[NSR] How are your houses made?
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Hooked
2018 Piaggio BV 350
Joined: 08 Jun 2019
Posts: 282
Location: NJ
Tue Feb 23, 2021 10:48 am quote
Attila,
A great show here called "This Old House" chronicles how old houses were made, how to maintain them, update them without taking away their charm. It's one of my favorite programs. Check them out if you're really so interested.
Molto Verboso
2013 Vespa 300 Super, 2007 Burgman 400
Joined: 30 Mar 2014
Posts: 1972
Location: Minneapolis USA
Tue Feb 23, 2021 1:58 pm quote
Really Nice
pmatulew,

Great looking place, wonderful views. You really selected a great location.
Looks like there is going to be a deck? Steel roof you got it all.

You were discussing heat in the cement floors. I insured a young man
from Austria who married a US gal and moved to Northern Minnesota.
He build a two story home with full basement. The first floor and even the
second floor were concrete with heat in them through a pipe system. He
said they do it like that in Austria. I think the same as you described, heat pump with some back up.

Again, great looking place. This looks like a "Back to Waldon Pond" move
on your part.

Bob Copeland
Minnesota
Hooked
2009 MP3 400, 2004 Honda ST1300
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Posts: 282
Location: Sayre, PA
Tue Feb 23, 2021 3:24 pm quote
The radiant heat floors really are awesome. Gentle even heat. Long cycle times. No dust allergy issues from forced air. Totally silent.

Encasing the tubing in masonry is best for thermal mass. Ours is actually tacked up under the wood subfloor between the joists. I did put reflective foam insulation below it to force the heat up. Very nice to wander around in your bare feet on the warm tiles.
Molto Verboso
2013 GTS300ie
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 1224
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Tue Feb 23, 2021 10:02 pm quote
Home isn't mine anymore
The transfer on our house went through yesterday, so the first house I designed, built and lived isn't mine anymore. (Sad moment here )
As I have occupation until end March, the new owner and his team were traipsing through yesterday discussing what they are changing...

I have very traditional views as an architect. When I choose a material for use, I am accepting all its features and limitations. I love materials that exude these features - real stone, clay brick, unpainted timber, slender steel elements and glass to make division disappear. Homes that are built with locally available materials have honest roots and place.

So to that extent, the new owner's (female) decorating team was promoting changes to update a home that has housed and nurtured a family for 37 years was indeed traumatic to me.

I know the difference between "fashion" and "style", but sadly the first was in the forefront. My carefully chosen natural unstained clear varnished t+g pine ceilings they want to paint translucent white. Ditto with the natural maple kitchen cupboard doors. They even wanted to white enamel paint the main feature of the house - a naturally dark 6x20" (150x475mm) laminated saligna timber ridge beam that runs the full length of the house! My natural baked clay floor tiles are to be covered with vinyl interlocking faux-ash flooring. One word came to my mind repeatedly... FAKE.

The faux fashionists were loudly delirious in their work.
Inside me I wept.
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
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Posts: 5053
Location: Latina (Italy)
Wed Feb 24, 2021 12:58 am quote
I lived for 45 years (from my birth) in a large manor house (it was the custom here to make houses in this way) but times changed and when before the children tended to form a nucleus all close together and in the same main house, now everyone goes far away and also to look for a distant job because often there is none here ...
So it was that my father, 15 years ago, decided that living in four in a large house of over 400 square meters was a waste and a useless expense but we were used to living alone in our house and luckily the land on which it stood. the old house had enormous value as a location.
He bought a plot of agricultural land just two kilometers further away but much more extensive (7 hectares in all) at an excessive price ... why?
Well ... it was still four kilometers from the city and the future prospects for revaluation as an urban area were good; meanwhile we built a smaller house with a big garden and started growing kiwis, initially as a joke but over time it became a serious business.
Today it seems that having bought this land was a provident move, in fact the Lazio region has decided to build a huge general hospital less than 400 meters away!
And as often happens, the value of the surrounding land is increasing, estimated to be over twenty times within the next five years.
It therefore seems that I will have to review my plans for the future.
Hooked
2007 Vespa 250 GTS
Joined: 15 Sep 2016
Posts: 180
Location: Nashville, Tn
Wed Feb 24, 2021 5:22 am quote
Fudmucker, I feel your pain. I have built beautiful screen porches with exposed cedar rafters and 2x6 tongue & groove decking only to see it painted white and all the natural beauty of the wood erased. It really hurt. Today, I ask the client if they intend to paint so I can use less expensive materials. Lumber is so expensive now I am paying over twice as much for a screen porch package. What amazes me is the customer doesn't seem to mind paying the additional cost. tonysoutdoorliving.com
Molto Verboso
2013 Vespa 300 Super, 2007 Burgman 400
Joined: 30 Mar 2014
Posts: 1972
Location: Minneapolis USA
Wed Feb 24, 2021 7:41 am quote
Latest Decorative Fashion
Fud,

When you sell you really have to give up the ghost.

I am a traditionalist that likes natural oak cabinets, solid oak six panel doors,
natural wood moldings and built in wood shelving. I am definitely on the
outs.

Everything today is paint over white with gray accents. The all white move
has a clean look, but, not the warmth and majesty of exposed natural wood.
Heck, they are painting over great looking brick exteriors with white paint.

Fud, we are gone with the wind.

Bob Copeland
Old Fashioned in Frost Bite Falls
Molto Verboso
Primavera ET3 & PX150 & GTS 300
Joined: 05 Apr 2009
Posts: 1485
Location: Berlin
Wed Feb 24, 2021 8:36 am quote
Nothing wrong with brick and a touch of solid oak. But too much exposed wood can be overwhelming.
Hooked
2009 MP3 400, 2004 Honda ST1300
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Posts: 282
Location: Sayre, PA
Wed Feb 24, 2021 9:39 am quote
Gone with the wind...the whitewash generation

At our last house, an old greek revival side hall in a little town, I restored the front door and built a custom stained glass panel for it.

Years later driving by we saw that the current occupant had somehow managed to smash part of it. Left my card an offered to fix it. Never heard back.

Last time we drove by the whole door had been replaced with some black steel abomination.

Just have to let it go and move on.

housecapture.JPG

Molto Verboso
2013 Vespa 300 Super, 2007 Burgman 400
Joined: 30 Mar 2014
Posts: 1972
Location: Minneapolis USA
Wed Feb 24, 2021 1:13 pm quote
Greek Revival
pmatulew,

That house has such noble lines. Regrettably, many are in disrepair.
I really like that house - it is a classic.

Bob Copeland
Hooked
2009 MP3 400, 2004 Honda ST1300
Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Posts: 282
Location: Sayre, PA
Wed Feb 24, 2021 3:42 pm quote
Old houses have a history you can't get from modern boxes. Nothing as grand as European history but still.

That house was built sometime in the 1860's. It was moved down the street to it's present location around 1917. Around the same time they put on fancy victorian porch and the bow window on the front. One of the previous owners was a carriage builder, hence the little barn. The place also did some time as an undertaker/funeral parlor. The left front door opens directly in to a sitting room separate from the main space with another door leading in to a small narrow space that didn't make any sense at all until we found out the history. :shock

The place was in a serious state of neglect when we bought it as a young couple. Spent the next 10 years trying to leave it better than we found it.

The next 20 years after we left were not kind.
Molto Verboso
2013 GTS300ie
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 1224
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Thu Feb 25, 2021 5:24 am quote
Our new home...
Where we are going to is also my design.
When my father died, my mother sold up and moved out of the home they had lived in. "Too many memories." she said.

She went and boarded with a lady friend who had had a hip replacement and had no close family. After two years she was ready for a new place. She liked the basic layout of my home with a few changes.

Her (our) new place is what South Africans refer to as a "duet house" - an upmarket name for a semi-detached house with two living units. One unit was for her occupancy and the other a rental for a bit of income. The intention was for her to let the smaller unit out for a few years until she was ready to downscale, then she would move into the smaller unit and rent out the bigger one.

She wasn't even at the end of the first tenant's lease when a suitor came visiting - the widower of one of her good friends. So it was that he proposed, she accepted (after consulting me ) and they married. My stepfather had a large family who would often visit Pretoria for a week at a time. When the lease ran out, mom did not renew and it became an extended family home. The second living unit became rather like a vacation home for the rest of the family. Having gone to great pains to separate the units in the initial design for noise privacy, I then had to join them up again!

Fast forward ten or so years and my stepfather and my mom have both passed. My eldest son is living in the smaller unit. When we move in mid-March, it will be an extended family home again...! My wife can't wait to dote on her teenage grandson in her retirement.

The new place reprised some of the old house, so I will have the memories...
Hooked
2018 Piaggio BV 350
Joined: 08 Jun 2019
Posts: 282
Location: NJ
Thu Feb 25, 2021 8:14 am quote
Re: Latest Decorative Fashion
Bob Copeland wrote:
Fud,

When you sell you really have to give up the ghost.

I am a traditionalist that likes natural oak cabinets, solid oak six panel doors,
natural wood moldings and built in wood shelving. I am definitely on the
outs.

Everything today is paint over white with gray accents. The all white move
has a clean look, but, not the warmth and majesty of exposed natural wood.
Heck, they are painting over great looking brick exteriors with white paint.

Fud, we are gone with the wind.

Bob Copeland
Old Fashioned in Frost Bite lls
Bob and Fud: did we just become best friends??
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 5053
Location: Latina (Italy)
Thu Feb 25, 2021 8:37 am quote
pmatulew wrote:
Old houses have a history you can't get from modern boxes. Nothing as grand as European history but still.

No ... don't say that ... I have some architect friends of mine who often talk about the "American style" and include many buildings with their own style, at least until the early 1970s.
So there is a style architecture typical of your places and it is recognized as such; There are many scenic wallpapers on the web that include aesthetically pleasing American country houses.
It is a bit like the colonial houses in my area, built in the early 1930s, were developed to be rational but even in their simplicity today they are considered a separate example of architecture from the fascist period:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rationalism_(architecture)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latina,_Lazio

I put the historical notes to make you understand how an original architectural style is born from a simple idea (leaving out the political purpose of the architecture used as a representative symbol).
I hope Fud (and others) appreciate this little cultural digression.

Today many of those buildings destined for the agricultural transformation project in my area have become luxury homes.





Hooked
2017 Piaggio BV350
Joined: 21 Jun 2016
Posts: 393
Location: Irving, TX
Thu Feb 25, 2021 10:39 am quote
Attila wrote:
pmatulew wrote:
Old houses have a history you can't get from modern boxes. Nothing as grand as European history but still.

No ... don't say that ... I have some architect friends of mine who often talk about the "American style" and include many buildings with their own style, at least until the early 1970s.
So there is a style architecture typical of your places and it is recognized as such; There are many scenic wallpapers on the web that include aesthetically pleasing American country houses.
It is a bit like the colonial houses in my area, built in the early 1930s, were developed to be rational but even in their simplicity today they are considered a separate example of architecture from the fascist period:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rationalism_(architecture)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latina,_Lazio

I put the historical notes to make you understand how an original architectural style is born from a simple idea (leaving out the political purpose of the architecture used as a representative symbol).
I hope Fud (and others) appreciate this little cultural digression.

Today many of those buildings destined for the agricultural transformation project in my area have become luxury homes.





I think the point he was making is that, while our architecture & nation have history, white settlers didn't get here until the 1500s, while Europe (and Asia & Africa) had been building structures for thousands of years prior to that.

I think about it every time I send a particular gift in Pokemon Go to a player in Europe, or even the East Coast of the US. It's a Centennial Marker celebrating the first 100 years of the city where I live. It was founded in 1903. It makes me wonder if the players open the gift and say, "Centennial, that's cute."
Molto Verboso
2013 Vespa 300 Super, 2007 Burgman 400
Joined: 30 Mar 2014
Posts: 1972
Location: Minneapolis USA
Thu Feb 25, 2021 11:29 am quote
Best of Friends - Traditional Homes
Karlsbadd,

One thing about design trends, they tend to circle back around. I have
always liked the traditional because it is timeless. The nice couple across the
street from my house have remodeled their kitchen twice. I do understand they are a young couple that wanted their own look after purchasing the house.

I have attached a small shot of the kitchen with my blushing bride. Note,
traditional oak cabinets and white refrigerator. I am the only house in
the neighborhood with original formica countertops. All my neighbors have went progressively (countertops) from butcher block to marble/granite to polished
concrete. The refrigerators have went from White, to Chrome, to black.

Hey, maybe I am just to cheap to change. When I am ready to sell the house,
I will watch for the latest counter top fashion and install it to up the resale.

Bob Copeland
Old Fashioned in Minnesota

Bob & Pam.jpg
The old fashioned look - just like me, old!

Molto Verboso
2013 GTS300ie
Joined: 12 Dec 2017
Posts: 1224
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Thu Feb 25, 2021 11:50 am quote
Re: Latest Decorative Fashion
Karlsbadd wrote:
Bob Copeland wrote:
Fud,

When you sell you really have to give up the ghost.

I am a traditionalist that likes natural oak cabinets, solid oak six panel doors,
natural wood moldings and built in wood shelving. I am definitely on the
outs.

Everything today is paint over white with gray accents. The all white move
has a clean look, but, not the warmth and majesty of exposed natural wood.
Heck, they are painting over great looking brick exteriors with white paint.

Fud, we are gone with the wind.

Bob Copeland
Old Fashioned in Frost Bite lls
Bob and Fud: did we just become best friends??
Kindred spirits, it would seem...

I have this simple attitude to materials - we need to change them as little as possible in order to utilise them. They are almost perfect already. It is for us to just amplify the inherent beauty into what we need it to do. I applude organic architecture, where one can see, touch, smell and even taste Nature's gifts to us in the buildings that shelter our lives. The marks of the crafter's tools that have transformed raw material into useful objects are part of the charm.

I have some 25x300 pine planks (1x12") hanging about in my storeroom. They were the bedboards to the brass double bed that my wife and I shared for twenty odd years before polishing the brass became too much of a chore. When we sold the bed, I refused to sell the boards. They have holes from the bolts that fixed them to the iron angle frame. They are absolutely flat, without bowing or twists and have air-dried for 20 years. You don't find wood like that down at the local hardware outlet.

I will keep them until a worthy application comes along. My son, who shares his mother's abhorrence of hoarding, was ready to split them up into firewood ! He hates a cluttered, dirty construction site.
It may be one of the reasons he has so many referrals and repeat customers, but my stuff has take me a long time to acquire and I intend to keep it.
Hooked
2018 Piaggio BV 350
Joined: 08 Jun 2019
Posts: 282
Location: NJ
Thu Feb 25, 2021 12:43 pm quote
My floors are oak. They were badly worn when we bought the house so we sanded and refinished. Not a fantastic job; I'd get them done again at some point. My kitchen was a slop job reno who knows when. It doesn't work well, and the quality of the install was way subpar. My uncle, a contractor, was shocked at the shlock job he encountered. I'm not a traditional style, per se, but I'm also not trying to make my colonial a bungalow. It is what it is, I try and honor that. I'm also of the ilk that you let materials be what they are. In that vein, I'm also anti trend. Open concepts (nope!), butcher block (no thank you), and the island in the kitchen. If it works, okay but I find when I talk to people about redoing my kitchen everyone assumes I want an island. I don't; it wouldn't work in the space.

Sigh. I have strong opinions on what I like. There's a show called Rehab Addict and what I like about Nicole Curtis, the host, is she doesn't try to make a 150 year old victorian home a bland open concept house with zero character and bland design. My .02 sense.
Ossessionato
GTS250
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Posts: 3733
Location: Tempe, AZ
Sat Feb 27, 2021 12:49 pm quote
After my parents moved into their log home, my father built a garage, without permit, inspections, the rest. He told me he made all the cuts with his chain saw, remarking, "I'm just not so good on the finish work anymore.". It looks a little rough, but it still stands.
Member
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Location: Middleboro MA
Sat Feb 27, 2021 2:43 pm quote
1898 AUGUST KLARR HOUSE
so I am the caretaker of this Historic house. Mr Klarr was the town confectioner baker and the story goes he had plenty of dough to build this place. He hire a group of Norwegian Barn Builders and you can tell. 16" x 16" beams, studs are 3" x 12" spaced 20" apart. The boys can bounce a basket ball in the living room and nothing moves or rattles - it has 12' ceilings in most of the house and 14' in both parlors and the vestibule.

cassadysnewhome.jpeg
from warmer days

IMG_0159.jpeg
current weather

Addicted
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Sun Feb 28, 2021 12:35 am quote
Front of my house

FAEB7B42-DB98-4DA0-AD52-ECA4955C96DA.jpeg

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 5053
Location: Latina (Italy)
Sun Feb 28, 2021 1:37 am quote
Beautiful photos of characteristic houses but even simple traditional houses have their own charm.
Keep posting!
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