcome. I'm trying to set a good example.
Hooked
2018 Piaggio BV 350
Joined: 08 Jun 2019
Posts: 217
Location: NJ
Mon Jun 29, 2020 1:05 pm quote
Jim
The first week I had my scooter, I laid it down (weight and bike got away from me taking it off the center stand), got backed into, and went on a ride with winds strong enough to move my lane position. The last two took place within half an hour of each other. The wind moving me around on the bike was an unnerving feeling. I consider myself a newer rider. Fast forward a year later, I now sail over the GWB (headwinds be damned!), and have ridden that same route where the wind moved me within the lane. The thing I remind myself of is 1. To relax when I feel the shoulders get tight and my grip in super death mode on the handlebars. 2. Breathe. 3. Remind myself that I’ll get more comfortable and every new experience will come with some fear. I only just started taking the bike out on the local highway recently and it’s a practice makes you better thing. I think you’re going about it all the right ways. I also think the more you know your bike (maybe go out riding, just straight riding for 2, 3 hours if you can), the more you know what she’ll do, and won’t. Good to know everyone’s limits.
Ossessionato
Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956 - Yamaha Majesty 250 DX 1998
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 3557
Location: Latina (Italy)
Mon Jun 29, 2020 1:20 pm quote
Ah no ... it is important to have and give opinions on personal experiences, help us and help others ...
Regarding the problem of the transport of oxygen I just say to be careful because the luggage box of the Vespa is above the engine and in some cases it is very hot.
Hooked
2009 Vespa GTS300 S
Joined: 28 Nov 2017
Posts: 204
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
Mon Jun 29, 2020 1:41 pm quote
Jim, you're a legend. I think you must be the only Vesparatti on oxygen, a turbo charged rider for sure. Go you.

Here on the south island of New Zealand we have the "pesterly easterly" wind as we are in the roaring 40's latitude. Gusty by itself and more so between the big hedges of farm paddocks. Then throw in the blast of big truck passing in the mix. The wind seems to be always about 9-10 o'clock or 2-3 o'clock as far as direction goes. A real challenging annoyance.The best is to relax and not to react to quickly as one inevitably over react to worsen the situation. Most times just keep the constant pressure on the handlebars from before the situation and the scoot will settle back on it's course. It helps to to keep the ride smooth without wobbles. Normally is you are blown off course it is a more gradual event which you then correct when things are settled. Hope I explained it ok.

Enjoy your rides and hey!...share some of those photos. Always enjoyable to see other's creative work.

keep the shiny side up and the dark side down...ride safe.
Enthusiast
2020 GTS 300 Super
Joined: 28 May 2020
Posts: 73
Location: Teh REAL Northern California
Mon Jun 29, 2020 2:34 pm quote
NZscoot wrote:
Jim, you're a legend. I think you must be the only Vesparatti on oxygen, a turbo charged rider for sure. Go you.
Thank you for that. Not so sure I deserve it, but thank you anyway.
Quote:
Hope I explained it ok.
Sure you did. The accent throws me a bit and I don't know how you manage to type while standing upside down, but I have a friend in NZ who says it's easy (although he does argue that it's me the one who has an accent).
Quote:
Enjoy your rides and hey!...share some of those photos. Always enjoyable to see other's creative work.

keep the shiny side up and the dark side down...ride safe.
Absolutely, to all of that.
Molto Verboso
2018 LIBERTY 150S, 2013 Kymco LIKE200iLX
Joined: 26 Jul 2013
Posts: 1148
Location: Ohio
Mon Jun 29, 2020 3:08 pm quote
Wind riding through trees....
Slow down and watch for fallen branches.
Witnessed a motorcycle rider laying in the road, and his bike still steaming where a rural mailbox used to reside.
3 foot by 2" dead branch dismounted him.

I certainly don't consider a 300Vespa to be a light ride...but a branch that size would upset it, too.
Very few get into trouble without speed being involved, and it also causes most single vehicle accidents.
O.S.
Molto Verboso
Medley 150
Joined: 02 Jul 2016
Posts: 1569
Location: Adelaide
Mon Jun 29, 2020 3:24 pm quote
There's a few places around the state that have a wind sock placed in areas of potentially high wind usually between hills where there could be a 'draught' across the road. They are visible well in advance of a sudden rush of wind.
I think these are mainly for caravans that are lightweight and could get blown over. Keep your eyes out for a wind sock and take appropriate action if its horizontal.

index.jpg

Molto Verboso
Medley 150
Joined: 02 Jul 2016
Posts: 1569
Location: Adelaide
Mon Jun 29, 2020 3:58 pm quote
However there is some wind you want to avoid riding into.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPIP9KXdmO0
Enthusiast
2020 GTS 300 Super
Joined: 28 May 2020
Posts: 73
Location: Teh REAL Northern California
Mon Jun 29, 2020 4:38 pm quote
Sledge wrote:
Keep your eyes out for a wind sock and take appropriate action if its horizontal.
I don't know about all of California, but they don't have windsocks anywhere I've been in the Sierra Nevadas. It would be a good idea though. We do have lots of tall, skinny trees that sway in the slightest breeze. And when there ain't, there's other telltale signs.

Sledge wrote:
However there is some wind you want to avoid riding into.
I hear ya. Truth is, where I live, skunks are roadkill a lot. My first time out on the Vespa I had to ride by a dead skunk in the other lane and I could smell it long before I got to it. Ya get used to it when you live around here. Sometimes they don't smell.
Ossessionato
2016 Vespa GTS300ie abs/asr/ess Settantesimo '70'
Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 2787
Location: East Anglia, The power house of the UK
Wed Jul 01, 2020 3:28 am quote
Harbinger wrote:
Stromrider wrote:
Harbinger wrote:
Like learning how to handle a curve riding in the wind can also be a learnt skill. OK not as easy to practise unless you happen to have a parking lot near you that constantly gets high winds....

Yes, the lighter Vespa can be challenging in the wind, especially with a skirt on the bike
You wear a 'skirt' on the bike!! Do you wear that off the bike too... To be honest, I tend to stick to pants. Lol
Pfft :-p

You’ve been around long enough to know what a scooter “skirt” is
Yeah...only kidding!
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2008 MP3 500, 2013 BV350, 2020 Vespa Sei Giorni
Joined: 13 Oct 2012
Posts: 8514
Location: Ashburn, Va. Home to the Internet
Wed Jul 01, 2020 9:17 am quote
kz1000ST wrote:
I don't think it matters how much experience you have. Handling a side gust on a scooter is always challenging. The wind is rarely steady and adjusting to a side gust changing speeds is no fun. Last year I rode across a former railroad crossing two hundred and eighty-four feet above the Hudson River. I didn't feel a thing until I cleared the trees I then spent the next mile and a half counter steering against a wind that had the US flag in the center of the crossing standing straight out.

I've dealt with gusts from passing trucks on the interstate but they weren't as cruel as a Mother Nature blast.
Ok, where was this and is it a special event or open to the public. I like RR trestles. I've ridden across some very sketchy ones in my ATVing days.
Addicted
Bashan 150, CF Moto Fashion 250
Joined: 07 Dec 2008
Posts: 838
Location: Hyde Park, New York
Wed Jul 01, 2020 10:11 am quote
WEB-Tech wrote:
kz1000ST wrote:
I don't think it matters how much experience you have. Handling a side gust on a scooter is always challenging. The wind is rarely steady and adjusting to a side gust changing speeds is no fun. Last year I rode across a former railroad crossing two hundred and eighty-four feet above the Hudson River. I didn't feel a thing until I cleared the trees I then spent the next mile and a half counter steering against a wind that had the US flag in the center of the crossing standing straight out.

I've dealt with gusts from passing trucks on the interstate but they weren't as cruel as a Mother Nature blast.
Ok, where was this and is it a special event or open to the public. I like RR trestles. I've ridden across some very sketchy ones in my ATVing days.
It was a special event ten years in the making.

Skyride
Veni, Vidi, Posti
2008 MP3 500, 2013 BV350, 2020 Vespa Sei Giorni
Joined: 13 Oct 2012
Posts: 8514
Location: Ashburn, Va. Home to the Internet
Wed Jul 01, 2020 10:32 am quote
Ok, darn. I do remember you posting about that now that you linked to it.
Member
2018 Sprint 150
Joined: 23 Apr 2019
Posts: 11
Location: Silver Spring, MD, USA
Wed Jul 01, 2020 11:04 am quote
Jim McClain wrote:
The tanks are aluminum, which is a heatsink. The air in a tank would have to get pretty warm to feel it in my nose - a lot warmer than 98.6°.
I would be more concerned about the pressure in the tanks rising to a dangerous level from being heated. I don't know if that is a realistic concern or not.
Enthusiast
2020 GTS 300 Super
Joined: 28 May 2020
Posts: 73
Location: Teh REAL Northern California
Wed Jul 01, 2020 11:34 am quote
Cube wrote:
I would be more concerned about the pressure in the tanks rising to a dangerous level from being heated. I don't know if that is a realistic concern or not.
A few days ago I took a ride during a particularly hot part of the day. When I got home and was putting my gloves under the seat, I touched the tank to see how warm it was. It was warm, but not hot. So I walked out to my Jeep, which sits in the hot sun all the time (I don't have a garage) and grabbed one of the 8 c-tanks I keep in the back. When I opened the back door, a rush of hot air hit me, like it always does when my Jeep has been sitting in the hot sun with the windows up and I can barely stand to sit in it even when I don't close the door until I get the AC going for half a minute or so. Anyway, the tanks were all a lot warmer than the one under the seat of my Vespa right after a 40 or 50 minute ride. The tanks in my Jeep are there day in and day out since I bought it 5 or 6 years ago.

About 10 years ago, a friend and I went to the firing range with our pistols. While I was parked on a dead brain cell, I decided it would be fun to use my half-empty oxygen tank as a target. I changed tanks and put the slightly used one on a board about 30 yards down range. It took a couple shots before I hit it. It fell over and when we checked it, it looks like I just grazed it - small dent in the side. Even at that, you'd a thunk it woulda popped or exploded. So we tried again (I think we moved it closer too) and my friend hit it. When it happened, you could hear the hissing sound and it spun around in a circle on the ground and rolled a bit. He hit it off-center with a 22. We were a little disappointed it didn't explode. I finally hit it a couple times with my 9mm, but the fun was over and we left it in the trash barrel.

I know o2 tanks can be dangerous, but I don't have any fear that they will spontaneously explode in my Jeep, or now in my Vespa.
Hooked
2009 Vespa GTS300 S
Joined: 28 Nov 2017
Posts: 204
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
Wed Jul 01, 2020 12:41 pm quote
Jim McClain wrote:
Sledge wrote:
Keep your eyes out for a wind sock and take appropriate action if its horizontal.
I don't know about all of California, but they don't have windsocks anywhere I've been in the Sierra Nevadas. It would be a good idea though. We do have lots of tall, skinny trees that sway in the slightest breeze. And when there ain't, there's other telltale signs.

Sledge wrote:
However there is some wind you want to avoid riding into.
I hear ya. Truth is, where I live, skunks are roadkill a lot. My first time out on the Vespa I had to ride by a dead skunk in the other lane and I could smell it long before I got to it. Ya get used to it when you live around here. Sometimes they don't smell.
wow Jim, that is just a most beautiful shot. Way better than that 9mm of yours.
Just bought myself a secondhand Sony A5100 cheap to take on my rides. If my shots come out half as good as yours then I will be stoked.
Enthusiast
2020 GTS 300 Super
Joined: 28 May 2020
Posts: 73
Location: Teh REAL Northern California
Wed Jul 01, 2020 1:10 pm quote
NZscoot wrote:
wow Jim, that is just a most beautiful shot. Way better than that 9mm of yours.
Just bought myself a secondhand Sony A5100 cheap to take on my rides. If my shots come out half as good as yours then I will be stoked.
Thank you so much. I clicked the thumbs-up button, but I'm not sure how that works here - can't tell if you get notified or what when someone clicks that or the thumbs-down one.
Hooked
2009 Vespa GTS300 S
Joined: 28 Nov 2017
Posts: 204
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
Sun Jul 05, 2020 12:46 am quote
I just put a ride report up with a slide show of photos off the A5100. No post processing, just playing with the different modes and HDR/DRO options. I am searching for those settings that will have a wow factor and reflect the ambience of the moment.

A fine balance tho to not let the photography spoil the ride and visa versa.
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