Could use a little help.
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Hooked
1981 P200E / 1979 P200E / 1974 Rally 200
Joined: 30 Jul 2009
Posts: 454
Location: San Francisco, CA
Fri Aug 28, 2020 7:57 pm quote
(Angry Beaker has left the chat)
Style Maven
74 50s x3 78 P200 84 Cosa PK50XL2 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special '66(?) Super125
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7855
Location: seattle/athens
Fri Aug 28, 2020 8:19 pm quote
Seriously Joe, everybody who wants you to somehow succeed needs to see what this frame looks like under the bondo and paint FIRST.
You're betting your life that it's safe and you better be right.

How hard is it to get that other frame with papers and a matching VIN? And what's the VIN on this one?
Just use sandpaper where it's supposed to be and you should find something.
Addicted
bare metal cafe racer
Joined: 01 Sep 2017
Posts: 1000
Location: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Fri Aug 28, 2020 8:45 pm quote
GoSlash27 wrote:
pheasant plucker wrote:
GoSlash27 wrote:
Joefromthefuture wrote:
It's a good thing I have you guys here to make sure I get it done right then, eh?
Hardly. Few of them want to help you and even fewer of them know how.

Best,
-Slashy
Even you think this is a bad idea. So it isn’t help... it’s enabling. Hope you are also up for helping him wipe his arse when he wrecks.
And what's it to you, or me, or anyone else? Are you riding his bike? No. Is it your ass or wallet if it doesn't work out? No.
The one thing I hate above all others is a man who takes it upon himself to dictate to others what is in their own best interest.
The man has made his decision. You will now either lead, follow, or get out of the way.
Best,
-Slashy
Been thinking about why this is getting under my skin.

It's like a patient saying to his Dr... hey look. I've lost all this weight without trying! I look great. Then the Dr asking some questions and going... Yeah nah... I think you have cancer. And the sort of cancer you have has a 90% mortality. But... if we act quick and cut it out then you have a really good chance of surviving. Then the patient is like "I'm not so sure... can we run some tests? The Drs like... sure, but know that delaying is decreasing your chance of a good outcome. Then they are like... well you know what... I like this weight loss. In fact I'm gonna go buy a whole new wardrobe. I watched a video and people can fight this with homeopathy. Can you tell me how to use homeopathy? The Drs like... I really don't recommend that and don't know anything about homeopathy. Then some other patient chimes in with - hey, I had a similar cancer and fought it with homeopathy. Don't listen to that quack - I know way more than any Dr. In fact I call myself a Dr... I'm the king of Drs. And they all know nothing and don't care about you as proven by the fact they wont treat you with homeopathy.

This issue is that Joe has swapped objectives for this project multiple times and it's throwing us all. First it was" safe and legal resto". That there is the issue - this is not a good starting point. Then it was "learn something tearing down this bodge". And we would all be fine with supporting that - except the first objective hasn't been put to bed. And now it's actually turned out to be a custom spec resto to look like a bike that this isn't. Which again... this is not a good starting point.

Slashy - "The one thing I hate above all others is a man who takes it upon himself to dictate to others what is in their own best interest."

You are biased by the fact that you want to prove some point about bodges and make the rest of us look bad. The only person I see here with a personal interest in this is you. Hypocrite much?

Joe - legitimately keen to help. Suggest stick to tear this down and learn something. I think you will be disappointed trying to achieve the others. Impossible? No. Irrational tho. Time, money, and experience in large quantities. Probably a decent dose of luck. And the clash in these objectives is trolling the thread.

Olive branch... I like the meme/imagery of this FLCL SS 180 and the bass. Here's my take... Anyone else wanna play?

IMG_7066.jpg

Enthusiast
150cc Vespa 1967
Joined: 22 Aug 2020
Posts: 62
Location: Athens GA
Fri Aug 28, 2020 9:05 pm quote
I'm honestly impressed with how heated this stuff gets. I've said it over and over again I'm willing to throw the money towards replacing the frame and engine, and hell any other parts that are no good.

I get that it's not the cheapest way to get your hands on a Vespa but it seems to be the most fun.

As someone who hasn't experienced much of a two wheeler motor community, I sure as hell hope the other ones are better than this LMFAO

Shout out to the people actually giving some help and advice on moving forward with this project though. I've gotten a few DMs from other people giving some actual help and it's no wonder they move to DMs rather than posting here. Fair bit of assholes

Taking off the Bondo and paint is my next step in this, I don't plan on running this frame if it can't be saved. I've said that before. Hints the reason I got another body I'm looking at.

It kinda feels like the Vespa community is just a ton of snobby guys unwilling to think outside the box here. (Again, shout out to the nicer folk actually helping me out with advice here and in the DMs)
Enthusiast
150cc Vespa 1967
Joined: 22 Aug 2020
Posts: 62
Location: Athens GA
Fri Aug 28, 2020 9:24 pm quote
As for goals with this project, I'm allowed to have many right?

The big one I wanna complete is to own my dream vehicle. The 180 from FLCL.

From there I obviously wanna drive it, meaning the next step is making sure it's road safe.

As for it being a learning experience, that's just kinda happening on it's own.
Enthusiast
150cc Vespa 1967
Joined: 22 Aug 2020
Posts: 62
Location: Athens GA
Fri Aug 28, 2020 9:25 pm quote
pheasant plucker
P.s that photo dope as shit.

glad to know there's another bassist in here lmao

Also love the metal looks of yours! Hot damn that vespa sexy
Hooked
58 VB1T, 68 SS180, 81 100 Sport
Joined: 06 May 2019
Posts: 431
Location: Long Beach, CA
Fri Aug 28, 2020 10:27 pm quote
I have to say that this is one of the most interesting threads posted here in a while. Roller coaster thru and thru on so many levels. Entertaining, but even more so; enlightening. Obviously there are alot of differing opinions as to what the OP should or should not do. Differing opinions on this particular project, and also to the bigger picture of what should be done for the longevity of the Vintage Scooter Community as a whole.
I strongly believe that all, or atleast most; of the members replying have good intentions. We are all adults here so I'll just offer a different opinion.

There has been alot of good advice in this thread, posted by many experienced scooteriests. Now, some of that advice might not be "supportive" or what you 'want' to hear; but sometimes that is what is necessary. The vintage scooter community is a small one. Much smaller than antique cars, hot rods, choppers, motorcycles, bicycles, rc cars, guitars, fixy bikes or whatever else. There just arent that many people through out the US that truly appreciate how wonderful these machines and the people that come with them are. There just aren't that many of these machines or people around.

Its like special club, where the members all look out for one another thru good bad and ugly. If you are willing help, then you will be offered help. BUT--- If you are looking to do something stupid, wasteful, harmful, dodgy-bodgy or dangerous, deceptive, or just plain harmful to the community; the REAL scooter enthusiasts will give it to you STRAIGHT-UP. No hands holding here my friend. That is how it MUST be for everyones sake. For the good of the community as a whole.



Joe, if you are truly open to learning about a new hobby, and are willing to put in the time, effort, research, TIME and WORK that it requires; then this is the BEST place to be. Hands down. You'll get all the help you need, if you keep an open mind, and be willing to take advice. In the end it is your project, and your time and Money, so the decision is ultimately yours. However, there are many experts on this forum, mechanics, restorations experts, just plain-ol scooter geeks with years of experience getting hands dirty and figuring out what works and what doesn't. That type of knowledge is invaluable. YOU have to invest the time and effort it takes to do research. Asking for help is expected, especially from a newbie. But Its not reasonable to simply post up a "tell me everything I need to do" topic. You need to put in the hours man.

If you really want to get into the vintage scooter hobby, then start with the basics. Get yourself some good tools. Get yourself some good information about the models, and specifics of each. Get yourself a good mechanic if you cant do it yourself, and/or do the research to learn a new skill! Practice your Google-FU for research on this forum and other resources online.

Too many newbies have joined this forum & others, posting up proudly their newly acquired projects; only to find out that their dream bike is not all that they thought it was, or even that they go ripped off with a bondo covered bodge. It can be a hard pill to swallow, especially for a newbie with a new dream scoot. Sometimes you gotta just eat the dirt, pick yourself up and keep walking; even if it means walking away from a dream project.



My personal unsolicited opinion on your particular project is this:
It looks like a lost hope. Frame is bent, and the rest is questionable at best - maybe even dangerous to try to fix and or restore. Its probably not worth spending any money on at all..... best to break it, piece it out, salvage/sell any bits you can and toss the rest. OR give it an artsy paint job and park it in the man cave. Then you can do the research, and spend good money on a good SAFE project that you can be proud of. There are other Vespas out there if you actively search. The one you found is not the only one, it just might take some time and effort to find another.

If you are determined to proceed, and atleast see what you are working with; take the advice many others have given - strip down the frame to bare metal and see what you've got. That is the bare minimum you need to do to see if this project is feasible. and do some research! Spend hours and hours and hours on the computer learning everything you can about Vespas, models, technical, mechanical, parts resources, etc.


(( TBH the experts here have chimed in and offered expert advice - its likely not fixable and if truly a "bodge" better off not seeing any pavement at any speed at all. Too many dangerous bodges on the road already. )) ***** Yes bodges can be fixed, if you have the time/money/resources/skills to do so. There are some examples of members scooters on this forum - yes it can be done! But for the average person who doesn't know any better, they should be avoided. And gawd forbid the bodge gets built and made shiny, put up for sale, passed on yet again to the next sucker who doesn't know any better.

Whatever you do just please dont make a bodgy Sprint into a fake Super Sport. The trap head is cool as is, doesn't need to be a fake SS180. If your true dream bike is an SS180, then get one of those. Or just accept the trap head Sprint for what it is, those are cool too!

A wise man will listen intently to the Wiser OLD master. I'm no master, amny others here are; but I do love these old scooters. Whichever path you choose, I wish you the best of luck in your adventures.


I know I dont post here as much as others, especially not lately as life has been kra kra crazy. Scooters have been a big part of my life for 20+ years. Currently finishing up 1 of 6 projects since I've recently moved to a different state. Hoping to get on the road again soon before the weather changes.

Thanks for reading the ol scooter boys thoughts.
Good luck and scoot safe everyone!
- Rawwr
Addicted
bare metal cafe racer
Joined: 01 Sep 2017
Posts: 1000
Location: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Fri Aug 28, 2020 11:26 pm quote
Joefromthefuture wrote:
P.s that photo dope as shit.

glad to know there's another bassist in here lmao

Also love the metal looks of yours! Hot damn that vespa sexy
Thanks man - only recently ‘finished’. In that my objective of safe and legal can be ticked off. I added a bunch of objectives along the way... but only as I learnt and realized what could be achieved.

I watched an episode of FLCL. Crazy legit anime. Know that when I say weeb I don’t use it in a derogatory way- my daughter is a total weeb. We have Animelab on the TV and I help her cosplay. I get the buzz.

I was where you are 2 years ago. I managed to return my Indo bodged Sprint and get my money back. FWIW I’m fairly certain yours is Indo - just has all the hallmarks and doesn’t look like a Vietnamese bodge. I opted to use a legit frame and have spent time and money to get it where it is. Plus luck. And instead of experience I researched and designed and trialed and re-did. And asked those with experience when I got stuck - many have helped me. As will many here help you... if you want it and let them.

A Sportique in better shape than mine was just sold recently here for $450 (USD). Not an SS 180 tho - they are rare and therefore pricey.

You are in a great position tho - like me you don’t care much for provenance or original restoration. Imo it makes a lot easier - especially if you goal is a custom restoration to ‘appear’ like the FLCL bike. Almost any large frame could be made to work - obviously some easier than others. But add a trap head and big cowls and you are there.

That GL would be awesome. Something that came with 10” wheels and therefore the fork setup is right. It has a really similar look. But you can buy trap heads, cowls, horncasts, mudguards... Now I understand the build aim I get why the SS 180 badge and it makes sense. I think my badge is from a modern twistie! Once you walk away from ‘original’ and come to the dark side of ‘custom’ then there is a lot of freedom.

Apart from the frame there is only a (literal) handful of ‘original’ parts on my bike.

And yeah... bass rules.
Addicted
bare metal cafe racer
Joined: 01 Sep 2017
Posts: 1000
Location: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Fri Aug 28, 2020 11:51 pm quote
Gotta day it again... that GL would be such a good starting point for your main objective. The lights, headset, cowls, and guard all seem right. The fork is different but 10” and guessing shocks are way easier to find compare to an actual SS 180. And a title... and you can actually see the frame - there is probably no bog on it. I mean there’s barely any paint either. It just can’t hide anything serious.

I don’t know how hard it is to title a bike with no papers in the US. But guessing that is worth a lot of time and money in itself.

The crew on here love hunting for ‘deal of the day’. I’ve noticed prices of bikes aren’t too dissimilar between NZ, Aus and the US with the exception of a few models - like the NZ SS 90 (but even those are being driven up by overseas buyers grrrr). $2k seems like a good price for a GL anywhere. But the US guys on here have a really good handle on what US bikes are worth.
Addicted
GL, PK, PE200 with hack, Sears Rust Badge
Joined: 24 Apr 2012
Posts: 912
Location: Deep in the heart of Texas
Sat Aug 29, 2020 6:25 am quote
Joefromthefuture wrote:
It kinda feels like the Vespa community is just a ton of snobby guys unwilling to think outside the box here.
If you really want help from people that will not give you a hard time, go to Facebook Vintage Builders Showcase: https://www.facebook.com/groups/VintageScooterBuildersShowcase.

A bunch of nice chaps on there that will help you get to where you want to go with this project. They really think outside the box and will enjoy progressing a project like this.

Good luck!
Addicted
'64 Motovespa 150S (177) , '66 Allstate SF, '64 VBB, '66 180SS
Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 691
Location: S.Salem, NY
Sat Aug 29, 2020 7:23 am quote
I don't know... this one looks a little bent as well, so you might be on the right track.

flcl-post-900x506.jpg

Addicted
85 Vepsa PX150E with sidecar, 80 P200 with sidecar, 96 Goldwing with Hannigan Sidecar, LR87aj5, LR91aj3
Joined: 11 Oct 2011
Posts: 566
Location: Central Washington State
Sat Aug 29, 2020 7:25 am quote
When I read some of this thread,

" If you kids don't behave I'll put you in the corner for the rest of the day".

comes to mind.

Just saying.
Style Maven
74 50s x3 78 P200 84 Cosa PK50XL2 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special '66(?) Super125
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7855
Location: seattle/athens
Sun Aug 30, 2020 7:24 am quote
So Joe, how about a commitment for a time when we can all see what's under the Bondo and paint. You have managed to generate a lot of interest and a lot of ppl now just gotta see. If you're getting it blasted, call around and make a deal then get it over there. Then lots of pics.

If you're gonna do it yourself, line up a torch and putty knife or a can of stripper. Just go after the structural areas. Looks like it has a new floor at least, but that in itself doesn't have to be a dealbreaker.

Seriously, wanna see what's inside there. Hint: torch it

WE WANNA SEE THE FRAME NEKKID
Addicted
'64 Motovespa 150S (177) , '66 Allstate SF, '64 VBB, '66 180SS
Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 691
Location: S.Salem, NY
Sun Aug 30, 2020 8:22 am quote
What V oodoo said.
Ossessionato
1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2265

Sun Aug 30, 2020 10:56 am quote
Moto64 wrote:
What V oodoo said.
Second that, we need some fresh building.
Banned
Joined: 05 Jun 2020
Posts: 13
Location: USA
Sun Aug 30, 2020 11:01 am quote
Re: hjo
Joefromthefuture wrote:
The hard to find 180 parts I'll most likely do my self if cosmetic like this, and if not I'll most likely just leave it alone.
I think the best choice of cosmetics is very important from this point of view. That is the reason a lot of people choose brands and high-level ones. To avoid any problems from the materials.
Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 2799
Location: Chicago. Well, Evanston, but that's almost Chicago
Mon Aug 31, 2020 7:30 pm quote
GeekLion wrote:
I have to say that this is one of the most interesting threads posted here in a while. Roller coaster thru and thru on so many levels. Entertaining, but even more so; enlightening.
<snip>

Joe, GeekLion gave you some damn good advice here and I hope you read and re-read it, then take it to heart. I've also enjoyed the back-and-forth, and even more, your enthusiasm.

But please hear me when I say that the reason many of us are trying to persuade you to not keep chasing your dream around this particular bike is that we want you to succeed, and we can see, even in a few posts, that you're not equipped to succeed taking on this bike as your first project.

If you want to get into a fresh discussion about what you're hoping to accomplish with a scooter, we can and happily will help you make good decisions, balancing the Engineering Triangle ("You can design things to be Good, Fast, and Cheap. Now pick two."), and pointing you towards the basics of what you need to know so you can search on here, google, and ask progressively better questions that are both helpful to you, but also fun to work through the answers with you.

The reason that so many of us have tried to dissuade you from pursuing this project is because you clearly have a high level of excitement, but I can tell you right now that the approach you're choosing to take is going to lead to disillusionment plus a lot of wasted money at best, and serious injury at worst.

The list of knowledge and skills you need to have to even attempt a project like getting your bike back on the road would take years and numerous projects worth of experience to even have a chance at succeeding.

You stated that you learn from taking things apart to see how they were put together. I get that. I learn in a similar fashion, but if you're going to be learning from something that you have no idea if it was put together right to begin with, you're now getting into GIGO ("Garbage In, Garbage Out"). You can't learn from that if you don't already know what is and isn't correct; and at that point, what you're learning is how to spot bad inputs before they become bad outputs.

Likewise, there's a lot of cultural knowledge and context around here because we've all been typing at, talking to, and sometimes even riding with each other for too many years and which you don't yet have the background to accurately understand. For example, when people reference past events like "Vader's 93MPH scooter that started as a bodge," what they're not mentioning is that he was one of the best builders and mechanics on the West Coast. I mean, his Smallie was featured as a two-page spread in SIP's own magazine, and compared to the tuning and engineering work that the Germans over at German Scooter Forum (GSF, as in "GSF Dyno") are doing, we're a bunch of freakin' cavemen banging rocks together.

I've built and blown up a lot of motors and scooters over the past fifteen years since I started seriously wrenching on Vespa's. I can literally build a pyramid out of all the dead and decommissioned pistons and cylinders in my workshop. Every one of them was an expensive lesson, and that's just one part of many. Even a bare-bones engine rebuild is going to set you back a couple hundred bucks just for replacement parts, assuming you can re-use all the low-wear components like piston, cylinder, clutch, gears, primary drive, flywheel & stator, etc.

And we haven't even gotten into the tools you're going to need, starting with some wrenches, sockets, a decent torque wrench, a flywheel puller, crank puller, heat gun, various bearing and seal punches, a good vernier caliper, vice grips, allen wrenches, a rivet gun, an air compressor, some HPLV sprayers, a bunch of chemicals like strippers, acetone, degreasers, carb cleaner, brake parts cleaner, PB Blaster, an angle grinder with various blades & wheels, a power drill, bits, taps, thread cutters, probably some timeserts (m6, m7, m if I had to guess, a bead breaker or some screw-type c-clamps, a multi-meter, and a timing light.

Plus, you need to know when and how to use every single one of the tools I've listed above. Every one that you don't know that about is going to cost you damage to the expensive replacement parts you just laid out for, plus shipping, and depending on when you learn that you didn't know how to use any one of them, you may be stranded on the side of the road or lying in a hospital bed, and unless you're unlike any bassist I've ever known (my wife's family are pretty much all musicians, and my daughter plays bass among many other instruments), you can't afford to be racking up medical bills instead of playing gigs after your brakes fail or your motor hard seizes at any speed worth mentioning or the headset comes loose from the fork and the front wheel flips sideways.

I used to have a neighbor with a couple of PX125's. He'd had an accident years before which basically destroyed the tendons in his left hand. Good dude, but he definitely wasn't playing any musical instruments for the rest of his life. Do you think that this scooter is worth your livelihood and, I'm assuming, your lifelong passion?

And all of this assumes that the frame itself is somehow salvageable (which I still very much doubt) and you can ultimately obtain a title for it, which is yet another frustrating and time-consuming task that you'll need if you ever want to ride it anywhere without worrying constantly about getting pulled over..

OK...that was a wall of text, and I'm still not quite finished.

My final request, again, is that if you really want to get a scooter, listen to the advice you're getting here. There's decades, if not centuries, of experience with these machines. Let people help you. Learn about what you're getting into. Right now, you're frankly not qualified to even have an opinion on whether or not any particular scooter is good, bad, or right for you.

This was a lot of writing and a decent chunk of my time. Please take it as a plea to let us help you succeed.

Of course, it could always be worse...you could want a Lambretta.
Enthusiast
15 Chief Vintage 80 P200E 12 Stella
Joined: 21 May 2010
Posts: 82
Location: San Antonio, TX
Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm quote
This thread has sucked me in! It's ModernVespa distilled to one thread!

I've been off this forum for about six years, after my green wire turned to dust, I bought a house, etc. I finally got time to restore my P200 so I came back here--to deal with the pettiness, hurt feelings, people who don't know when to quit, (or when not to start, LOL) so I could mine those nuggets of knowledge gold from folks like Greasy. As for the safety and the money--he's spot on. My budget of 3000 to zero time my scoot will make her worth...maybe 3000, but doubt it! And she's straight, rust free, and dent free.

Though it is far too late, my advice would to be what I did for my restoration effort: I spent time deciding what I wanted to do, examined exactly what I had mechanically and body-wise, and developed a logical plan to get there component by component. Document, disassemble, clean, package.

It's cool that the OP is in it for fun, but this is almost like watching Dr. Pimple popper for the cringe factor.
Member
Joined: 14 Jan 2018
Posts: 38
Location: H-town, TX
Fri Sep 11, 2020 7:59 am quote
Any updates on the progress of the project??

Hooked
1981 P200E / 1979 P200E / 1974 Rally 200
Joined: 30 Jul 2009
Posts: 454
Location: San Francisco, CA
Fri Sep 11, 2020 3:05 pm quote
markosmarkos wrote:
Any updates on the progress of the project??

:popcorn:
I'm curious to see what was under the flller/paint on that frame!
Enthusiast
150cc Vespa 1967
Joined: 22 Aug 2020
Posts: 62
Location: Athens GA
Fri Sep 11, 2020 3:33 pm quote
Body update! (Cringe warning)
Me being the country white boy redneck that I am, after taking a grinder to the body for a while on clearly welded spots, a few professional tests to ensure it's safe to run (aka jump on it and may or may not have taken a baseball bat to clear weak points) I've determined that considering I will most likely just be using it for round-town driving I'll be sticking with this frame for the time being and focus on other aspects of the bike.

Talking to my buddy about it he said the welds look to be done fine but is willing to re-weld it if requested. He said he would have no issues using it as his own daily driver.

I'll post some photos of the welds tonight once I get my buddy to send me some.
Addicted
'64 Motovespa 150S (177) , '66 Allstate SF, '64 VBB, '66 180SS
Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 691
Location: S.Salem, NY
Fri Sep 11, 2020 3:47 pm quote
cool
Ossessionato
1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2265

Fri Sep 11, 2020 4:23 pm quote
Welded or not , you are doing the right thing finding out whats under the paint, good start. My frame had a P series floor welded on it and the proper vbb brake pedal rod cut off, I fixed it so its proper, did my own fabricating welding and painting , its all about the journey and creating memories and making new friends.
Molto Verboso
08 GTS 250, 79 P200E, 62 Allstate
Joined: 11 Jan 2006
Posts: 1713
Location: Florence, OR
Fri Sep 11, 2020 9:26 pm quote
So FutureJoe - no stripping the frame? Or straightening it?
Style Maven
74 50s x3 78 P200 84 Cosa PK50XL2 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special '66(?) Super125
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Posts: 7855
Location: seattle/athens
Sat Sep 12, 2020 12:41 am quote
pics
Enthusiast
150cc Vespa 1967
Joined: 22 Aug 2020
Posts: 62
Location: Athens GA
Wed Sep 16, 2020 1:39 pm quote
Sorry for the delay with the promised photos, it's been a rough week for health reasons.

While definitely sketch, the frame seems to have been welded very well. If only they put more effort in grinding it smooth lmfao.

Going to have someone run by to check the vin number to be sure the frame isn't a part of a stolen bike. If not, I'll be moving forward with it relatively soon.

119565510_1494712554032423_4351547332395840822_n.jpg

119597414_2711690889150041_367044090200729516_n.jpg

Sergeant at Arms
Weird 80's Vespas & Cool Vintage Lambrettas
Joined: 21 Oct 2005
Posts: 7952
Location: The state of insanity, SoCal
Wed Sep 16, 2020 2:07 pm quote
hard pass.
Ossessionato
1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2265

Wed Sep 16, 2020 2:16 pm quote
Ok that weld on second pic certainly explains the twist.
Enthusiast
150cc Vespa 1967
Joined: 22 Aug 2020
Posts: 62
Location: Athens GA
Wed Sep 16, 2020 2:51 pm quote
Just stickin' with the idea of "it's lasted this long" (And survived being beaten with a baseball bat on the welded spots lmao)
Addicted
'64 Motovespa 150S (177) , '66 Allstate SF, '64 VBB, '66 180SS
Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 691
Location: S.Salem, NY
Wed Sep 16, 2020 2:55 pm quote
Go for it ! I want to see it naked.
Ossessionato
1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2265

Wed Sep 16, 2020 2:59 pm quote
Moto64 wrote:
Go for it ! I want to see it naked.
I agree just keep going with the paint stripping.
Addicted
'64 Motovespa 150S (177) , '66 Allstate SF, '64 VBB, '66 180SS
Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 691
Location: S.Salem, NY
Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:09 pm quote
Welds don't have to be pretty to be strong and , unlike MIG , penetration's not so much an issue with gas. You really can't just lay a bead on top of the metal.
Hooked
1981 P200E / 1979 P200E / 1974 Rally 200
Joined: 30 Jul 2009
Posts: 454
Location: San Francisco, CA
Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:16 pm quote
If it's stolen, it's most likely not stolen in the US. More common with old bikes is tons of old registration fees.

But if it's an import, it may never have been registered. And the numbers are often even registered wrong, bc it's shorter than 17 digits.

The most important part of the frame is the center channel. This is the weight-bearing part.

The sheet metal parts (legshield/floor, even parts of the rear section) can be replaced, or bought as stamped panels to partially replace.

worb5-Sheet-metal-work-Vespa-Lambretta-17-Close-holes-1.JPG
Frame channel

worb5-Sheet-metal-work-Vespa-Lambretta-21-Haltbestrebe-Leg-plate-thicker-finished-1.JPG
fork channel

reparaturblech-seitenteil-rahmen-hinten-links-vespa-vba-vbb-vnb4-6~3.jpg
You can buy whole pieces like this, and use them for patching.

repair-sheet-metal-legshield-vespa-sprint-rally-gt-gtr-gl-ts-super~2.jpg
You can buy this whole stamped piece for like $130, plus shipping from far away. But still requires some high end metal work to use.

Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 2799
Location: Chicago. Well, Evanston, but that's almost Chicago
Thu Sep 17, 2020 6:52 am quote
hjo wrote:
You can buy this whole stamped piece for like $130, plus shipping from far away. But still requires some high end metal work to use.
But in that SIP Video, they make it look so easy!
Ossessionato
1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2265

Thu Sep 17, 2020 8:10 am quote
chandlerman wrote:
hjo wrote:
You can buy this whole stamped piece for like $130, plus shipping from far away. But still requires some high end metal work to use.
But in that SIP Video, they make it look so easy!
He sure did make it look easy especially with the big welder tool. I've been through replacing a floor and all I can say is go easy with the grinder on the metal you want to keep for welding too.
Ossessionato
Joined: 26 Oct 2015
Posts: 2635

Thu Sep 17, 2020 8:25 am quote
at least there was no surprises hiding under that yellow paint.
Hooked
1981 P200E / 1979 P200E / 1974 Rally 200
Joined: 30 Jul 2009
Posts: 454
Location: San Francisco, CA
Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:55 am quote
chandlerman wrote:
But in that SIP Video, they make it look so easy! :P
That spot welder is so satisfying to watch. I've only ever seen it done by drilling/mig welding. That works, but the spot welds are original.
Hooked
Rat 2003 Stella 2T; 1979 P125x (in pieces, out for paint)
Joined: 12 Sep 2015
Posts: 234
Location: Madtown
Fri Sep 18, 2020 3:56 am quote
Wouldn't it cost like a hundred bucks to blast the frame? You're in Athens, Ga, right? Surely a farmer has a blasting booth in a barn somewhere.

Or take it to a powder-coater; don't powder coat it, just have them blast it for you.
Addicted
85 Vepsa PX150E with sidecar, 80 P200 with sidecar, 96 Goldwing with Hannigan Sidecar, LR87aj5, LR91aj3
Joined: 11 Oct 2011
Posts: 566
Location: Central Washington State
Fri Sep 18, 2020 7:50 am quote
yackee wrote:
Wouldn't it cost like a hundred bucks to blast the frame? You're in Athens, Ga, right? Surely a farmer has a blasting booth in a barn somewhere.

Or take it to a powder-coater; don't powder coat it, just have them blast it for you.
Sorry Yackee you're kicking a dead horse.
Hooked
Rat 2003 Stella 2T; 1979 P125x (in pieces, out for paint)
Joined: 12 Sep 2015
Posts: 234
Location: Madtown
Fri Sep 18, 2020 9:12 am quote
Rob98801 wrote:
yackee wrote:
Wouldn't it cost like a hundred bucks to blast the frame? You're in Athens, Ga, right? Surely a farmer has a blasting booth in a barn somewhere.

Or take it to a powder-coater; don't powder coat it, just have them blast it for you.
Sorry Yackee you're kicking a dead horse.
It's mystifying. It's crazy. I was in a similar situation (a clean p125x frame with mystery spray on it) and spent two hours with a wire wheel and drill, and $25 on various solvents, before realizing what should have been blindingly obvious-- that hand-stripping one of these frames was about the dumbest waste of time, no matter what your time is worth. Even if you worked at Popeye's making $6.50 an hour I don't think it would be worth your time to hand-strip it. If stripping was fun, *maybe*, but stripping isn't fun, it makes a mess, and if you don't have a respirator you breathe in harmful dust.
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