[NSR] How are your houses made?
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Location: Latina (Italy)
Sat Feb 20, 2021 8:30 am quote
And I also understand the fixtures, doors, bathrooms, electrical and plumbing systems, room layout, etc.
Molto Verboso
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Joined: 12 Dec 2017
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Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Sat Feb 20, 2021 10:07 am quote
In South Africa, clay and coal deposits are plentiful, so most homes are built of kiln-fired brick and cement mortar. In areas where clay is not so plentiful (such as on the piedmont areas along the coast, the use of cement bricks and blocks is plentiful. Facebricks are popular, but are getting more expensive due to energy cost. Where brick walls are rendered, cement-sand plaster is used and painted to improve weather resistance.

Roof construction in houses is normally timber - South African Pine. Here we find one of the drawbacks of our sunny weather - trees grow too rapidly. The annular rings are wide and the total strength of the wood produced is lower than wood grown in countries with less sunshine where annual rings are narrower.

Roofs are covered with a choice of materials. Concrete roof tiles are very common for economic reasons. Metal sheets used to be cheap but have become comparatively expensive now. Roofs that are covered with grass or reed thatching are valued from a traditional cultural perspective.

Traditional African housing ia varied as it uses locally available materials. Roofing is mostly done in thatching, using a delicate framework of thin saplings, tied together with woven grass binding. Walls may also be built using localstone or sun-dried clay bricks with clay mortar and plaster, usually mixed with cattle dung for fibre strength. Wattle-and-daub is also widespread where locally available.
(Google African Vernacular architecture for a better look!)

City apartments and houses are First-World level - on a par with the current trends and standards in Europe, UK or USA. Concrete and steel with large glass windows are currently fashionable for wealthy clients.

South Africa imports a lot of finishing materials - marble, porcelain tiles, stainless steel and aluminum. Most of the appliances are imported with European and Koreas makes the most popular. US appliances such as washing machines and tumble driers are popular for commercial use.

Most electrical and plumbing fittings are imported or locally produced to E-mark standards, but a lot of Chinese plumbing is now being used due to lower costs.

As for layouts, houses are really varied. My own home was designed with an open plan living-dining-kitchen and separate laundry-scullery. Bedrooms are grouped off a passage in a separate block of rooms connected with a single door for security. Bathrooms also lead off the passage and more expensive houses will also have and en suite bathroom leading off the main bedroom. In my case, when the family grew and we needed extra space, I added a main bedroom suite connected to the family living space by a single door on the far end of the house.

South Africans are casual and informal. They prefer simplicity and natural materials in their living environments. Rural housing will contain a high level of logs and thatching, often mixed in with large glassed areas to make full use of the beautiful vistas. Swimming pools are very popular to cool off in the warm climatic areas.

On the negative side, increasing crime has resulted in most South African turning their homes into security enclosures with electric fences, bars on windows and doors with alarms and armed response service providers. Good design will use the form of the building to provide restricted intrusion points and homes are grouped into secure clusters with high-tech security technology. Secured, closed communities are also very popular now, often grouped to surround a golf course.
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Sat Feb 20, 2021 10:33 am quote
Here in uk mainly bricks and mortar with either slate or roof tile can be cement based, in rural areas quite often sandstone blocks with stone roofs, we have a lot of high rise in cities which are mainly concrete. We do have some timber framed very early houses Tudor period which have oak frames and wattle and daub infill, our older houses depended on what was available in the areas so if clay was plentiful bricks, if quarry’s nearby stone in east Anglia they used a lot of flint in the buildings
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Sat Feb 20, 2021 10:49 am quote
Elder son's UK house - 15th century. Built from second-hand ships' timbers with rubble and lime-mortar infill. It was three cottages for monks - now with modern extensions around the back. Picture taken a couple of weeks ago.

snow.jpg

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The Hornet (GT200, aka Love Bug) and 'Dimples' - a GTS 300
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Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Sat Feb 20, 2021 11:00 am quote
Here in CA nearly all single-family dwellings are built from timber, with a concrete slab foundation. Stucco over sheathing on the outside, drywall inside.
Roofing used to be wood shingles, but these days that is rapidly being replaced with bitumen 'shingles' for fire precaution reasons.

Even large multi-storey buildings can be entirely constructed of timber.

Domestic electricity supply is 230V centre-tapped to 115V. Large appliances get the 230V, everything else under 1500W is 115V.

Plumbing is usually copper, though PEX is becoming more common, especially for re-plumbing older properties, as it's cheap, easy to install and fairly freeze-tolerant.

DSC02418.JPG



Last edited by jimc on Sat Feb 20, 2021 11:03 am; edited 1 time in total
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200L Grandturismo
Joined: 13 Sep 2020
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Location: Bay of Fundy
Sat Feb 20, 2021 11:01 am quote
Here in Maritime Canada we're dealing with a wide range of seasonal conditions, and the construction of our homes reflects this. Lumber is cheap and plentiful; a lot of it originates here.

Older [where I live, that means constructed the wake of the Great Fire of 1877] in the city centre are brick and stone. Brick Victorian-era homes in our Uptown are in high demand, and the prices they command support investment in restoration and systems upgrades.

But post-WWII residential construction is almost always 2x4 or 2x6 timber construction over a concrete basement foundation, with asphalt shingle roofing. Brick or stone cladding is relatively rare. Vinyl siding is, unfortunately, prevalent. Noisy in the wind, too. Cedar siding is, I think, a better choice, and not uncommon.

Double or triple glazed windows, Tyvek housewraps, gap filling foam, and high R-value insulation can make a big different in comfort over unrestored older homes. And a difference in operating cost, too.

Heating systems vary. There's are oil, electric, and natural gas options. Some of us burn wood. Our house is large and not especially efficient, but upgraded insulation and windows means we heat through a Canadian winter on less than two cords of wood each year. Plus, woodstoves are just plain enjoyable.

There's no real need for air-conditioning here. I'll leave it at that.
Grumpy Biker
1980 Vespa P200e (sold), 2002 Vespa ET4 (sold), 1949 Harley-Davidson FL
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Location: Chandler, Arizona, USA
Sat Feb 20, 2021 4:24 pm quote
Here in the desert Southwest USA houses are typically timber framed with stucco exterior walls and clay or concrete tile roofs. Electrical and plumbing is as Jimc described (new construction is almost 100% Pex plumbing). Foundations are mostly post-tentioned concrete slab.

Here is my wife on the left and her client doing a framing inspection on a new build just yesterday.

D24C7774-3401-4D78-AECE-9A531A8FF74B.jpeg

89FEEFA0-2B96-4DFF-AD58-987DA4A31E62.jpeg
Stucco exterior with concrete tile roof

Ossessionato
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Sat Feb 20, 2021 7:23 pm quote
After WWII many if not most homes were built of concrete block on slab. My home, built in '71 is of that type, with 2x4 (sometimes even less) walls. Thousands of such homes were built like mine. Later, in the 70's builders changed to frame construction.

In the 70s one builder would build a house in a day. They started with a slab and stubbed electrical and plumbing. 19 to 24 hours later, a TV station showed a family moving in. Quite the show.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Sun Feb 21, 2021 3:41 am quote
Houses in Italy are very different both for the construction area and for the time period. I will not talk about large palaces or public housing constructions ...
Excluding those built before 1960, a period in which there was still a poor economy in Italy, I will refer to individual private homes.
Premise: in the years from 1995 to 2005 I worked as a technical collaborator for architectural firms due to my knowledge of CAD programs and my experience as a designer in various fields (first mechanics and then furniture in wood and various materials).
Here the houses were generally built from 1960 to 1980 using materials such as hollow bricks or tuff blocks; lately there have been problems with tuff because it was discovered that it could incorporate small pockets of radon gas (it is a volcanic material).
From 1980 onwards construction began with anti-seismic and heat conservation criteria but the problem has always been costs, so many houses have been built with irregularities with respect to the project and many others are abusive, built without design calculations or with waste materials, beautiful to look at but fragile. Even worse without geological studies, which is fundamental in a country like Italy, and therefore when there are climatic or geological events many collapse easily ...
My house, 180 square meters of surface designed and built in 2008, is based on all the most modern design criteria and is built with the most modern materials while respecting part of the Mediterranean style.
The ground has a large limestone rock formation two meters deep, on which the foundations rest: a perimeter wall in reinforced concrete 25 centimeters wide and one meter high.
Inside the perimeter there are 24 columns of 25 centimeters by 50 centimeters which also rest on the rocky layer, all enclosed in a base floor in reinforced concrete 40 centimeters thick. Prior to the pouring of concrete, the main sewer pipes (in PVC with a diameter of 14 cm) were positioned.
Another floor (I don't know the technical term but like the floor of the base ...) was poured in concrete to form the ceiling.
The external walls are in Poroton (two ... external 20 cm Poroton, 10 cm insulating layer, internal 10 cm Poroton). The dividing walls of the internal rooms are also made of 10 cm Poroton.
http://www.poroton.it/
The whole is plastered with a handmade material consisting of a premix with the addition of pozzolan and a pinch of plaster to give tone (Italian masons are also a little cooks ...).
The floors are in cooking tiles (cotto di Siena https://www.maestridelcotto.it/it/catalogo/cotto-per-interni-p1)
The roof is in Italian tiles and the gutters are completely in copper.
The windows are made of aluminum with internal wooden frames in thermal function and double-layer glass. Each window is coupled with armored shutters and the bedrooms also have an anti-theft grate.
The house is equipped with an alarm system with perimeter sensors that detect intrusions at a distance of 15 meters from the house.
The interior doors are in veneered MDF and the main doors are armored with a look in wood like.
The bathroom (two) consists of a sink, a toilet, a bidet (inevitable!) And a shower; in one bathroom there is a washing machine and in the other bathroom there is the ... "birroccio" (hand wash linen). The washed laundry is hung out to dry outside or if it rains in a dedicated room inside the house. I know that in the US people use the dryer but here we have some habits that progress is up against.
The plumbing (in PVC) and heating systems (in insulated copper) are placed under the floors before they are installed; under each window there is an aluminum radiator and there are two water heating units: an LPG boiler and a 32,000 Kcal pellet stove (main unit) which also produces sanitary water. In the summer, a 200-liter solar panel is used and an electronically controlled three-way distribution valve provides automatic sorting. Four flues are present, one for each heat source (... even the two kitchen hoods). The electrical system is all 220 volts with various life-saving safety devices; in addition there is a 4.7 kW photovoltaic system whose excess current is fed into the public grid and paid for through a contract with a special meter. With this system many private individuals produce clean energy at low cost and save.
The house also has an autonomous waste water disposal system with rotary purifier and oxygenator,the drain is environmental dispersion. The residual sludge is removed every five years by a specialized and certified company.
Behind the house there is a smaller cottage / garage (100 sqm.) But built with the same criteria. It is all built on one level, there is no cellar and there is no under roof.

Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Sun Feb 21, 2021 6:42 am quote
My flat right now is brick and mortar with shingles on the roof. The one I was born in in Brasil it was clay tiles on the roof.
Hooked
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Sun Feb 21, 2021 8:12 am quote
houses
That is a beautiful house Attila, can I come for a visit?
I built my current house 3 years ago. Concrete slab for basement floor. Cement block walls reinforced with concrete in the cores because the basement wall needed to be 16' tall to accommodate the slope of the land. The we framed the floor using 24' x 24" tall LVL's for beams to carry the floor joists so I would not need any interior supports in my garage/basement. Makes the space much more usable for my Buick, Dodge P/U, Vespa, Yamaha Majesty with almost 80,000 miles on the clock and an almost new China dual sport. There is a full bath and all frame walls are insulated and sheetrocked. The exposed block wall are painted with water proof paint,. there is a drop ceiling with led lighting.
The house is 2,000 sq. ft. so almost the same size as yours. All main floor wall are 2x4 frame with osb exterior covered with (ugh) vinyl siding. My living room is 20'x30' with front door on one end and 6' french door opens to the 16'x20' covered porch with screens. I have 2 bedrooms, 1 office 2 full baths on the main floor. Of course a kitchen, dining room. Most heat is via a wood burning stove. a heat pump supplies heat and air conditioning which is a must in southern US.

How do I downsize my pics so they will be acceptable here?

IMG_20200809_172031.jpg
Homemade house, not store bought
This is the drawing I use when I started framing this house.



Last edited by tonymarchman on Sun Feb 21, 2021 8:41 am; edited 1 time in total
Hooked
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Location: Long Beach, CA
Sun Feb 21, 2021 8:34 am quote
jimc wrote:
Here in CA nearly all single-family dwellings are built from timber, with a concrete slab foundation. Stucco over sheathing on the outside, drywall inside.
Roofing used to be wood shingles, but these days that is rapidly being replaced with bitumen 'shingles' for fire precaution reasons.
Older homes in my CA neighborhood are stucco (like most homes here), but the stucco is not applied to sheathing. The wood frame of the house is wrapped in tar paper, then chicken wire. The stucco is then applied. I don't really like it, but my house is 80 years old and there haven't been any problems and has survived numerous earthquakes.
Molto Verboso
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Sun Feb 21, 2021 8:53 am quote
Well our house is built from wood, 2X6 studs on 24 inch centers. Trusses for holding up the roof which is 1/2 plywood sheathing with asphalt shingles.

All but the 16 foot extension put on around 15 years back has a full cement block basement which has been studded up 2X4 walls inside of the cement blocks with fiberglass insulation with poly vapor barrier between the insulation and the block foundation.

Heat is 90% from wood burning stoves, one on main floor and one in semi-finished basement. The two full baths have in floor electric heat under tile floor. The rest of the house has electric baseboard heat for the time we are not home or the wood stove would actually be too much.

Water supply is combination of well and a cistern that collects rain water off roof. As the well water is from a well drilled in limestone bead rock it is to say the least a bit on the hard side. So the rain water collected off the roof being nice and soft the plumbing is set up to where the hot water heaters, one tank type for original part of the house and one tankless for addition with second bath. Both those run off the cistern/rain water. However by opening or closing a valve or two we can run 100% on either well or cistern water if one of them does have a problem of supply or pump failure.

Also have a portable 10,000 generator that with simply throwing a main breaker and plugging into a 220 volt outlet in detached garage we can keep things going the few times we have lost power from the electric company!
Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Sun Feb 21, 2021 11:25 am quote
Here in the Northwest US, most houses are wood frame with composition roofing. Cedar exterior siding used to be popular but composite cement siding such as Hardieplank has largely taken its place. The interior is usually finished with drywall. Concrete slabs or foundations are the norm. Insulation level has increased in recent years as has almost universal use of double or triple glazing. As probably everywhere else, the cost of construction has risen rapidly in recent years.
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Location: south Texas
Sun Feb 21, 2021 12:23 pm quote
I live in a van down by the river.

It's a joke. For Atilla: that is a line from the late comedian Chris Farley playing a motivational speaker on the TV show Saturday Night Live. It loses some of the funny when I have to explain it.

In sub-tropical south Texas, most of the homes on our island are timber framed with vinyl-clad siding (resists the salt weathering better than painted clapboard). Our house was designed with an area under the house that will allow water to flow through in case of flooding (tidal/storm surge during a hurricane). In order to be able to purchase wind (hurricane) insurance, buildings have to be constructed to Texas Department of Insurance specifications... essentially built to withstand 120mph winds. We are at the highest point on our island: 7 feet above the sea wall, which is generally about 4' above mean sea level.

Newer construction is now concrete block solid foundation, without any means of water to flow through. Different times, different construction techniques.
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The Hornet (GT200, aka Love Bug) and 'Dimples' - a GTS 300
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Sun Feb 21, 2021 1:15 pm quote
And in Holland they have houses that can float...

https://psmag.com/environment/are-the-floating-houses-of-the-netherlands-a-solution-against-the-rising-seas

Many huge cities around the world are in serious danger over the next fifty years or so.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Sun Feb 21, 2021 3:17 pm quote
Meanwhile somewhere in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Santa-Marta-Favela-Painti-001.jpg

Veni, Vidi, Posti
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Sun Feb 21, 2021 11:00 pm quote
Max... It should be problematic to track down a fault in the electricity grid but I wonder how the sewage disposal systems work ...
Sergeant at Arms
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Mon Feb 22, 2021 5:14 am quote
my house is made by me!



where there once was a garage and a breezeway...

*snaps fingers*



add some of this:


then you're here-




then a little later:


get a little of this for good measure-


and then you're almost there!


i busted the original slab and roughed out the plumbing. then framed it out and called in on the pour and rocked out the finish work. from there my brother and i did everything except the shingles on the roof, the gutters and the countertops. yes, full tilt custom cabinets. i built the door from reclaimed wood. the "farmhouse sink" is a repurposed acid dip tank. the tile was a total whore, but it's straight and level. all of the trim on the doors and windows is full custom and hand built by my brother and myself. everything from the wiring, to the insulation to the sheetrock to the paint was just the two of us.

but, slab on grade, 2X6 uprights, hip roof to match the rest of the house along with highlight windows on the front and casement windows on the side.

you build it once. you build it right. if you're adding on, make it flow. you don't want it looking like a lump on a sore dick.

-g
Hooked
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Mon Feb 22, 2021 6:45 am quote
My house was built haphazardly.

The original structure was built in 1947 or 1948 (I can't remember exactly). It was originally built as a Seventh Day Adventist church. It has a slab foundation, and is a wood frame structure with brick outer walls and plaster inner walls. It is divided into a kitchen, large L-shaped living room, small bedroom, small office (can't be classified as a bedroom because it doesn't have a closet or its own door), and a bathroom. The floor of the living room is the slab foundation, which we've painted brown. We are planning on eventually having a subfloor installed and put in laminate flooring. The bedroom, office, bathroom, & kitchen all have subfloors. The bedroom, office, and hall between them have laminate flooring, while the bathroom and kitchen have vinyl tile. The kitchen is in sore need of a remodel.

The rest of the house is all additions that were built in subsequent years. The first was originally a garage. It may have been built at the same time as the main house. It is concrete slab foundation with wood frame and wood siding. The interior walls are a mixture of unfinished and painted plywood.

I don't know the date of the additions, but I can guess at the timeline. First, they connected the original garage to the house. This addition has a concrete slab foundation with wood flooring on top, no subfloor. Then they extended that connection towards the front and back. These additions have concrete slab foundations with what appears to be a plaster coating on top. They are at slightly different levels from the center portion. The interior walls are a mixture of the exterior walls of the other structures (brick from the main structure on the south), floor to ceiling windows (on the east & west sides), or painted plywood (to the north). Next, they added a two car garage onto the front of the old one. Concrete slab, with full-width overhead garage door, and the sides are floor to ceiling windows. The back wall is the exterior of the original structure. At this time, they also added an extension off the back of the old garage. It is 18'x18' (5.5m x 5.5m), with a concrete slab foundation that we installed laminate flooring on top. It is the main bedroom, and has a 9'x9' (2.75m x 2.75m) bathroom in the corner. The exterior walls are wood (to the north) and floor to ceiling windows (to the west & south). The interior walls are drywall.

Based on things we've had to update, I get the impression that the previous owner(s) either did the work themselves, or hired their friends (or friends of friends) to do the work. Some of it was to code, some of it seems sketchy.

This is in stark contrast to the house my grandfather built in Wisconsin in the 1950s. He did almost all the work himself (he was a carpenter and painter). From what I'm told, the only thing he didn't do was the plumbing, because he hated plumbing. He sourced the framing timbers from an elementary school that had had a catastrophic fire. I'm told that the framing timbers in the attic have scorch marks on them from the fire. Instead of having a square/rectangle shaped bathroom, he built it with a diagonal wall between it and the dining area, because he hated having cramped bathrooms.

My dad told me that when he was a child, before they built the house, they'd been evicted from the rent house they'd been living in. My grandpa bought two plots of land on the edge of town, and moved his family (grandpa, grandma, my aunt & my dad) into a small travel trailer that he'd parked on the back of the lot. He then built a small house on the left edge of the lot. It had two small bedrooms (one for him and my grandma, the other for my dad & aunt), a small kitchen, a toilet in a closet, and a large living room. They then moved into it. My dad remembers my grandpa had measured all of their furniture and then laid it out on paper to make sure everything fit.

Then, he started on the house. It has a full basement, and wood frame. Once the house was complete, they moved everything into it. He then removed the front wall of the living room, and replaced it with a garage door, and parked his car inside. He'd made sure that the living room was just large enough to fit his car. He then had a workspace in the garage, as well as in the basement, and two decent size storage rooms in the garage.

He built it so well that when there was an explosion at the creamery across the street, the only damage to the house was a few cracked window panes. This compared to the houses around her that were moved on their foundations, or had other structural damage. (That article has quotes from my grandma and aunt.)

616BoosterBlvd.jpg
the house my Grandpa built

Veni, Vidi, Posti
Lx 50 4T (totaled), GTS 250, S 150 (Missing in KS), Something Chinese, GT 200 (sold)
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Mon Feb 22, 2021 7:05 am quote
Attila wrote:
Max... It should be problematic to track down a fault in the electricity grid but I wonder how the sewage disposal systems work ...
True but the view makes up for it.

Screenshot_20210222-090405_Chrome.jpg

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Mon Feb 22, 2021 7:20 am quote
New construction
A friend built a house some years back, and used ICF (insulated concrete forms) blocks, where the wall is built, braced, steel-reinforced, then filled with concrete. Pretty much any facing on the exterior you want, interiors usually drywall. The block include solid plastic strips that allow screwing framing or other materials directly to the block. Windows and doors are framed with lumber before the concrete is added. Usually a conventional pre-constructed truss roof.

Seems to offer the benefit of both insulation, from the foam plastic, and thermal mass, from the interior concrete. Tends to even out temp swings, day to night, reducing heating/cooling costs. So very little air infiltration that he ended up adding a heat-exchanging air unit in order to get fresh air in. Pretty tornado-proof as well. He claims to spend very little heating and cooling it.

If I was building now, that's what I'd use. Evidently somewhat of a trick to get the concrete to completely fill the interior cavity, with the rebar added, and you can only fill them a couple of feet at a time, allowing the concrete to set in between 'pours', otherwise the hydrodynamic pressure can 'blow out' the block on the bottom.

I live in an early 20th century house, conventional timber frame, cedar lap siding, plaster interior walls. Added insulation, replaced aluminum combinations with wood storm windows. Very energy efficient compared to original, but not as air-tight as I would like.
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Mon Feb 22, 2021 10:21 am quote
Sidehall Colonial
I love this off topic thread! They broke ground on my house in 1929, finished in 1931. Aluminum siding, walls made of plaster (good old days), steam radiator heat heated by oil, siding is aluminum, with basement and crawl space for attic. Guessing the foundation is concrete but what it looks like down there. I know that my house is very typical of the houses built in my area at that time. I grew up a couple of towns over and there are a lot of stylistic similarities. I can tell you Attila that houses built then and houses built now are not of the same materials in most cases. My house has what they call here "good bones" meaning a good sturdy structure. My favorite part of it though, is no upstairs or downstairs neighbors. We just bought it in December '20. Still a work in progress but we've done a lot already and mostly ourselves.

IMG-4414.JPG
Outside.

Hooked
2003 Vespa ET2
Joined: 05 Apr 2019
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Location: Cambridge, MA
Mon Feb 22, 2021 10:58 am quote
Greasy - are those your "helpers" or just nosy neighbors ?

my house was "built" in 1854...well thats when a brick foundation was laid..then a 1750-1770's workmans cottage was slid along the frozen charles river, and plopped on the foundation. An addition was added to the cottage at the time it was "plopped". The colonial cottage is made from odd sized ships timbers, possibly from across the pond and seems to have been built by a shipwright. Its definitely showing its age and is inhabited by one ghost. The 1854 parts timbers appear to be milled and probably locally.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
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Location: Latina (Italy)
Mon Feb 22, 2021 12:33 pm quote
Re: Sidehall Colonial
Karlsbadd wrote:
I love this off topic thread!
Do you like the idea?
It seemed to me that every house is also a mirror of those who live there and then the difference in technologies due to different cultures that changes not only the aesthetics but also the function.
Those with technical interests have them 360 degrees and without wanting to violate the privacy of others, it is nice to know the place where the scooter dreams of each of us are born and live.
The thing that amazed me most is the much use of wood that is used for structures in the USA ... Also the use of light materials and flexible construction techniques. Fantastic!
Some houses that you put the photo of are also characteristic as style.
A note to Greasy ... The important thing is to have a place to return to every time, the appearance is decided by those who live there and the starting point is important that it is robust, the aesthetics can be changed over time but the structure no, but there's no picture of you (I don't even know your real name).
Thank you for letting us participate in a piece of your life.
PS: I took note of the reference of the "lump on a sore dick", very funny.
Ossessionato
GTS250
Joined: 16 Jan 2010
Posts: 3732
Location: Tempe, AZ
Mon Feb 22, 2021 12:44 pm quote
My parents had a home built of cedar logs that were stripped of bark outside, flat inside, with tongue and groove on top and bottom. Not big, but nice.

Last edited by Syd on Wed Feb 24, 2021 8:59 am; edited 1 time in total
Molto Verboso
2013 Vespa 300 Super, 2007 Burgman 400
Joined: 30 Mar 2014
Posts: 1969
Location: Minneapolis USA
Mon Feb 22, 2021 12:53 pm quote
Homes in Minnesota
As you are aware from my posts, it can be cold in Minnesota.

Construction, full in ground block or poured cement basement to get
below the frost line. There are some on cement slab built homes - but
they tend to be cold. Most furnaces are natural gas force air stationed in
the basement and run heated and return sheet metal duct work.

On top of the basement, framed wood with insulated walls and sheet rock
finished interior and exterior walls covered with a variety of materials,
wood cedar, Aluminum, Vinyl, brick, stucco. Floors are hardwood, stone, or vinyl with at least 50% of flooring wall to wall carpet. Roof is composite tar shingles.

Many homes are all brick, but framed wood more affordable with the abundance of available wood. My house has partial brick front of the house with cedar on the other three sides for a colonial country look.

My scooters take up the third stall in the garage.

Bob Copeland
Minnesota

HOUSE ROAD VIEW.png
Fall - Ash tree blocking view.

Sergeant at Arms
Weird 80's Vespas & Cool Vintage Lambrettas
Joined: 21 Oct 2005
Posts: 8493
Location: The state of insanity, SoCal
Mon Feb 22, 2021 3:03 pm quote
jixaw wrote:
Greasy - are those your "helpers" or just nosy neighbors ?

my house was "built" in 1854...well thats when a brick foundation was laid..then a 1750-1770's workmans cottage was slid along the frozen charles river, and plopped on the foundation. An addition was added to the cottage at the time it was "plopped". The colonial cottage is made from odd sized ships timbers, possibly from across the pond and seems to have been built by a shipwright. Its definitely showing its age and is inhabited by one ghost. The 1854 parts timbers appear to be milled and probably locally.
nah, the meows are inspectors and they've unionized. there's actually four of them. so, yes, all of the concrete that has ever been poured around here will have little paw prints in it.

black cat has since shuffled off the mortal coil. he was the foreman of the kitty brigade and also my right hand. he'd be up on the roof when we were laying down the sheeting and rolling with the nail gun. ever see a cat climb a ladder? it's wild.

love the story of your house! that sounds awesome!

-g
Sergeant at Arms
Weird 80's Vespas & Cool Vintage Lambrettas
Joined: 21 Oct 2005
Posts: 8493
Location: The state of insanity, SoCal
Mon Feb 22, 2021 3:07 pm quote
Re: Sidehall Colonial
Karlsbadd wrote:
I love this off topic thread! They broke ground on my house in 1929, finished in 1931. Aluminum siding, walls made of plaster (good old days), steam radiator heat heated by oil, siding is aluminum, with basement and crawl space for attic. Guessing the foundation is concrete but what it looks like down there. I know that my house is very typical of the houses built in my area at that time. I grew up a couple of towns over and there are a lot of stylistic similarities. I can tell you Attila that houses built then and houses built now are not of the same materials in most cases. My house has what they call here "good bones" meaning a good sturdy structure. My favorite part of it though, is no upstairs or downstairs neighbors. We just bought it in December '20. Still a work in progress but we've done a lot already and mostly ourselves.
that is bitchin' looking!

congrats and welcome to homeownership. little pro tip: it's ALWAYS a work in progress and there's ALWAYS something to do, or needs fixing!

-g
Sergeant at Arms
Weird 80's Vespas & Cool Vintage Lambrettas
Joined: 21 Oct 2005
Posts: 8493
Location: The state of insanity, SoCal
Mon Feb 22, 2021 3:16 pm quote
Re: Homes in Minnesota
Bob Copeland wrote:
As you are aware from my posts, it can be cold in Minnesota.

Construction, full in ground block or poured cement basement to get
below the frost line. There are some on cement slab built homes - but
they tend to be cold. Most furnaces are natural gas force air stationed in
the basement and run heated and return sheet metal duct work.

On top of the basement, framed wood with insulated walls and sheet rock
finished interior and exterior walls covered with a variety of materials,
wood cedar, Aluminum, Vinyl, brick, stucco. Floors are hardwood, stone, or vinyl with at least 50% of flooring wall to wall carpet. Roof is composite tar shingles.

Many homes are all brick, but framed wood more affordable with the abundance of available wood. My house has partial brick front of the house with cedar on the other three sides for a colonial country look.

My scooters take up the third stall in the garage.

Bob Copeland
Minnesota
ASH!!!
*screams toward the heavens and shakes fists*

seriously the bane of my existence. i have a giant one right next to the shop that just dumps ass loads of leaves everywhere and mostly into the gutter. so then, obviously, i have to get out the big ladder that weighs a metric fuck ton and shuffle my ass up there and clean it all out. but then, of course, i can't just do one side, i have to both. and that's where a saturday afternoon goes missing.

i swear, i'm this ][ close to cutting that thing down.

-g
Moderaptor
The Hornet (GT200, aka Love Bug) and 'Dimples' - a GTS 300
Joined: 26 Aug 2007
Posts: 39332
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
Mon Feb 22, 2021 5:36 pm quote
I found a job lot of that otherwise stupidly expensive[1] gutter-filling foam on Nextdoor for practically ziltch. Instead of emptying the gutters twice a year, with cut hands and lots and LOTS of swearing, for the last four years I haven't had to touch them.

[1] $7 for 48" last time I looked. Out of my reach for ~200 feet of gutters. IIRC we paid $20 for ~300 feet - gave the rest away.
Hooked
2018 Piaggio BV 350
Joined: 08 Jun 2019
Posts: 282
Location: NJ
Mon Feb 22, 2021 6:32 pm quote
Re: Sidehall Colonial
Attila wrote:
Karlsbadd wrote:
I love this off topic thread!
Do you like the idea?
It seemed to me that every house is also a mirror of those who live there and then the difference in technologies due to different cultures that changes not only the aesthetics but also the function.
Those with technical interests have them 360 degrees and without wanting to violate the privacy of others, it is nice to know the place where the scooter dreams of each of us are born and live.
The thing that amazed me most is the much use of wood that is used for structures in the USA ... Also the use of light materials and flexible construction techniques. Fantastic!
Some houses that you put the photo of are also characteristic as style.
A note to Greasy ... The important thing is to have a place to return to every time, the appearance is decided by those who live there and the starting point is important that it is robust, the aesthetics can be changed over time but the structure no, but there's no picture of you (I don't even know your real name).
Thank you for letting us participate in a piece of your life.
PS: I took note of the reference of the "lump on a sore dick", very funny.
Yes, I love this. Also it's timely. given my recent purchase. The inside of my house is much more a mirror of me and my wife. The outside is cute, but we may someday change the color. My mother, upon seeing it for the first time said, "it's like you're moving into a fire house! Or a barn!" She's not wrong.

Actually I don't really love this style house, but trying to find a bungalow/midcentury modern home in my area is like looking for a freshwater lake in a desert. Maybe one day when I retire we can move out west and I can ride a scooter 12 mos out of the year...
Hooked
2018 Piaggio BV 350
Joined: 08 Jun 2019
Posts: 282
Location: NJ
Mon Feb 22, 2021 6:33 pm quote
Re: Sidehall Colonial
greasy125 wrote:
Karlsbadd wrote:
I love this off topic thread! They broke ground on my house in 1929, finished in 1931. Aluminum siding, walls made of plaster (good old days), steam radiator heat heated by oil, siding is aluminum, with basement and crawl space for attic. Guessing the foundation is concrete but what it looks like down there. I know that my house is very typical of the houses built in my area at that time. I grew up a couple of towns over and there are a lot of stylistic similarities. I can tell you Attila that houses built then and houses built now are not of the same materials in most cases. My house has what they call here "good bones" meaning a good sturdy structure. My favorite part of it though, is no upstairs or downstairs neighbors. We just bought it in December '20. Still a work in progress but we've done a lot already and mostly ourselves.
that is bitchin' looking!

congrats and welcome to homeownership. little pro tip: it's ALWAYS a work in progress and there's ALWAYS something to do, or needs fixing!

-g
Thanks, man! My one non-negotiable was garage for the scooter. My cars don't fit in there, I don't care. But the scooter needed a place to kick up the wheels and relax. And recharge.
Ossessionato
Triumph Street Scrambler 2018, Suzuki VanVan200 (sold), 2015 Sprint 125 (sold)
Joined: 12 Apr 2015
Posts: 2492
Location: Finland
Tue Feb 23, 2021 2:26 am quote
Re: Homes in Minnesota
greasy125 wrote:
Bob Copeland wrote:
As you are aware from my posts, it can be cold in Minnesota.

Construction, full in ground block or poured cement basement to get
below the frost line. There are some on cement slab built homes - but
they tend to be cold. Most furnaces are natural gas force air stationed in
the basement and run heated and return sheet metal duct work.

On top of the basement, framed wood with insulated walls and sheet rock
finished interior and exterior walls covered with a variety of materials,
wood cedar, Aluminum, Vinyl, brick, stucco. Floors are hardwood, stone, or vinyl with at least 50% of flooring wall to wall carpet. Roof is composite tar shingles.

Many homes are all brick, but framed wood more affordable with the abundance of available wood. My house has partial brick front of the house with cedar on the other three sides for a colonial country look.

My scooters take up the third stall in the garage.

Bob Copeland
Minnesota
ASH!!!
*screams toward the heavens and shakes fists*

seriously the bane of my existence. i have a giant one right next to the shop that just dumps ass loads of leaves everywhere and mostly into the gutter. so then, obviously, i have to get out the big ladder that weighs a metric fuck ton and shuffle my ass up there and clean it all out. but then, of course, i can't just do one side, i have to both. and that's where a saturday afternoon goes missing.

i swear, i'm this ][ close to cutting that thing down.

-g
I have this.

There's a catch though - the gutter has to be of the type fixed from the bottom side, leaving the upper part open. At least here some have fixings going across the top side, disabling the use of these kind of extensions.

fiskarsactiongardenquikfitguttercleaner.jpg

6411501360380.jpeg
It has a telescope type extension, not visible in the pic

Ossessionato
Triumph Street Scrambler 2018, Suzuki VanVan200 (sold), 2015 Sprint 125 (sold)
Joined: 12 Apr 2015
Posts: 2492
Location: Finland
Tue Feb 23, 2021 2:44 am quote
The Canadian style sounds pretty similar to ours.

All starts with dealing the big issue of ground frost, or to be precise, dealing with it melting away during spring and moving the frozen dirt with it. Think big excavators, lots of dirt removed, tonnes of small stones put into instead, insulating layers, underground drain systems... and a lot of money spend just to get you into the starting point

Geothermal heating is increasingly popular. We have one - in our case ~160m deep, small hole in the ground, with a thick water tube loop squeezed in there. Cold water goes in, a bit warmer comes up. This is further compressed and taken to a heat exhanger.. warming both the house and household water. Electric heating resistances as a back-up + for purifying the boiler regularly.

Wooden frames popular, also these modern 'bricks' i.e big large blocks made from natural stone + cement mixture. Actual brick houses are very rare nowadays, although the external layer of a house can be made of narrow bricks - looks like a brick house outside.

All houses have a Sauna, of course! Mostly inside the house, sometimes as a small, separate building.

IMG_20210223_125319.jpg
Indoors Sauna in a simple form (ours). Electrically heated 'stove', into which you'll throw water to get the most out of the 80-90C tortur... sorry, pleasure

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 5024
Location: Latina (Italy)
Tue Feb 23, 2021 4:19 am quote
At the moment my worst maintenance problem is pigeon shit, there are too many also due to lack of natural enemies.
They get dirty everywhere and there are so many ...
You don't even need to use my Atsan 135...it's like pulling flies with a Flak 30.
Molto Verboso
2013 Vespa 300 Super, 2007 Burgman 400
Joined: 30 Mar 2014
Posts: 1969
Location: Minneapolis USA
Tue Feb 23, 2021 7:51 am quote
Ash Trees
Greasy125,

You are right, ash trees dump a ton of leaves. Mine all come down in about
one week. I have to hire neighborhood boys to help me clear them. I have a forest behind the house. We use large tarps, rake the leaves on the tarps
and drag them into the forest.

I had this house built 30 years ago. I love it, but have to get out - exterior
upkeep getting to be to much. Lawn, Snow, painting, replacing rotting wood
on North side of house - no sun causes it to rot. I know this is normal stuff -
but at age 72, I want to stare out the window of a townhouse and not care.

I will miss the backyard. In Minnesota, many urban dwellers own cabins up North on the many lakes. (Minn - Land of 10,000 Lakes). I built a small lake
in my backyard - swim and sit by it and watch the sun go down with a good cigar and brandy. Photos below.

https://flic.kr/s/aHskioLmNg

That is the news from Lake Wobegon

Bob Copeland
Hooked
2007 Vespa 250 GTS
Joined: 15 Sep 2016
Posts: 179
Location: Nashville, Tn
Tue Feb 23, 2021 9:58 am quote
houses
Beautiful back yard, the only thing I would change would be screened enclosure over the deck. It will keep the leaves and other bits of nature off your furniture and keep The flying insects away from your food and brandy!
Molto Verboso
2013 Vespa 300 Super, 2007 Burgman 400
Joined: 30 Mar 2014
Posts: 1969
Location: Minneapolis USA
Tue Feb 23, 2021 10:19 am quote
Keep the Mosquitos Away
tonymarchman,

Thank you. Yes, we do have issues with mosquitos. A good measure of my neighbors do have the screened in porches. The summer sun heats up
the cement deck around the pool during the day and keeps the mosquitos away.
Evidently they can not stand the heat. But you are right, after the sun has
gone down the mosquitos can almost carry you away.

Bob Copeland

mosquito-illustration_2092x1660.jpg
Minnesota State Bird

Hooked
2009 MP3 400, 2004 Honda ST1300
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Posts: 281
Location: Sayre, PA
Tue Feb 23, 2021 10:25 am quote
Here in the Northeast our Ash trees are dying off. (Invasive beetle species) I took down 6 this last summer. Expecting more to go soon.

"You build it once, you build it right."

Poured concrete basement walls and floor, pretty much sitting directly on the shale bedrock, (with some insulation underneath). Timber frame skeleton. Exterior shell of "Structural Insulated Panels". (Big oreo cookies with a layer of flake board on each side and 4" or 6" of crispy yellow foam in the middle). Same stuff commercial freezers are made of. Energy efficient, airtight, quiet. Chalet/Loft floor plan so just a few wood stud and sheetrock walls. Wood and tile floors. Pex domestic plumbing. Small Propane fired boiler in the basement. Hot water radiant heat tubing under the main floor. Absolutely recommend it to anyone. Biggest regret is that the basement floor was poured before we knew about it. Hemlock 1x12 siding. Steel roof.

My wife and I did everything except the concrete and the timber frame. (Both require skills and tools we don't have). 2 years of my life I won't get back, but it was worth it in the end.

And yes there is absolutely a 3 car garage that the cars can sometimes fit in.

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