Vespa hub studs
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Enthusiast
'81 Vespa P200e, '93 Vespa PX125e
Joined: 11 Jun 2020
Posts: 60
Location: St. Catharines, Ontario
Thu Nov 19, 2020 5:33 am quote
Anyone every remove or replace these?

I know they are a replaceable part. Everyone just replace one or two bolts on a rim?

I have a brand new rim with a misthreaded stud and I would rather replace the stud than they whole rim.

Any input is appreciated.
N
Molto Verboso
Vespas 1964 GS160, 1965 SS180, 1977 V9A1T, 1983 PX150E
Joined: 16 Apr 2011
Posts: 1547
Location: Siam
Thu Nov 19, 2020 5:44 am quote
I had a hub that had a regular hex head bolt bodged into it. I took it out, had the hole welded up, a new hole drilled, and then tapped threads for a proper stud. Drilling the hole correctly is critical. Itís easily messed up even if itís off a bit. Have a machine shop with a drill press and proper measuring tools to get it right.

If the hole you have is ok, you can remove the stud with a stud remover or a hack job with a Visegrip.

So, yes, it can be done.
Enthusiast
'81 Vespa P200e, '93 Vespa PX125e
Joined: 11 Jun 2020
Posts: 60
Location: St. Catharines, Ontario
Thu Nov 19, 2020 5:55 am quote
So really itís not as easy it would seem.
Molto Verboso
Vespas 1964 GS160, 1965 SS180, 1977 V9A1T, 1983 PX150E
Joined: 16 Apr 2011
Posts: 1547
Location: Siam
Thu Nov 19, 2020 6:21 am quote
It could difficult getting the old stud out. SIP sells a special tool to remove them, but Iíve never used it.

Mine was easy to get out because it had a hardware hex head bolt, which is not original. The problem was that it had an oversized hole. Thatís why I went through the trouble of having it welded, drilled, and tapped.

If the hole had been ok, I would have just put in a proper stud.
Banned
2:6
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 7619
Location: San Francisco
Thu Nov 19, 2020 6:48 am quote
the back side of the studs are flared out from the factory to keep them from coming out. If you try and remove them without drilling out that flare it will just rip up the existing threads.

so, not really easy but it can be done.
Molto Verboso
2007 Stella 150
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 1258
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Thu Nov 19, 2020 8:17 am quote
I replaced my rear studs, I wanted to use flanged locknuts. I was able to turn my studs in a turn so the flare stuck out some and ground it off. The screws went in no problem.
Hooked
58 VB1T, 68 SS180, 81 100 Sport
Joined: 06 May 2019
Posts: 443
Location: Long Beach, CA
Thu Nov 19, 2020 10:59 am quote
This is the way ^^^^^^^

For proper OEM look, use studs; but longer than the factory.
If not concerned about it being factory, you can use Button head hex bolts; which will add some security with the bolt head on the backside. Either way, use longer ones and Red Locktite.

Also, heat can be you're friend for loosening those factory studs! Just like heating the case to pull bearings.

Good luck!
Christopher_55934 wrote:
I replaced my rear studs, I wanted to use flanged locknuts. I was able to turn my studs in a turn so the flare stuck out some and ground it off. The screws went in no problem.
Molto Verboso
bare metal cafe racer
Joined: 01 Sep 2017
Posts: 1049
Location: Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Thu Nov 19, 2020 11:33 am quote
Probably irrelevant to the OP but FYI on stud bolts...

Those flanged ends just kiss part of my radial caliper. Or did... I let them work it out between them. Guessing that button caps would stick out a little bit further. And if I had longer stud bolts I wouldnít be able to seat or remove the wide tyre on the back (despite removing the exhaust, shock, and dropping the motor down as far it will go - which I have to do as standard).

The price you pay for custom mods...
Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and new to 2018, '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: 30 Nov 2011
Posts: 8014
Location: Victoria, Australia
Thu Nov 19, 2020 1:09 pm quote
Christopher_55934 wrote:
I replaced my rear studs, I wanted to use flanged locknuts. I was able to turn my studs in a turn so the flare stuck out some and ground it off. The screws went in no problem.
That's definitely the way to do it.
pheasant plucker wrote:
Guessing that button caps would stick out a little bit further.
Yes they do, and they hit the caliper.


There is a type of hub where the studs are not screwed and staked. They're staked, but pressed in or something. This was a fairly new hub as well... tried screwing them out but no go. So had a guy drill them out - I was a long way from home at the point. Holes ended up in the wrong spot.
Member
Joined: 02 Oct 2019
Posts: 38
Location: RI
Thu Nov 19, 2020 2:22 pm quote
Timely topic!

I overtightened a lug nut and pulled the stud through. Ultimately, after I realized what was happening, I pulled it all the way out and cleaned it up with a hacksaw and file. I can thread the stud back in, but it doesn't hold securely.

I put in a hex head bolt as a stop gap. It works well with the threads in the drum intact. I don't have the means to press in a new stud. I was thinking about trying JB Weld to see if that holds the stud in place.

I'm sure I'll end up replacing the hub, but in the meanwhile, bodge mode engage.
Molto Verboso
2007 Stella 150
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 1258
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Thu Nov 19, 2020 2:54 pm quote
jape wrote:
Timely topic!

I overtightened a lug nut and pulled the stud through. Ultimately, after I realized what was happening, I pulled it all the way out and cleaned it up with a hacksaw and file. I can thread the stud back in, but it doesn't hold securely.

I put in a hex head bolt as a stop gap. It works well with the threads in the drum intact. I don't have the means to press in a new stud. I was thinking about trying JB Weld to see if that holds the stud in place.

I'm sure I'll end up replacing the hub, but in the meanwhile, bodge mode engage.
The factory stud is thread not pressed in.
Member
Joined: 02 Oct 2019
Posts: 38
Location: RI
Thu Nov 19, 2020 3:31 pm quote
Christopher_55934 wrote:
jape wrote:
Timely topic!

I overtightened a lug nut and pulled the stud through. Ultimately, after I realized what was happening, I pulled it all the way out and cleaned it up with a hacksaw and file. I can thread the stud back in, but it doesn't hold securely.

I put in a hex head bolt as a stop gap. It works well with the threads in the drum intact. I don't have the means to press in a new stud. I was thinking about trying JB Weld to see if that holds the stud in place.

I'm sure I'll end up replacing the hub, but in the meanwhile, bodge mode engage.
The factory stud is thread not pressed in.
The back of the stud is peened over. I don't have a means to do that. How do you do it?
Molto Verboso
2007 Stella 150
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 1258
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Thu Nov 19, 2020 7:12 pm quote
I took the wheel off, then I was able to put two nuts on a stud locking them together. Then I was able to tighten the stud down another turn. That left the premed end sticking my out a little. Then I ground the end of the stud off with a rotary tool. Same thing as a Dremel just a different brand.
jape wrote:
Christopher_55934 wrote:
jape wrote:
Timely topic!

I overtightened a lug nut and pulled the stud through. Ultimately, after I realized what was happening, I pulled it all the way out and cleaned it up with a hacksaw and file. I can thread the stud back in, but it doesn't hold securely.

I put in a hex head bolt as a stop gap. It works well with the threads in the drum intact. I don't have the means to press in a new stud. I was thinking about trying JB Weld to see if that holds the stud in place.

I'm sure I'll end up replacing the hub, but in the meanwhile, bodge mode engage.
The factory stud is thread not pressed in.
The back of the stud is peened over. I don't have a means to do that. How do you do it?
Member
Joined: 02 Oct 2019
Posts: 38
Location: RI
Fri Nov 20, 2020 4:48 am quote
Christopher_55934 wrote:
I took the wheel off, then I was able to put two nuts on a stud locking them together. Then I was able to tighten the stud down another turn. That left the premed end sticking my out a little. Then I ground the end of the stud off with a rotary tool. Same thing as a Dremel just a different brand.
That sounds like a process for removing a stud -- you grind off the bit that is pressed/peened in. How have you installed a new one?
Molto Verboso
2007 Stella 150
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 1258
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Fri Nov 20, 2020 5:43 am quote
I'm not sure I understand the question. Can you post a picture of what problem your having exactly?

I didn't put studs back in, I used socket head cap screws, that were longer than original. I threaded the screws in from the back side, if your threads are good they screw in just like any standard screw.

As for putting in a new threaded stud. You can screw a new one in, just like screwing the old one out, after the peened over end is ground off. Everything is threaded, there nothing to press in anywhere. If you ripped a stud out of the hub and damaged the threads in the hub the only easy and correct way to fix it is to buy a new hub. The premed over end could be done with a center punch of some type.
jape wrote:
Christopher_55934 wrote:
I took the wheel off, then I was able to put two nuts on a stud locking them together. Then I was able to tighten the stud down another turn. That left the premed end sticking my out a little. Then I ground the end of the stud off with a rotary tool. Same thing as a Dremel just a different brand.
That sounds like a process for removing a stud -- you grind off the bit that is pressed/peened in. How have you installed a new one?
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