Backpack + ROK straps vs moto luggage
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Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 231
Location: San Francisco
Sat Aug 29, 2020 11:49 pm quote
I've got a GTS Touring (/w luggage rack), and I want to start touring on it.

I ride in California, so I don't want to make it any wider, and I'm skeptical that I could comfortably store a multinight trip's worth of stuff in the tunnel between my knees. It seems like my best option is to strap a bag either to the pillion or luggage rack, depending on how much it weighs.

I could get a motorcycle-specific bag like the Kurykakyn Torke, or I could get a backpack like the Patagonia Cragsmith and some ROK straps to keep it secured.

The Cragsmith is nice because the back zips off, so you can see everything in your bag without digging. My current backpack becomes a mess on a long trip, because you can't see the bottom of it when the zipper only goes halfway down. As a backpack, the Cragsmith also seems more versatile: easier to take on non-moto trips, and to carry when the Vespa is parked.

Is there a reason to prefer motorcycle-specific luggage? It would be more waterproof, although I can't imagine riding in rain heavy enough to care. It's also designed to be secured to a bike, but I don't see why I couldn't just attach some ROK straps to a regular bag, secured to either the grab rail or luggage rack.
Ossessionato
2010 ThunderFly 190, 2008 250 GTS
Joined: 29 Apr 2011
Posts: 2768
Location: Springboro, OH
Mon Aug 31, 2020 7:42 am quote
Have you considered a front rack? I done several long multi-day trips with a simple rubber dry-bag (think whitewater rafting) secured with Rok Straps. I put a black microfiber cloth under the straps on the side of the bag closest to the headlight to reduce headlight glare and bounce back.

Then you can put some stuff on the rear and front to spread the load. It will help with stability. Faco makes a rack that requires no drilling and is very secure. I recommend putting clear vinyl or stickers where the rubber feet of the rack make contact with the legshield.

AV 2019 scoot pose.jpg
Amerivespa 2019, 6 days on the road.

Dragon lean1.jpg
At Tail of the Dragon after riding the entire length of the BRP - no shifting issues.

Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 231
Location: San Francisco
Mon Aug 31, 2020 7:52 am quote
🤔

Hadn't really considered that. Was thinking more "what's the minimum I'd need to have a nice trip." I think I'll try a back and some ROK straps on the back this weekend. If I don't like the feel, I can always upgrade to yours. 🙂
Ossessionato
2016 Vespa GTS 300 i.e. ABS, 2010 Vespa GTS 300 ie Super (sold) & 2003 Honda Shadow VT750 ACE (sold) & 2006 Vespa LX150 (sold)
Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Posts: 3164
Location: Toronto (formerly Montreal)
Mon Aug 31, 2020 8:08 am quote
Depends what the trip is, and how long.

If you are camping, the gear will take up the pillion seat secured by ROK straps.

If not camping, depends what clothing you need. If just jeans, and T-shirts and such, dry bags work really well, with clothing rolled inside. Two dry bags should be plenty to carry everything on the pillion seat, again, secured by ROK straps. If fancier clothing is necessary, then specialized motorcycle bags might be necessary.

If camping, then I recommend saddle bags for clothing and sundries, the type that drape over (or under), the saddle. I know you said you wanted to avoid width, but saddle bags never got in my way, though filtering options could be fewer.

Finally, depending on where youíre riding, I recommend carrying 5 litres of fuel in a container on the floor. It removes the anxiety of miscalculating refuelling stops. Securing a gas can: best option is a Classic Rack with ROK Pack Straps. Cheaper option: add some cheap but sturdy D-rings using the 4 screws securing the battery cover. I saw a thread here showing that. Iíll see if I can find it and post a link.

EDIT: check out this thread: Your experences carrying extra gas?
Ossessionato
73 & 74 Rally, 76 ET3, 80 P200, 06 PX150, 61 Ser 2, 65 Silver Special, 86 & 96 Elite 80s, 2015 HD Road Glide Special, 2011 Ural Tourist
Joined: 18 Jan 2012
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Location: Oceanside, CA
Mon Aug 31, 2020 8:36 am quote
If youre just going to take off for a weekend Iíd say use what you got. If youíre going to go cross country invest in some good gear/ a front rack. Definitely Rok Straps regardless of what setup you choose. Amazing product!

Between the glovebox, underseat storage, tunnel, pillion and then the rear rack youíve got a lot of spots to put gear. Put your tools and stuff that you dont need immediate access to in the glovebox and the underseat storage. Wallet and phone in your jacket, Hotel bag/ something youíll bring in at night- pillion. Gas can on the rear rack (1-2 gallon max is a nice insurance plan). That leaves you the option of something on the floor, a front rack and you can still wear a backpack too.

Moto centric luggage is great but a simple lined gym bag or a backpack can work and secure better. All about what works for you and your securing points. Iíve bought moto specific stuff (Harley, Bikerís Friend x3, T-bags) and they just sit and collect dust. A gym bag and a milk crate take more luggage than any of those do.

When I first started touring on my 74 Rally 200 I took a few small overnighters to see what worked for me. I knew from the beginning that I didnt want to camp. Couch surfing and airbnbís worked just fine.

My perfect setup was the glovebox loaded with tools/ oil, a backpack with the rain gear/ easy to access stuff (either I wore it or wrapped it around the leg shield with the chest strap), a gym bag with 4 days worth of clothes on the pillion and a 2 gallon gas can on the rear rack. Keep the heavy stuff close to the center/ over the wheels for stability.

Now, Ive changed my setup to a 1 gallon gas can on the floorboards, glovebox is tools/oils, camelback/backpack for easy to access stuff and a gym bag on the rear rack. Staying in hotels/ airbnbís every night with laundry facilities.

Take a small overnighter Labor Day weekend and see what works/ doesnt. Itíll be a fun experiment and you dont have to worry about much. Everyone speaks English, you dont need to bribe any cops and everywhere takes Visa!

Good luck.

PS. Dont forget a bottle opener!!!!! You never know how much you need one at the end of the day.

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All I needed to go from SD to Napa and back.

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Current setup. Gym bag and optional bag on rear rack missing in this photo.

Veni, Vidi, Posti
946
Joined: 18 Jun 2007
Posts: 6164
Location: Acworth, GA
Mon Aug 31, 2020 11:47 am quote
MJRally wrote:
PS. Dont forget a bottle opener!!!!! You never know how much you need one at the end of the day.
This. For realz... I had to learn this lesson the hard way.
Hooked
SilverWing 600-- 4nprevious Vespa
Joined: 13 Oct 2010
Posts: 421
Location: chattanooga tn
Mon Aug 31, 2020 12:22 pm quote
Get Motorcycle stuff only--waterproof!! Me touring since 1955, Ortleib rubber bags---Aerostich good supplier---they last forever....my case 20 plus years


Big frame Vespa front rack great.....one bag in front, the other on rear rack. Makes easy to fuel up.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
GTS 300, BV 500, Buddy 125
Joined: 05 Apr 2008
Posts: 8164
Location: Houston, TX/Breckenridge, CO
Mon Aug 31, 2020 1:42 pm quote
Dry bag whether motorcycle specific or general purpose kayak/camping depending on size strapped yo seat, rear rack, front rack. Though for up short up to 4 day trips, longer if Iíll have actress to a laundry I find my Givi 47L top case holds enough unless Iím on a photo tour. Then I need room for DSLR, lenses and tripod as well as laptop or at minimum iPad nd associated chargers.

Then I use a small dry bag on the front rack with clothes in it so I can keep the camera gear in locking storage. Depending on where Iím going Iíll put a gas can on the classic floor rack or MSR bottle(s) under the seat with my spare tools and rain gear. I hate wearing a backpack but mat have a camelback on the curry hook during hot weather and cannonball rides.
Addicted
2016 LXV 150 ie, 1978 Vespa P125, 2019 Piaggio Liberty 150
Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 602
Location: central Illinois USA
Mon Aug 31, 2020 2:04 pm quote
If you are packing stuff on a front rack please remember that you Need that headlight once it starts to get dark and it doesnít take much to start obstructing that light. Been there, did that with both a LXV and a GTS.
Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 231
Location: San Francisco
Tue Sep 01, 2020 8:32 am quote
Thanks all!

I found a Cragsmith on sale with a generous return policy, so I think I'll give that a try first, and swap it for a Torke if this maiden voyage doesn't work as well as I'd like.
cdwise wrote:
Though for up short up to 4 day trips, longer if Iíll have actress to a laundry I find my Givi 47L top case holds enough unless Iím on a photo tour.
I'd read that putting more than a few pounds on the luggage rack is bad news because weight behind the fulcrum unplants your front wheel. You seem to have a lot of experience touring - did you find differently?
Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GT (Rocket): 2005 Vespa GT (Razzo): 2006 Vespa GT (Crash): 2007 Vespa GT (Vanessa): 2009 Yamaha Zuma 125 (Zoom): 2018 Yamaha Xmax (Max),
Joined: 26 Sep 2006
Posts: 4379
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Wed Sep 02, 2020 3:48 am quote
I can carry everything I need on even a three week ride in a bag tied to the scooter with ROK Straps.

I did this last year and even picked up my daughter for one of the weeks.

I was on my Xmax that has much more storage under the seat, but it doesn't have a top case or even rear rack.

With her on board, she carried her goods in a backpack.

My soft suitcase was carried under the seat and my backpack carried like a tunnel bag in the gap in front of the seat.

One important piece of this. Don't carry more than you truly need.

To do this, find a laundry facility every week to 10 days and it all works well.

Bill

Kylie and Bill.JPG
Me with Kylie in Hunter, NY.

Ossessionato
1964 GS 160 MK II, 1967 Vespa GT, 1968 SS180, 1964 Vespa GL, 1964 Vespa VBB, 2006 Buddy 125, 2013 BMW C650GT
Joined: 07 Apr 2008
Posts: 3031
Location: Boca Raton, Florida
Wed Sep 02, 2020 5:50 am quote
WLeuthold wrote:
To do this, find a laundry facility every week to 10 days and it all works well.

Bill
Or wash something in the motel sink then remove the light bulb from the mini fridge leave the door open and hang it over the coils. Dry in the morning!
Addicted
2013 GTS300ie
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 964
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Wed Sep 02, 2020 5:59 am quote
maggiegirl wrote:
If you are packing stuff on a front rack please remember that you Need that headlight once it starts to get dark and it doesnít take much to start obstructing that light. Been there, did that with both a LXV and a GTS.
Consider strapping the front bag UNDERNEATH the front rack on the GTS.
That way the headlight is left open.
You can often get away with using the lower tube bracket only.

Last edited by Fudmucker on Fri Sep 04, 2020 7:53 pm; edited 1 time in total
Addicted
2018 Vespa 300 GTS Touring
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 773
Location: NYC
Wed Sep 02, 2020 6:42 am quote
Checkout Quezzie's post on MV. She has put together her list for packing and carrying for traveling on the Vespa.
A Short Scooterist on a Long Ride: Around the USA by Vespa
Addicted
2014 GTV 300ie
Joined: 05 Mar 2016
Posts: 772
Location: Charleston SC
Wed Sep 02, 2020 10:05 am quote
Waterproof bags, ROC straps and bungee net. One week's worth of camping gear and clothes...

PaulGTVmed.jpg

Addicted
2006 LX150, 2009 250, '80 P200, '80 PX200
Joined: 07 Jan 2009
Posts: 580
Location: San Diego
Wed Sep 02, 2020 6:16 pm quote
Yes You Can!
My husband and ! have traveled by Vespa in Europe, four different times, for two weeks.
You can strap a 21Ē or 24Ē bag behind you, and then we use the case to put carryon or purse. We strap on with bungees. We were supposed to be in England and Wales this summer, but...... the Rona.

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Addicted
2013 GTS300ie
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 964
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Fri Sep 04, 2020 7:48 pm quote
From my experience with bungees, they only come in two lengths...
too short and too long.

Since being made aware of ROK straps, I use nothing else.
They combine adjust ability with tension.
I highly recommend them.

(PS - I don't make them, sell them or get paid royalties!)
Addicted
2013 GTS300ie
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 964
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Fri Sep 04, 2020 8:24 pm quote
Another useful tip from 20+years of bike touring:

Big clear ziplock plastic bags.
I pack bags with a rolled / folded T-shirt, underwear and socks.
One bag = one day when using outer riding gear.
I pack one bag extra with cold weather versions.

When I stop for the night, I shower and change into clean clothes.
I wash the dirties with liquid detergent in the shower, squeeze out and hang to dry overnight. I sleep in the clean ones.
If the washed ones are still damp in the morning, I put them in a mesh bag with ties that goes on top of everything on the bike / scoot with my towel to dry out as I ride.

The real joy is that you can carry clean and dry clothing together with dirty or damp clothing in the same bag.

You can unpack and repack whole bag in a minute when you have to look for something and just can't find it.
If your waterproof bag turns out not to be as advertised, the ziplock bags keep the clean stuff dry.

Jeans for evening wear, a pair of shorts and a cotton sweatsuit for casual wear make up the rest of my clothing.
One pair of running shoes and beach thongs / flip flops are fine for the feet if you are using riding boots every day.

Safe riding!
Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 231
Location: San Francisco
Mon Sep 14, 2020 12:25 am quote
Once again, thanks for all the tips!

I may end up with the Torke after all. My parents wanted to get me a Vespa cover for my birthday, but I'm skeptical of them in the wind, so they asked if there's any moto luggage I had my eye on. 😈

I stayed local for the long weekend, but I'm looking forward to this smoke clearing so I can give an overnight trip a go.
Ossessionato
73 & 74 Rally, 76 ET3, 80 P200, 06 PX150, 61 Ser 2, 65 Silver Special, 86 & 96 Elite 80s, 2015 HD Road Glide Special, 2011 Ural Tourist
Joined: 18 Jan 2012
Posts: 3750
Location: Oceanside, CA
Mon Sep 14, 2020 7:42 am quote
How about this, I havenít had any takers on my moto luggage selling locally so if you ride down to from SF to Oceanside before the 22nd you can have any or all of the moto luggage I own collecting dust. Depending on when you show, if the Airbnb in my backyard is open you can crash there. Thereís also plenty of clean air too Itís a nice two day ride and Iíll give you some killer suggestions for the route here/back.

PM me for details
Hooked
2020 Vespa GTS Touring 300
Joined: 16 Feb 2020
Posts: 144
Location: Northern California
Mon Sep 14, 2020 2:39 pm quote
I was going to say that getting out of town on 2 wheels with this air quality here is maybe not in one's best interest, and then I also noticed it's actually not much better down there today either:

Air_Quality-West-Coast.09.14.20.jpg

Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 231
Location: San Francisco
Mon Sep 28, 2020 8:34 am quote
Got the Torke and tested it with a La Croix run.

An 8-can box of La Croix is 5" x 5" x 10.5". Considering the stated size of this is 11" x 11" x 18", I figured I could get 6 boxes in there. I can indeed, but only if I take the cans out of their boxes. In actuality, the Torke isn't quite as tall as it is deep, and the corners are rounded. Any more than 3 boxes would have been difficult to zip without risking the bag.

It was straightforward to attach and remove. Even empty, I was able to secure it to the luggage rack: the straps held the rack open and the bag in-place.

I could definitely feel the weight in the handling of the bike with the bag loaded up, but I trusted the bag not to budge. Felt a bit like having a passenger. I knew I was exceeding the weight limit sticker (~30lbs vs the 13 it's rated for), so I only rode a careful mile, but it felt completely safe.

I like that the bag's about as broad as I am, so it wouldn't change my dimensions at all for lane splitting. I could also mount it in pillion position if I was concerned about having weight behind the rear tire.

PXL_20200928_003100893.MP.jpg

Member
2012 lxv 150
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Posts: 11
Location: nyc
Tue Oct 06, 2020 1:32 pm quote
When the angle changes, even slightly, the ROK straps come loose. I noticed this happened to me. I noticed after my ride. Im surprised I didnít lose my gym bag. They donít hold well. Others mentioned this in the reviews on ROK straps.
Addicted
2013 GTS300ie
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 964
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Tue Oct 06, 2020 2:11 pm quote
kypreos wrote:
When the angle changes, even slightly, the ROK straps come loose. I noticed this happened to me. I noticed after my ride. Im surprised I didnít lose my gym bag. They donít hold well. Others mentioned this in the reviews on ROK straps.
Be sure you attach the ROK straps correctly. There is a lable on one looped end of the adjustable strap portion. This end must be the FREE end. If you attach to the bike using that looped end, the teeth on the strap adjuster/quick release clamp will be incorrectly aligned and it can slip. The instructions are on that lable.

I also always put a 'half hitch' knot below the release clamp to minimise the chance of slippage, before securing the free ends so they do not flap in the slipstream.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Kitted Vespa 2017 GTV 300, BMW 2019 K1600GT Sport, Ural 2019 Gear Up
Joined: 21 May 2017
Posts: 7601
Location: Downtown Toronto
Tue Oct 06, 2020 2:17 pm quote
I might be a little late to the party here but swear by Kriega. Quality motorbike luggage gear you can own for a lifetime.

https://kriega.com
Enthusiast
í20 GTS 300 hpe
Joined: 28 Sep 2019
Posts: 71
Location: NYC
Tue Oct 06, 2020 4:15 pm quote
Fudmucker wrote:
kypreos wrote:
When the angle changes, even slightly, the ROK straps come loose. I noticed this happened to me. I noticed after my ride. Im surprised I didnít lose my gym bag. They donít hold well. Others mentioned this in the reviews on ROK straps.
Be sure you attach the ROK straps correctly. There is a lable on one looped end of the adjustable strap portion. This end must be the FREE end. If you attach to the bike using that looped end, the teeth on the strap adjuster/quick release clamp will be incorrectly aligned and it can slip. The instructions are on that lable.

I also always put a Ďhalf hitch' knot below the release clamp to minimise the chance of slippage, before securing the free ends so they do not flap in the slipstream.
+1

I tend to be hard on my gear and the ROK straps havenít failed me yet. I do sometimes combine them with a cargo net, just to make the setup more failsafe.

cargo_on GTS_300.jpg
Summer Cargo

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Granturismo 218
Joined: 04 Feb 2013
Posts: 6356
Location: NWAOK
Wed Oct 07, 2020 7:02 am quote
mayorofnow wrote:
I could definitely feel the weight in the handling of the bike with the bag loaded up, but I trusted the bag not to budge. Felt a bit like having a passenger. I knew I was exceeding the weight limit sticker (~30lbs vs the 13 it's rated for), so I only rode a careful mile, but it felt completely safe.

I like that the bag's about as broad as I am, so it wouldn't change my dimensions at all for lane splitting. I could also mount it in pillion position if I was concerned about having weight behind the rear tire.
The biggest issue I've found with a lot of weight on the rear rack is not whether or not the rack can take it, because it can, but that the more weight you put there, the more violently the front end wants to wobble. With about sixty five pounds back there, it's downright dangerous. Under the seat is probably the best place to carry heavy stuff, and the top case or rear rack serves very well for light, but bulky gear. I think you're on the right track by not wanting to increase the width of the bike with sidebags. These really slow a scooter down.
A good idea if you have the space is to take and wear old clothes that you planned on getting rid of, and getting rid of them instead of washing them. It's a good way to get rid of old teeshirts, underwear and socks.
It never occurred to me to put something under the front rack, but I see the genius in that. One of the big issues I've found with the front rack is that it's hard to find something that is the perfect shape to make full use of the rack and still allow you to steer and have an effective headlight. A bag above and a bag below might just be the ticket.
The passenger seat does offer a lot of possibilities and the bike handles weight better there than on the rear rack, and you might be able to use it as a backrest, but keep in mind that whatever you put there will usually need to come off before you gas up, and then go back on.
Addicted
2013 GTS300ie
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 964
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Wed Oct 07, 2020 10:46 pm quote
On a long trip, I use a waterproof roll-edge bag ROK-strapped down where a pillion would sit. I carry a small day-pack on my back that rests nicely on the pillion bag when I sit. The rear rack is used for my cooler box, with my rain gear in a zipper bag strapped underneath for rapid and easy access.

The front rack is for my sleeping bag + mattress, with tent strapped below the rack if I am camping. If not, then I have a second, smaller roll-edge bag there with clothing and my rain gear underneath.

The under-seat storage is used for valuable / heavier items, tools etc.
I carry spare fuel in a 5litre can tied down on the tunnel above the battery.

Oh the joys of riding solo...
Addicted
2018 Vespa 300 GTS Touring
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 773
Location: NYC
Thu Oct 08, 2020 2:05 am quote
Fudmucker wrote:
Another useful tip from 20+years of bike touring:

Big clear ziplock plastic bags.
I pack bags with a rolled / folded T-shirt, underwear and socks.
One bag = one day when using outer riding gear.
I pack one bag extra with cold weather versions.

When I stop for the night, I shower and change into clean clothes.
I wash the dirties with liquid detergent in the shower, squeeze out and hang to dry overnight. I sleep in the clean ones.
If the washed ones are still damp in the morning, I put them in a mesh bag with ties that goes on top of everything on the bike / scoot with my towel to dry out as I ride.

The real joy is that you can carry clean and dry clothing together with dirty or damp clothing in the same bag.

You can unpack and repack whole bag in a minute when you have to look for something and just can't find it.
If your waterproof bag turns out not to be as advertised, the ziplock bags keep the clean stuff dry.

Jeans for evening wear, a pair of shorts and a cotton sweatsuit for casual wear make up the rest of my clothing.
One pair of running shoes and beach thongs / flip flops are fine for the feet if you are using riding boots every day.

Safe riding!
This is great advice for many who aren't aware of how to travel comfortably without breaking the bank. Thanks for sharing these nuggets of information.
Lot of folks have forgotten how to be creative and frugal while solving problems cuz so many of us have been pampered by the ability to get something/anything within 24 hours or less i.e Amazon Prime or 24 hour hardware stores being open etc. People don't think much of how to do more with less.
Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 231
Location: San Francisco
Tue Oct 13, 2020 7:41 pm quote
I've been mostly happy with the Torke.

There's definitely bar wobble, particularly decelerating into a corner. It's not enough the be bothersome, but noticable if you take yours hands off the bars or when cornering. I'll have to get some heavier bar weights.

My biggest gripe with the Torke is the zipper placement. It's not quite as wide as the bag, and right down the middle of the top panel. The stiffness of the dry bag material can make it cumbersome to load: you can't put a rigid item like a laptop on top, you've got to angle it in and pack it towards the bottom. I'd prefer a U-shaped zipper track that let me open an entire panel or two; that would make packing much easier.
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Triumph Street Scrambler 2018, Suzuki VanVan200 (sold), 2015 Sprint 125 (sold)
Joined: 12 Apr 2015
Posts: 2426
Location: Finland
Thu Oct 15, 2020 12:47 am quote
mayorofnow wrote:
I've been mostly happy with the Torke.

There's definitely bar wobble, particularly decelerating into a corner. It's not enough the be bothersome, but noticable if you take yours hands off the bars or when cornering. I'll have to get some heavier bar weights.

My biggest gripe with the Torke is the zipper placement. It's not quite as wide as the bag, and right down the middle of the top panel. The stiffness of the dry bag material can make it cumbersome to load: you can't put a rigid item like a laptop on top, you've got to angle it in and pack it towards the bottom. I'd prefer a U-shaped zipper track that let me open an entire panel or two; that would make packing much easier.
Based on the picture, it does look like a good fit to your scoot.

I have a 40L dry bag from Givi, quite the same size and shape.
I chose that one because it is also easy to carry by hand, it has a handle and a decent shoulder strap.

It has a full, roll top -style opening at the top. Fully water proof and fairly easy to find small stuff from inside, but not convenient for large objects like laptops.

When I carry my laptop, I actually prefer a backbag just for that. I have one motorcycle laptop backbag from Alpinestars, works perfectly as long as I don't put there anything extra. Well, I've had there my spare pants when I've commuted to work.

I don't personally mind backbags as long as I'll keep them light enough. No advertise, but my Kriega R30 motorcycle backbag is still by far the best I've ever had - but as I'll try to remember to tell everyone, it is designed to be used with a motorcycle riding jacket and can feel uncomfortable with normal/light jackets.

In general, following the same line of advice given here already - although I mainly do use water proof bags, the main thing especially for longer trips is to divide stuff inside into logical, water proof smaller bags. Then it doesn't matter if one has to rummage through the main bag when it is puoring rain.

Oh, and about traps: I do know ROK is a well known brand, but it is not the only one. Many places that sell normal hiking gear have good, strong, secure straps available that can be used for bike bags too.

Screenshot_20201015_112129.jpg

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In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
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Posts: 4142
Location: Latina (Italy)
Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:34 am quote
You are magnificent! All.
Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GT (Rocket): 2005 Vespa GT (Razzo): 2006 Vespa GT (Crash): 2007 Vespa GT (Vanessa): 2009 Yamaha Zuma 125 (Zoom): 2018 Yamaha Xmax (Max),
Joined: 26 Sep 2006
Posts: 4379
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:17 pm quote
Out on a four day ride with the 7 Bridges Scooter Club.

Dry bag and ROK Straps working great.

The bag is strapped onto the duckbill rack, so I donít have to remove it at fuel stops.

45182750-41BD-46B8-93DD-127778C00FFD.jpeg

Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 231
Location: San Francisco
Fri Oct 16, 2020 9:47 pm quote
Rode 15 miles of washboard, hardpack, and gravel today en route to Fern Canyon.

I noticed the straps had come a bit loose at the next gas stop, but they easily cinched back down.

ksrpnlwaakt51.jpg

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