1965 Allstate Resurrection
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Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Wed Sep 30, 2020 6:50 pm quote
So the work has begun… First things first I wanted to see the extent of the rust damage. The primary rust is in the left hand floor board area. Took the foot rails off with the “chisel” method – a piece of cake.

The rust looked really bad from first impressions. The bottom is looking really good, hardly and real rust unlike the top surface.



So I did a very quick wipe down with CLR and a scotch bright pad. The outcome was enlightening showing that there is serious pitting but not holes.

Before:



After:



So my dilemma now is do I leave the patina on the floor boards, or get some matching paint and do a proper repair? If I were to leave it I would treat it with phosphoric acid and then seal it with a coat or two of penetrol. If I were to do a proper repair I would fill the pitting and sand it smooth and then paint it, feathering in the edges up the legshield.

There are quite a few dents and bends that I want to sort out, but the body is pretty straight.

Need to fab a tool…



½” Rod and ½” Pipe. Not going to use that plier. Will get a HF plier.

Next I am going to tear it down completely. Not sure if I am going to take on the engine rebuild or send it to one of the experts on this forum. Also need to address the front end. If someone has a VBB fork they need to get rid of let me know.

More as I progress. Hope to get this going in the next couple of months
Moderator
P200 VNB Li125
Joined: 28 May 2008
Posts: 4432
Location: Hustletown, TX
Thu Oct 01, 2020 5:51 am quote
VBB forks are getting harder and harder to find. Keep an eye on Scootnet.

Maybe ping Jonathan Gick and see if he has anything. He is also a solid option for doing your engine rebuild (and front fork rebuild if needed).
Molto Verboso
bare metal cafe racer
Joined: 01 Sep 2017
Posts: 1031
Location: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Thu Oct 01, 2020 9:37 am quote
Personally I think rust on the floor isn’t patina... it’s just rust.

Just know that Penetrol is great. But... it isn’t chemical (or scratch) resistant. I.e. any gas or 2T that gets on it will eat it. So either have to keep applying it or try find a more permanent fix.

Still - pretty amazing that you managed to clean it up as much as you have.
Sergeant at Arms
Weird 80's Vespas & Cool Vintage Lambrettas
Joined: 21 Oct 2005
Posts: 8022
Location: The state of insanity, SoCal
Thu Oct 01, 2020 2:32 pm quote
truthfully, i'd just leave it as is. treat it and call it done.

once you start with paint and touch up, you're in for a penny and in for a pound.

don't overthink this. KISS

-g
Molto Verboso
bare metal cafe racer
Joined: 01 Sep 2017
Posts: 1031
Location: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Thu Oct 01, 2020 8:01 pm quote
Gonna hide it under rails anyway...

A phosphate coat and Penetrol is quick and easy. Rattle some red on if you must. Bolt the rails on so you can easily remove them if you need to address at a future date.
Molto Verboso
08 GTS 250, 79 P200E, 62 Allstate
Joined: 11 Jan 2006
Posts: 1748
Location: Florence, OR
Thu Oct 01, 2020 8:03 pm quote
pheasant plucker wrote:
Bolt the rails on so you can easily remove them if you need to address at a future date.
This is a great way to get the best of both worlds. Save yourself a bunch of energy and effort if you decide to clean it up more in the future...
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Fri Oct 02, 2020 5:56 am quote
pheasant plucker wrote:
Bolt the rails on so you can easily remove them if you need to address at a future date.
This is great idea.
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Fri Oct 02, 2020 6:40 am quote
So, some more progress in disassembly. Things going relatively smoothly. Scoot is rougher than I would like.

I am not going to replicate qascooters excellent “62 Allstate Cruisaire - getting it back on the road” thread (http://modernvespa.com/forum/topic165005). I am learning much from that and will be doing very similar things. Thanks to all that have contributed to that thread and especially qascooter.





Something lived in here. Will clean it up and then spray rust encapsulate down the tunnel.



Aluminum Head Shroud – I don’t recall them being aluminum – Seems like they were steel??















Seems to be a brand new drum???



Bottom race was a bitch to get off!!

Stay tuned.
Ossessionato
1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2284

Fri Oct 02, 2020 7:21 am quote
Pictures all look pretty good, hopefully you have the original cowling rubber in case you don't care for new.
You did good getting the fork bearing race off if you didn't have to mangle the dust shield getting it off.
Molto Verboso
Vespa
Joined: 19 Jun 2007
Posts: 1179
Location: California
Fri Oct 02, 2020 2:27 pm quote
Looks to be an excellent candidate for a trike.
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Fri Oct 02, 2020 3:05 pm quote
hibbert wrote:
Looks to be an excellent candidate for a trike.
Not too late

Progressing as if I will restore...
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Fri Oct 02, 2020 3:58 pm quote
Todays progress...

Trying a video here: https://youtu.be/-6NlhETO3Yc

Some pics:







Next I am going to work on the body. I have decided that I am going to repair the floorboards, and paint them, and blend with the leg shield.

Engine is still a quandary. I would love to build a mild performance engine but I will be totally upside down with the build.

Question on what to do with 55 year old hardware. Thank goodness for Kroil and impact drivers. I was able to free all of the major nuts and bolts. I had to cut the brake and clutch cables but no big deal. The hardware is grimy and rusty. A carb clean takes any coating off so you then need to re-plate. Should you clean and reuse, or, just go with new hardware throughout?

Having fun with this. I got canned. Not much employment opportunities at the moment. Loving using my tools and playing in the garage. Its taking up my time.
Enthusiast
'66 Sears Cruisaire Smallframe
Joined: 12 Aug 2019
Posts: 73
Location: York, PA
Fri Oct 02, 2020 6:29 pm quote
Chatis wrote:
Question on what to do with 55 year old hardware. Thank goodness for Kroil and impact drivers. I was able to free all of the major nuts and bolts. I had to cut the brake and clutch cables but no big deal. The hardware is grimy and rusty. A carb clean takes any coating off so you then need to re-plate. Should you clean and reuse, or, just go with new hardware throughout?
In for an answer here, as I have the same question. A good amount of the hardware on mine is beat up/stripped out/rusty and I'm wondering if I should just get a whole new set of hardware so it's all new. However, if new stuff isn't the same quality, then it would make sense to only replace what wrecked and clean up the rest.
Molto Verboso
bare metal cafe racer
Joined: 01 Sep 2017
Posts: 1031
Location: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Fri Oct 02, 2020 10:47 pm quote
As soon as you replace one bit of chrome... kinda need to do the lot I think. Otherwise you have some new shiny stuff sticking out amongst the rest. If the old stuff isn’t toast and you can clean it up then it will look cool.

There are different levels of replacement trim. For example you can buy a new Siem headlamps that are original, or a bunch of lesser quality versions - including stuff that is just chromed plastic. Or deviate completely and put LED lamps in.

As for the floorboards - repairing kinda means cutting the old one off and welding a replacement on. Sounds like yours isn’t obviously bad enough that you have to do that. Would make blending very difficult and before you know it you are panel and painting the whole rig. Reckon any filler put on floorboards will fail as they do flex a bit. Perhaps there’s a product you can skim on that would work... perhaps you could sand them flat... but think it’s only 1.5mm sheet so sfa material to work with once there’s rust to deal with.

As Greasy said... KISS. Because the alternative has a way of running away with your time and wallet. No harm in doing as little as possible to get it safe and riding - especially if your starting material is up to it. Not that hard to re-strip and panel and paint at a later date - and much more sensible when you know the bike is riding well. Your patina looks cool - and if you ding/scratch it up you won’t care. Showroom finishes are hard to maintain - these scoots get knocked around if you are using them like they want to be used. The rat/patina vibe has a strong following for a reason.
Molto Verboso
08 GTS 250, 79 P200E, 62 Allstate
Joined: 11 Jan 2006
Posts: 1748
Location: Florence, OR
Sat Oct 03, 2020 7:43 am quote
Sorry to hear about you getting canned. It's a strange time in the world indeed.

KISS, some great advice. You can buy new floor rail rubber and just clean up and straighten the old floor rails. And the legshield trim will polish up nicely.

And I think you'll be pleasantly surprised at how well the existing paint polishes up.
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Sun Oct 04, 2020 1:16 pm quote
I have stripped it down as far as it can go. All that is remaining is the cables and the wiring harness.

I am really in two minds as how to go with this. Appreciate the KISS philosophy, but since I am in it I might as well do it right to not go back later.

I will definitely be painting the floorboards - top and bottom! Only question is if I do the entire thing!! Will be filling in the pits with a polyester skim.

Away from bodywork I have two questions:

1. Should I remove the top and bottom races for the front fork in the body and replace races and bearings, or reuse the originals??

2. Haven't got into it but relating to the wiring harness – currently six volts with points. What additional wires will be needed for a 12V electronic ignition? Voltage regulator? Where do they go? Should I build a custom harness or should I buy a harness. If buy, for which model scooter?

Much thanks,
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Tue Oct 06, 2020 6:24 am quote
BUMP on this...
Chatis wrote:
Away from bodywork I have two questions:

1. Should I remove the top and bottom races for the front fork in the body and replace races and bearings, or reuse the originals??

2. Haven't got into it but relating to the wiring harness – currently six volts with points. What additional wires will be needed for a 12V electronic ignition? Voltage regulator? Where do they go? Should I build a custom harness or should I buy a harness. If buy, for which model scooter?
C
Molto Verboso
Vespa
Joined: 19 Jun 2007
Posts: 1179
Location: California
Tue Oct 06, 2020 7:35 am quote
Hey Chatis still encouraging the Allstate Trike.

1. Seen a lot of Vespa's restored using original fork bearing races. Unless damage maybe OK.

2. If you are changing the stator and flywheel for electronic and maintaining the electrical should be fine. The stator will provide the 2/3 wires needed for the CDI/ignition and also for the 12VAC for lighting. The loom wires and new 12v bulbs will see 12VAC instead of 6. Not sure if a battery is involved but could be probably.
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Tue Oct 06, 2020 4:59 pm quote
Today was a bodywork day…

This is what the tail looked like when received:


First to push it out and apply pressure before hammering.




There, I fixed it!!

Some tweaks to the legshield. Not quite finished.


And the front fender dent:


That's gone too.

I did polish the fender a little to see how the paint would come out. Will need work.

Next to work on the paint and patina. There are four or five places I am going to need to weld - a few cracks and some missing steel.

Having fun
Molto Verboso
62 VBB1T Round Tail W/ leaner sidecar
Joined: 26 Jan 2019
Posts: 1777
Location: california
Wed Oct 07, 2020 7:38 am quote
Very nice work.
Nice to see this thing coming back to life.
Can't wait to see what a little rubbing compound will do for the red.
Enjoying the ride.
-CM
Molto Verboso
2007 Stella 150
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 1112
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Wed Oct 07, 2020 8:11 am quote
How about truck bed liner in a matching red on the floor boards? Tough stuff and flexs.
Ossessionato
1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2284

Wed Oct 07, 2020 8:49 am quote
Nice work on getting the tail dent out. I would give the bearing races a very close inspection to see if there's any obvious wear, pitting or rust , if they look good I would simply get bearings.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 7949
Location: Victoria, Australia
Wed Oct 07, 2020 1:51 pm quote
Great project, although the trike is exciting.
Chatis wrote:
Also need to address the front end. If someone has a VBB fork they need to get rid of let me know.
What's wrong with your fork? Doesn't look bad to me.
Christopher_55934 wrote:
How about truck bed liner in a matching red on the floor boards? Tough stuff and flexs.
This is a good idea. You're not going to afford a great restoration while you're out of work... just do the minimum and make sure you're not doing stuff that will make it more difficult for a full resto later on.

Have a look at home plating for your hardware. There is also an impressive fix in the tips and tricks thread I recall.
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Wed Oct 07, 2020 5:14 pm quote
Ginch wrote:
What's wrong with your fork? Doesn't look bad to me.
I want to put a damper in. Some say the Stoffi (or Stoffi type) spring is as good as having the damper but I would prefer the damper. Unless something comes up it will have to be Stoffi.
Christopher_55934 wrote:
How about truck bed liner in a matching red on the floor boards? Tough stuff and flexs.
I am going to paint them properly with a single stage urethane that will be color matched to the mudguard. But, they have presented more challenges since after wire brushing there are some holes in the floor boards. Options are lead'ing, fiber glass, or cutting out the effected areas and welding in new steel.




As for the rust, I will be using Eastwood products. Internal, down the tunnel I will use Eastwood Internal Frame Coating Aerosol and then in the inside of the tub I will use Eastwood Rust Encapsulator Aerosol in Matte Red. On the floorboards, inside the mudguards and inside the cowls I will treat the metal and paint with primer and top coat.

This scooter has had a rough life. Putting it back together will be 'saving' it. But I have the time and I am learning how to do all this stuff which is a lot of fun.
Ginch wrote:
Have a look at home plating for your hardware. There is also an impressive fix in the tips and tricks thread I recall.
Will be looking into that with excitement.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 7949
Location: Victoria, Australia
Wed Oct 07, 2020 6:03 pm quote
Chatis wrote:
Ginch wrote:
Have a look at home plating for your hardware. There is also an impressive fix in the tips and tricks thread I recall.
Will be looking into that with excitement.
Here it is.

http://modernvespa.com/forum/post1678610#1678610
Ossessionato
1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2284

Wed Oct 07, 2020 9:48 pm quote
It’s hard to tell , but looking from here I think plug welding with a Mig welder would do the job for the holes.
Molto Verboso
bare metal cafe racer
Joined: 01 Sep 2017
Posts: 1031
Location: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Wed Oct 07, 2020 11:45 pm quote
If you are ninja with a welder then could plug those holes. I know I would blow bigger holes trying (without being able to back it with a heat sink). Ultimately the floor needs replacing for a ‘proper’ resto. And if you replace the floor then that leads to having to deal with the whole frame as it gets hard to blend that amount of welding in (i.e. hide it from inspectors).

And it appears the floor is actually solid. I’d consider using JB Weld on those holes. I’ve patched quite a few holes in my frame up with it and they all seem to be holding so far. Super quick way to sort them.
Addicted
'64 Motovespa 150S (177) , '66 Allstate SF, '64 VBB, '66 180SS
Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 737
Location: S.Salem, NY
Thu Oct 08, 2020 4:09 am quote
The problem is that what you are seeing is rust inside that has worked its way through. Most likely, the metal in that center area is very thin and if you try welding up the holes, you will be chasing them all over the place. The only way to really take care of that is to cut out the center and replace it. Unless you can somehow stop the rust inside, anything you put on the underside will probably fall off and holes will continue to appear elsewhere. You could try JBW or the like and then treat the inside with Ospho or something and hope for the best.
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Thu Oct 08, 2020 6:45 am quote
This scoot sat for a long time and was exposed to the elements. Your ideas are great. Thanks.

I sent my cell phone down the tunnel and there is surface rust on it but it appears to be solid in most places other than that section between the first and second cross brace. That must have been a low spot where the water sat!

I am going to cut that section out and replace it with a patch panel. I will try to press out the indents but if that distorts the steel too much it will just be a flat patch panel. That will also give me (limited) access to the tunnel so I can wire brush and treat the rest of it to stop any further rust.

The other two or three holes that are small will be plug welded. For this I understand that if you put brass behind the hole it makes it much easier to plug weld the hole.

Right now I am still committed to maintain the patina on all exposed areas of the scooter other than the floor. If the floor becomes a project were I have to change out the entire floor board I will rethink the maintaining the patina.

Top priority, the scooter must be safe to ride. Second priority, learn how to do all this stuff while having fun!
Ossessionato
Joined: 26 Oct 2015
Posts: 2678

Thu Oct 08, 2020 7:33 am quote
Before you go chasing around a bunch of rust on you scooter (that you'll never ever get all of it removed without a complete full immersion of a acid bath baptism), i'd spray a bunch of Purple Power down in it, then blast off the rust that's inside the tunnel with a 3500 psi pressure washer. It will remove most of the flakes and leave it squeaky clean for the next step... Let the frame dry completely, then tape off ALL the holes with duct tape. Pour a bunch of Ospho down in there and swish it around (in the gravel or dirt, not on a concrete pad!) Leave the Opsho in the tunnel for as long as you can (a few hours or so?). Then pour the rest of the Ospho out (and then pour paint down in there after the Ospho is good and dry). I wouldn't recommend sectioning any metal, welding any metal, epoxying any goop, leading, brazing, ect to keep your rust...i mean patina. Just leave it as is and ride the dang thing. If you actually wanted to restore the scooter, then you would need to replace the whole floor. But you made it clear you aren't interested in that (which is OK). I can't vouch for Easwood products, but most people here can vouch for Ospho.
Addicted
'64 Motovespa 150S (177) , '66 Allstate SF, '64 VBB, '66 180SS
Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 737
Location: S.Salem, NY
Thu Oct 08, 2020 7:38 am quote
Yes, a copper or brass backing will absolutely make this easier. Otherwise you end up filling the space with mig wire. This works because you can't weld brass or copper ( with a mig) so the welds don't stick. The trouble with welding thin rusty sheet metal is that the arc will basically vaporize it and you will be chasing the edge of the hole until you get to more solid material. You could use flat sheet and form and add the ribs on top of it. I'd cut it just inside the tunnel flange first and then trim it to just inside the spot welds so it just overlaps the flange. Chances are, there is also rust between the tunnel flange and the floor as well but because the tunnel is a heavier gauge than the floor (or the body), at least you'd have some heavier material to weld to.
Good luck !
Addicted
'64 Motovespa 150S (177) , '66 Allstate SF, '64 VBB, '66 180SS
Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 737
Location: S.Salem, NY
Thu Oct 08, 2020 7:47 am quote
I second whodat's advice. This is what I did to the 1809SS I just got. Putting off cutting and welding for later if I ever decide to re-do the whole frame. I have some pin holes at the very rear of the floor but it was pretty flaky in there so I know the center section would have to be cut out.
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Thu Oct 08, 2020 1:00 pm quote
Thanks again guys, but as I said I am in no rush to get this done. I also want to learn, so doing this bodywork is part of my objective. Cutting, welding, grinding, treating, painting....

I have three other scooters that I ride (not all that frequently unfortunately).



Onward...
Molto Verboso
2007 Stella 150
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 1112
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Thu Oct 08, 2020 2:54 pm quote
Chatis wrote:
Thanks again guys, but as I said I am in no rush to get this done. I also want to learn, so doing this bodywork is part of my objective. Cutting, welding, grinding, treating, painting....

I have three other scooters that I ride (not all that frequently unfortunately).



Onward...
Is the red one lowered? Looking at how far the tire goes into the front fender compared to the other 2, I like it better. I have been eyeing a wide tire kit with taller tires, or maybe a 11" wheel with a taller tire.
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Thu Oct 08, 2020 5:01 pm quote
Christopher_55934 wrote:
Is the red one lowered?
The red one is a 63 VBB with a LML motor and a 10" Wheels. Not lowered. I have rebuilt it and customized it with a very Italian theme. The body however is as I got it, with a few bumps and bruises from the years.
Molto Verboso
bare metal cafe racer
Joined: 01 Sep 2017
Posts: 1031
Location: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Fri Oct 09, 2020 10:18 am quote
Chatis wrote:
Thanks again guys, but as I said I am in no rush to get this done. I also want to learn, so doing this bodywork is part of my objective. Cutting, welding, grinding, treating, painting....

I have three other scooters that I ride (not all that frequently unfortunately).



Onward...
You are almost exactly where I was at one point... looking at a rat with a rusty floor, wanting to keep it rat tho. I ended up putting a new floor on. Then falling for the look of the bare metal/ phosphate coat when I got it dipped. Kinda kept it rat in a way. But yeah... the floor ultimately led me down a different path.

The reason peeps probably know Ospho more than the Eastwood products is they are pretty pricey options. The hard core rodders use that solution for inside frames so guessing it works well. But Penetrol also works well... just might need to repeat it at some point. Ospho first then Penetrol is a good idea.

I’d figure exactly what you want to get out of the resto. If it is body work skills then go for it. I’d flag trying to press the sheet unless you got some wicked tools setup tho.

If your main goal is keep it rat then know that you will likely need to keep doing body maintenance and it will be an evolving look. The two goals go well together - but I’d go for solutions that are cheap, quick and easy rather than the bestest correct way for a complete resto.

Many ratters chase trying to 100% lock the look in, trying to coat/seal everything (myself included).

Much more liberating to let go and embrace the rat vibe fully. Suddenly dents, scrapes, patches, rust.... it all adds character. And honestly anyone who looks at it doesn’t even realise that they aren’t ‘meant’ to be there.

You obviously know your way around a scoot (or three). Going to enjoy watching this resto whatever direction it goes.
Style Maven
74 50s x3 78 P200 84 Cosa PK50XL2 58 AllState 68 Sprint 80 50special '66(?) Super125
Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 7879
Location: seattle/athens
Fri Oct 09, 2020 5:01 pm quote
I really like the look of your bike!
whodatschrome wrote:
Before you go chasing around a bunch of rust on you scooter (that you'll never ever get all of it removed without a complete full immersion of a acid bath baptism), i'd spray a bunch of Purple Power down in it, then blast off the rust that's inside the tunnel with a 3500 psi pressure washer. It will remove most of the flakes and leave it squeaky clean for the next step... Let the frame dry completely, then tape off ALL the holes with duct tape. Pour a bunch of Ospho down in there and swish it around (in the gravel or dirt, not on a concrete pad!) Leave the Opsho in the tunnel for as long as you can (a few hours or so?). Then pour the rest of the Ospho out (and then pour paint down in there after the Ospho is good and dry). I wouldn't recommend sectioning any metal, welding any metal, epoxying any goop, leading, brazing, ect to keep your rust...i mean patina. Just leave it as is and ride the dang thing. If you actually wanted to restore the scooter, then you would need to replace the whole floor. But you made it clear you aren't interested in that (which is OK). I can't vouch for Easwood products, but most people here can vouch for Ospho.
Given your likely budget, this appeals to me. You just need to insure it's sealed off well to keep water out
Chatis wrote:
Thanks again guys, but as I said I am in no rush to get this done. I also want to learn, so doing this bodywork is part of my objective. Cutting, welding, grinding, treating, painting....

...
Onward...
But given that you made your own engine stand and edge crimper, maybe consider a small upgrade that shouldn't cost more than ten bucks or so? If it was mine I'd cut out that section with most of the rot and carefully fit in a 16ga plate welded to the still solid rib edges across and to where the frame flange gives plenty to weld to along the sides per the sketch.

LOTS of cutting, welding and grinding but not where you need to worry about appearance so much except you lose the original reinforcing "X" embossed there, but gain the strength of about triple the original thickness. Wouldn't be able to tell from above. Also gives you access to inspect and rustproof in the tunnel better.

rot.jpg

Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Sun Oct 11, 2020 8:12 am quote
V oodoo wrote:
If it was mine I'd cut out that section with most of the rot and carefully fit in a 16ga plate welded to the still solid rib edges across and to where the frame flange gives plenty to weld to along the sides per the sketch.
Yes, my plan exactly. Except I am going to try to press out the X first. If it fails I will go to a flat sheet.
V oodoo wrote:
Also gives you access to inspect and rustproof in the tunnel better.
Exactly what I am planning on doing.

I have needed to leave town for a while. Updates when I get back.
Member
1963 Vespa VBB, 1965 Allstate Cruisaire, 1974 Vespa Super, 2003 Stella 2T
Joined: 31 Jan 2016
Posts: 49
Location: Kansas City
Wed Oct 14, 2020 6:47 am quote
While I am where I am I have been thinking. Interested to hear your thoughts on these ideas:

- I am going to remove the rotted steel from the tunnel ala V oodoo but instead of welding new steel I am thinking about framing the opening with ¼” bar, plug welding the frame (and seal welding the edges) and then adding on a removable panel. If I could get my spot welder in there that would also be an option. The frame would be stronger than the plate. I would put captive nuts on the frame, or drill and tap, to secure the plate with screws. Obviously would put some sort of gasket. see below

- Going to run a cable for a head temp and tack down the frame. I am thinking about making new holes with grommets, one out the column opposite side to the steering lock and one engine side.

- Going to run a sub harness engine side to glove box with four wires. Going to add two wires to the existing harness to run from engine to headset, just in case. Harness is in surprisingly good condition.

access hatch.jpg
Access Hatch

Member
Joined: 02 Oct 2019
Posts: 31
Location: RI
Wed Oct 14, 2020 1:44 pm quote
It sounds like something you want to do more than something you need to do. I can't imagine using an access panel there. And if I did want the access, I'd want it under the floor mat, not under the floor. Seems especially superfluous if you're leaving two extra runs in there.

But, hey, if you got the itch, might as well scratch it.

A note on those gauges. I have a cheap-o® CHT/RMP digital readout thing. Temperature was helpful for trivia and troubleshooting, and it's still fixed (wire runs under floormat), but now I'm done with it and I want it off. It'll be easy to remove. And if my cylinder is running hot, odds are that I'll feel it before I see it on the gauge. I don't need a tach at all. I can hear the RPMs perfectly well, and until I'm troubleshooting, I don't need to know the exactish number. I barely check the speedo much less anything else.

YMMV
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