REVIEW: Piaggio MP3 Three-Wheel Scooter
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Lurker
Vespa GT 125
Joined: 15 Feb 2007
Posts: 3
Location: London England
Mon Apr 23, 2007 8:55 am quote
OK Hi it's me again in London.

I have finally taken delivery of my new shiny silver MP3 250 and have been riding in and around London for the last few weeks.

My comments ....

It's a little slow but I am still running in the engine. I have been on the motorway (freeway to you Americans) and was surprised at the good stability when riding around large trucks. Must be to do with the 200 kgs weight. I wish though that the screen was slightly bigger than the standard version and not as big as the giant windscreen that is a currently available option. It would be nice not to have to pick the flies out of your teeth in the summer.

This scoot gives one the feeling of great confidence when charging through the traffic in London as the brakes are superb and the handling is very stable at lean-angles that I would not have attempted with the Vespa GT. The big suprise is that the overall width of the handlebars is around 1" (yes one whole big inch) narrower than the Vespa GT. I have not once knocked off any unfortunate car owners door mirrors when scything through the narrowest of gaps in my race to get to work.

Luggage capacity far exceeds the Vespa even with that ugly and insecure top box I used to have. You can even carry long rolls of wrapping paper or lovely fresh and fragrant french breads from the bakery with aplomb in the well designed compartment.

So far the only gripe that I have with the scoot is that it is quite difficult reversing such a heavy machine in to a tight parking space but conversely it is a pleasure to just jump on and ride out without having to squash your legs on other bikes whilst struggling to take it off a centre stand.

Overall I am riding around with a huge grin on my face as I know that this machine is FAR more capable than most others in its class. I am a little peturbed however about the stares I get, this makes me quite paranoid!

Would like to hear any other comments from MP3 users, especially if you riding in London.

Mark.
Lurker
PX200
Joined: 22 Apr 2007
Posts: 1
Location: Manila, Philippines
Wed Apr 25, 2007 7:07 pm quote
We can't wait for the MP3 250cc to arrive in Manila due to your review. Thank you for the information you gave us.
Enthusiast
MP3, GTS250
Joined: 02 Jun 2007
Posts: 68
Location: San Francisco
Sat Jun 02, 2007 3:50 pm quote
mp3 is a much safer ride
Having ridden a lot on a GT200 and GTS250, both of which I love, and now riding a mp3 as well, there are three outstanding points for me:

1. The mp3 makes your riding a lot safer, since you are virtually assured to not worry about potholes, pavement irregularities, etc.

2.the braking is much more secure and shorter distances.

3. the suspension and ride is more solid and more comfortable

Most of my riding is in San Francisco. The city streets are rough, and especially at night when it is difficult to see well. The mp3 just takes that concern away! In summary, I love the Vespa looks and performance, but for city driving the mp3 is a huge improvement in safety and comfort.

Last but not least, you can quit using the centerstand! Just park, apply the emergency brake, and walk away. Much simpler.
Enthusiast
Kymco Grandvista 250, Yamaha Vision
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 71
Location: Chicago, IL
Sat Jul 21, 2007 7:27 am quote
MP3 owner's: Parking!!
Hello Everyone! I am new to this forum. I ride a Vino 125, and I am fairly well read on the MP3, most from this forum, and I rode one around the parking lot from a dealer. I have questions:

1) When parking the MP3, is the parking brake locked by the ignition switch? I am worried that some naer-do-well could come by, flip the parking lever to unlocked, and my precious MP3 goes rolling away!

2) Parking again: Does the ignition switch lock the wheels turned as with most bikes? So, if I do not use the parking brake, the MP3 just rolls away?? (without using the centerstand)

3) Is there an online MP3 owners manual available?

4) When I am at a stoplight, and I have the hydraulics locked, no feet down, now I want to go, can I move slowly off and the hydraulics will unlock when I am at a slow but stable speed? Or must I put a foot down somewhere in this process? Is the speed at which the front wheel system unlocks something that I can adjust (owners manual)?

5) has anyone tried to get the "winterizing kit" for the MP3? My understanding is that this includes tires, windshield, grip warmers, lap warmer, etc.

P.S. I have this nasty habit of asking tough questions -- sorry.
The MP3 seems like a great bike -- I think I want one.

Thom
Enthusiast
MP3, GTS250
Joined: 02 Jun 2007
Posts: 68
Location: San Francisco
Sat Jul 21, 2007 9:36 am quote
Drive off from locked stop?
One of the neat things about the MP3 is that there is a switch to Lock or Unlock the front wheels so they do not lean.

This is different from rolling, which is controlled by the parking brake.

Once locked with the switch in the upright position (which can be done on any slope, whether flat or hilly- which is a great convenience),

then turning the throttle will unlock the lock and allow you to drive off without putting feet down.

They say the lock does not release until the RPM reaches 3000, but my personal experience is that as soon as you crack the throttle smartly to pull of from a stoplight, it releases, and I am not really conscious whether it is 3000 or what. It just happens quickly and you are moving and unlocked. Very smart and good working technology!
Enthusiast
MP3 400 ie
Joined: 26 Aug 2007
Posts: 69
Location: Martinez,CA
Sun Aug 26, 2007 2:57 pm quote
I bought my MP3 from Walnut Creek Vespa and love it.
I have been riding a 150 two wheeled scooter for a year now, before I switched over to the MP3 for more safety and power. I was a motorcycle rider 20 years ago , both dirt bike and street bike, but didn't ever really become an expert and stopped after I got in a head on collision with a car and lost a foot and had to relearn to walk after getting a prosthesis, which took about five years. It took me a long time to get up enough courage to get back on a two wheeled or similar vehicle, but now I have a lot more confidence in my riding abilities, both because of experience and because I am a defensive driver, knowing how quickly your life can change if you're not prepared to react fast or are going too fast to react quickly. So I don't race around much and don't really enjoy speeds much faster than 50 mph.

Most of my riding is city and suburbs.

I would like to make an observation about leaning to steer. I intuitively learned to counter steer but also thought that to go around a tight corner was all about how much I leaned. While it feels right and comfortable to lean into a turn, it's not actually the lean that causes the bike to lean and go into a turn.

I did some research when people started telling me about countersteering, because it didn't sound right to me, but quickly found out I was wrong and found many examples written and on youtube to prove this.

Here are some links that should put all questions to rest:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C848R9xWrjc&mode=related&search=
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxM_GU7W-dE&mode=related&search=
http://www.superbikeschool.com/machinery/no-bs-machine.php
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nRUeEkS644


What I have found is that every curve or turn has a sweet spot which at the right moment requires a flick of the steering in the opposite direction of the turn for a brief moment, which in turn causes the bike to quickly lean into the corner and grab the road and catapults one through the curve.

This can be a little scary at first because you have to get to know the sweet spot if it's the first time you take a corner or curve or be experienced enough to quickly find where that spot is the instant you corner. Once you have the hang of it, it's not unlike a mini roller coaster and the feeling is quite exhilarating.

The other thing that perplexed me at first when riding the mp3 was that you have two ways of steering this scooter. One is the process I mentioned which feels like your doing the leaning thing to steer, at moderate to fast speeds and the other is at very slow speeds where in order to maneuver tight turns or avoiding obstacles one steers more like a four wheeler. At first I didn't realize I could do this, so when turning around or avoiding objects I would try to do the lean thing and would make very wide turns, instead of the narrow ones required. It was the weight of the bike that scared me into doing this because really tight turns while leaning can make the bike feel like it's going to lay down, so no when I'm going slow and making tight turns I don't lean at all, but rather steer and now I never get that sensation anymore.

My last observation for now is about the locking mechanism. I was told that it is possible to roll to a stop and hit the lock without ever putting one's feet down, but if you're leaning just a little to much to one side and lock it, it feels like someone just grabbed the front end and is pulling you to towards the ground on one side and like you're about to do a nose dive to one side or the other. After feeling this uncomfortable sensation a couple times while trying to perfect this technique I decided it just wasn't worth the anxiety and now I always put my feet down first, quickly level out and lock it and then put my feet back up. After all, from riding a regular scooter, I'm used to putting my feet down at ever stoplight anyway, so it's really not a big deal to quickly put my feet down first before locking the front suspension and putting my feet up. To me the best part of being able to lock up the front is not the ability to put my feet up at a stop, but rather the fact that I don't need a kickstand and also that I can roll backwards out of my drive way to turn around while it's locked. The other part is just a bonus and I can't complain at all.

At stop signs, I usually can balance the bike on my own anyway and don't have to put my feet down or lock the front end.

I have also found that I don't really like looking down at my speedometer much while driving when going over 20 mph, because almost every time I do, by the time I look up again, I'm now moving closer to the center line or the other side than I was before I looked down. Since I've been in a head on collision before I'm a little more paranoid than most, I'm sure.

I can pretty much feel by the g forces I'm feeling, aprox how fast I'm going. I think the best thing would be if one day they project the speed in a digital readout onto the windshield, much like the new corvettes do.

As for the bike being ugly to some, beauty is in the eye of the beholder and most people ,and I myself, think it looks futuristic and stylish. I'm actually tired of people constantly staring and not watching where they are driving as well as constantly explaining how the suspension works to people who only see it in a locked position once I'm stopped. If it's 5 minutes to 5:00 and I need to run in the bank, I don't have time to explain or give a demo....lol.


I daydream about riding when I'm not riding. When I am riding I try to take the long way so I can ride more. I only wish there wasn't a second or so of hesitation before it rockets away from the line once the RPMs are up because when I split lanes and pull to the front of a long line, people get pissed and want to race me. Luckily even though at first it seems like they may be able to keep up or pull ahead, the speed kicks in and I'm quickly a 100 yards ahead of them so they can relax about me steeling their precious spot in line. One of the main reasons I got a scooter was so that I could get around town more easily during rush hour without grinding my teeth in impatience.

I justify being a line cutter because I stay out of their way, am adding less pollution to the environment and not clogging up the roads during rush hour. I basically follow the bumper sticker creed which is "Lead, follow, or get out of the way" If someone wants to get in front of me, I don't mind at all, so long as they don't then slow down and hinder my speed.

I do agree that a lock on the outside of the seat would have been better for those prone to lock their keys under the seat, but I make it a habit to put the keys in my pocket or in the ignition as soon as the seat is unlatched before I even open the seat.
Molto Verboso
MP3 250
Joined: 07 Jun 2007
Posts: 1135
Location: San Diego
Tue Oct 30, 2007 7:17 pm quote
Everytime I read Jess review on the MP3 I am amazed Piaggio didn't make a brochure with this review..I am going to put Jess on the ballot for President..Jess please do reviews on the 400 and the 500. You are right on the Money..Thank you thank you very much for your time and energy..You are the Man...Wow..And I must add...Eastbayrider you are awesome 2..
Hooked
the Piaggio trike
Joined: 30 Apr 2006
Posts: 417
Location: Paradise, BC
Sun Nov 11, 2007 10:57 pm quote
Background

I picked up a lightly used MP3 from a fellow MVer a little over 2 weeks ago (thanx, Casp!), and have been enjoying her immensely. Previously, I rode a Piaggio Fly 150, and before that a Yamaha Vino 50, both of which I no longer have in my stable, but have throughly enjoyed them as well.

First Impressions

Prior to the purchase, I have already briefly ridden the MP3 before. Its capabilities impressed me, but the test ride was much too short to get a good idea of the trike could do. Having logged a good 6 or 7 hours worth of riding over the last two weeks, I've come to form a better idea of the capabilities of this scoot.

Two of the very first impressions that I had about the MP3 were its smooth and willing power plant and its hefty weight. I don't know whether the smoothness is inherent to the QUASAR engine design, or whether it had more to do with fuel injection being used instead of having a carb, but starting the scoot is always a smooth, easy, and trouble-free operation, and throttle response seems to be more immediate compared to the carburated scooters that I've ridden in the past. In fact, throttle response in the MP3 is noticeably better than the BV250, which had same engine in carburated form.

Having owned smaller scoots before, the MP3's QUASAR engine gave me quite a different experience. While my old Vino's little 50cc absolutely loved to rev, it was totally gutless even when it was screaming at the top of its lungs. The Fly's 150cc LEADER engine had waves of torque to tap into, but it felt somewhat lazy as the engine seems to prefer riding that fat torque curve instead of working harder and faster. The QUASAR engine in the MP3, however, seems to combine the best of both worlds from my two previous engines. On one hand, it is sufficiently torquey that I don't need to rev the bejesus out of her to get the scoot going. On the other hand, she is willing to play if you want to make her sing the high note. In fact, at first I had to be careful with the throttle to not send the engine screaming to 9k+ rpm.

Unfortunately, despite the willing engine, the MP3 is NOT a fast scoot by any means. She has no problem out-pacing the cagers off the line, but despite the 100cc advantage, she seems no faster coming off from a dead stop compared to my old Fly. Coming off a complete stop, or even from a slow rolling start, I really felt the weight of the MP3 holding herself back. I wouldn't say she is slow per se, but she is definitely not a fast scoot.

The Forte

Right from the very start, it is obvious where the MP3's forte lies -- with the extra contact patch and the fancy front suspension, the MP3 was born to be an apex carver. And on the front, she totally delivers.

Even without carving curves, the MP3's ride quality reminded me of the difference between driving a Japanese appliance car and a Bavarian propeller blade sports sedan. The MP3 is responsive and communicative to its rider, and body motions (of the vehicle) are very well-controlled. Unlike Jess, I was never confused about how much I should lean into turns -- rather, it was always a matter of how much I dared to lean going into turns. The MP3 just does what it has been told -- you lean a bit, and she gives you a bit. If you lean like a maniac, she'll carve the turn like a maniac as well.

One of my favourite manoeuvres on a bike is to do the continuous zig-zag -- on an empty stretch of road, I just keep weaving the bike from side to side, leaning as much as I can in each turn without wiping out. In doing this move, I have never leaned as far and had as much fun as I did doing it with the MP3. With my previous scooters and the few bikes that I've ridden, the transient movements have never been as confidence-inspiring as what the MP3 offered. The scooter was so sure-footed and well-planted that I felt there was still leaps and bounds of room to be explored even when the center stand was already scrapping. This could well be a false sense of security, as the MP3 may in fact topple over if I lean any further. But that's how I felt on the scoot, and she never even hinted that she'd let me down in a curve.

In my post-ride examination of the tires, I found the best evidence to my most aggressive rides yet -- the tires were worn almost entirely across the width of the tire. In my aggressive turns, I have only left around 1/3" to 1/2" worth of virgin rubber on the outsides of my front tires. I don't remember how far I've gone with my previous scooters, but I know it wasn't anything close to what I did with the MP3 -- and I've scrapped the center stands of my other scoots as well.

Given that the MP3 is such a heavy scoot though, she really makes her weight known when I take her into a fast sweeper. Of course, that's where counter-steering comes in, and I totally felt like a hooligan cranking the handle bars / steering column while I leaned way out.

She's a Big Girl

Unlike Jess, I found the MP3 to be a big girl. Of course, she is not Amazon-sized, but she is definitely not small. I keep thinking that she has to be bigger than the GTS because she's got the rear end to prove it. (And obviously, she is much heavier as well.) And at 5'10", I found her to give me the perfect amount of room -- even the 2-tiered seat placed me at the perfect distance from everything. I took this as the divine sign to mean that me and the MP3 were meant for each other right from the start.

One very interesting thing I found with the MP3 is that because of her weight, I actually have to put in quite a bit of effort to steer her during my aggressive curve carving and zig-zagging. The direct result of that is, after a series of turns and zig-zags, my waist, lower back, and butt actually get tired from all the effort that I have to exert. Perhaps this is only happening because I was curve-carving like a maniac. Or perhaps it was because I am totally out of shape.

The Balancing Act

In a strange way, I found the balance of the MP3 to be practically perfect and yet completely deceptive at the same time. Because of the front suspension, the fore-aft balance of the scoot is infinitely better than that from any other scooter. In fact, I like the front-rear weight distribution of the MP3 even better than the distribution you get from regular motorcycles -- the front end of other other motorcycles / scooters feels too light by comparison. Of course, this my personal preference, and I can see how the heavier front end could prove to be a challenge for our smaller ladies. But I have absolutely no complains about this -- it is just how I like it.

As Jess has pointed out, the deceptive part about the MP3's balance has to do with its side-to-side weight / balance. It seems to me that up to a certain point (with a small amount of leaning, that is), the MP3 is perfect happy to mask its weight by staying upright more or less on its own. If you are not careful, however, the scooter leans further and suddenly loses all of its will to stay upright. If you are caught off-guard by this, you will most definitely dump the scoot. This is something every MP3 owner needs to be aware of, so put that suspension lock to good use.

High Speed Riding

In putting my MP3 through her paces, I've also done a fair share of high speed riding (nothing crazy -- just up to 110 or 115 kph-ish).

My initial impression of the MP3 at speed is that it is extremely stable. Certainly, this has everything to do with its 3 contact patches, the well-sorted out suspension, and the scoot's heavier weight. At the same time, however, my standard up-right riding position on the MP3 also made me and the scoot prone to cross winds. In fact, during my first high speed run, I was so surprised by the amount of cross wind hitting me that I backed off on the throttle as soon as I had the chance. It took me a while (a good 15 - 30 minutes?) experimenting with various seating positions and foot placements before I found a comfortable and stable high-speed riding position -- I seated myself at the higher passenger seat, and rested my foot on the passenger footrest while bracing the seat / underseat storage compartment with my legs. I also tucked myself in so that I was more or less riding in a typical sportsbike riding position.

Since I am fairly light (only around 135 lbs + gear), I feel like the scoot still has plenty of umph left at 110-ish kph. As long as I am tucking myself in, I think I should have no problem breaking Piaggio's claimed top speed of 125 kph.

Summing It Up

Ever since the Moto Piaggio 3 has been announced, I was thoroughly captivated by the idea of having that extra wheel and still be able to lean. As it turns out, other than the weight, the MP3 is everything I have expected it to be, and then some. Having ridden the MP3, I honestly don't think I can ever ride another scooter / motorcycle with nearly as much fun. Unless that other scoot also has 3 wheels and is much lighter than the MP3, of course.

-Rick
Enthusiast
Scarabeo 500ie
Joined: 02 Feb 2008
Posts: 92
Location: Ocean Front
Sat Feb 02, 2008 3:17 pm quote
Re: REVIEW: Piaggio MP3 Three-Wheel Scooter
[Edit by Boulty] Removed Jess' long quotaion and pics. Your question was lost at the bottom Badaaboo.

I am getting a used MP3, can you let me know what comes with it? such as how many keys? key card or books, etc... thanks.
Lurker
Piaggio MP3
Joined: 15 Mar 2008
Posts: 2
Location: Mandeville,La
Sat Mar 15, 2008 7:14 am quote
MP3 problems
I've had my mp3 for 8 months now and with less than 1400 miles it's going into the shop again to have the stator replaced for the second time in 4 months.
Besides not being able to run when the stator goes bad it will ruin the battery. Without the warranty this repair will cost over $700 dollars.
Lurker
MP3 250
Joined: 31 Jul 2008
Posts: 1
Location: Roswell, GA USA
Thu Jul 31, 2008 10:46 am quote
New to this forum
I am a new rider and I want to thank Jess for the great review. I was all set to buy a Burgman 400 when I read it last Friday. I searched Craigslist for an MP3, and as luck would have it, I test drove one on Saturday. Monday I bought the 2007 with only 900 miles on it and I already love it. I feel very safe on it, has plenty of power for me, and I can handle the weight. Thanks Jess.

Louise
Member
2007 LX 150
Joined: 02 Aug 2007
Posts: 21
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Wed Jun 01, 2011 6:59 am quote
Traded Vespa LX150 to Piaggio MP3 250ie
I traded my 2007 Vespa LX150 to the 2010 Piaggio MP3 250ie on April 15, 2011. I wanted an engine with more power so I could travel on the open the roads and in the city and I wanted a little more stability up front. The machine I bought retailed at $6,669.00 and after trade-in I got it for under $5,000.00.

I've been riding it now for 47 days and the MP3 has not disappointed - for the most part. It did not take me long to adjust to making turns with the maneuverable two-wheeled front end. Engine power and speed is good for the US and State Routes - plenty there and to spare. With the wind at my back I've had it up to 70 MPH.

As for Interstate riding - I made some short distance forays on the local "I" (aka I475) and the machine did well. I think the MP3 250 would be okay in the outer areas of the interstate highways, but riding it on the Interstates within city limits might be tricky - especially if there are multiple entrance ramps coming in from different direction. It might not have the power (aka get up and go) as, for example, 400 cc or 500 cc would have in an emergency (like being being sandwiched by a semi or several cars while others are trying to get on the Interstate).

I recently took the longest trip I ever took on a scooter - about 344 miles total (about 160 - 170 one way). The ride was comfortable and enjoyable - though I did stop 3 or 4 times - including for gas which gave me an opportunity to stretch out and relax. The proof though came the next morning when I did not wake up stiff and in pain from the ride. So that means the machine has good suspension - in fact I don't note bumps as much as I used to on the LX150.

There has, however, is a concern - this was discovered on my long open road ride. About 90 miles into into I was pulled over the Ohio State Highway Patrol for speeding (a got little frisky and s there are many Amish riding horse-drawn buggies 'round where I was - I imagine ol Smokey and his buds are watching that area very closely. I got off with a friendly warning) but the other reason for the pull over was a little disconcerting.

The officer told me my brake lights were white instead of red. I checked it by having him hits the brakes while I stood at the back to watch. And by by golly he was right. I got another friendly warning to to get it fixed ASAP as this was dangerous.

I got to my dealer the next day and told them what the officer told me. They were skeptical, but they checked it out it and verified it.

They immediately took both rear brake light units out and examined them. They found the small red plastic covers which are installed over the white brake light had their plastic retaining tabs broken off and were laying inside the white brake lights lens.

They told me they'd fix me up with some replacement red light bulbs. Meanwhile they would make a warranty claim to Piaggio for the replacement of these read covers. I was to return a little later to get the bulbs installed.

I did return to be advised that the local auto parts stores did not carry any red brake light bulbs. Instead they were going to temporarily install red reflective tape over the brake light lens' while waiting for the new covers to arrive.

Further they also advised me that they checked another 2010 MP3 they recently sold to an elderly gentleman and likewise found the red brake light covers were laying inside the lens too. They also taped it up with reflective red tape as well.

So, I do have some concerns, therefore, here about this being a chronic safety defect with the 2010 MP3. The red tape is fine for low-light or riding in the dark, but bright sun light entirely washes out the red altogether. Someone following me wouldn't even know my brakes are on. But it is a temporary measure. I certainly wouldn't want this to be permanent solution or one I'll have to go through again if the new set of covers also fails.

For now all I can do is hope this problem isn't chronic. I'll post when the parts are replaced (Piaggio/Vespa has not always been fast getting small parts to the dealers), but for now the machines street legal and I'll just have to be careful on bright sunny days.

PS to the original reviewer: thanks for the pics - I saw how you got full-face helmet in the storage compartment - (upside down). I tried that and it worked! I was keeping mine on the outside on the hook since it didn't dawn on me to turn it upside down. Thanks for that pic - it really helped!

---

Just a small update here (on 06/13/11): visited the Dealer and they are trying real hard to resolve this. They told me they have special red light bulbs for the brakes on order from O'Reilly's Auto Parts - but have not yet come in but will advise when they do. They'll be used to replace the red tape that's keeping me street legal.

As for the actual replacement - I was advised they got a brake light unit in - the right side I think - (I guess they have to replace the whole thing), but that the other unit is on back order.

Glad to see that the dealer is making a good faith effort to deal with this warranty issue on my MP3.

Got no complaints on its handling - took a moderate ride on it this past Sunday - rode a major federal route - with the wind at my back I got it up to 75.5 mph (measured via GPS) - faster than rated (72 mph).
Member
MP3 250
Joined: 25 Aug 2012
Posts: 11
Location: Wisconsin
Mon Sep 03, 2012 11:36 pm quote
Jess,

Great review. Thanks. Much appreciated.

As for the eminent demise of the MP3 due to it's uniqueness, it would not be the first time I chose to ignore the rest of the world and enjoy something truly unique. Heck, I still love my 1978 GMC motorhome. Nothing like it before or after in the RV world. And nothing better.

Having ridden many motorcycles from 150cc to my old (now gone) 1200 cc gold wing, and a few 50cc mopeds, I can honestly say that my MP3 is as "worthy" as anything I have ridden. It is its own thing.

You can still love banana candy and taco chips even though they don't taste anything like bananas or tacos.

Be safe. Have fun.

Paul
Enthusiast
Non Yet
Joined: 26 Dec 2011
Posts: 50
Location: Ojai, CA
Tue Sep 04, 2012 8:43 am quote
Excellent review Jess, it actually makes me taking a serious look at a 3 wheeled scooter...
Enthusiast
Non Yet
Joined: 26 Dec 2011
Posts: 50
Location: Ojai, CA
Tue Sep 04, 2012 1:38 pm quote
I just visited the Piaggio USA website and noticed the 500cc MP3 with is only $200 more than the 400cc .

Still I have a hard time with the looks off these MP3 scooters. Wish they gave them some classy curves like a Vespa.

http://www.piaggiousa.com/scooters.html#!s=specifications/mp3-500
Lurker
Joined: 27 Feb 2013
Posts: 1

Wed Feb 27, 2013 2:30 pm quote
novice rider need advice
I live in east bay and am thinking of using this trike for commute on the highways. Never riden a bike before but have a class c license. Has anyone driven this and stopped by cop but not require a M1 endorsement? In general, is motorcylce commute in the bay area freeways safe? How do I not kill myself? Thanks guys!
Enthusiast
Non Yet
Joined: 26 Dec 2011
Posts: 50
Location: Ojai, CA
Wed Feb 27, 2013 6:03 pm quote
Re: novice rider need advice
december95 wrote:
I live in east bay and am thinking of using this trike for commute on the highways. Never riden a bike before but have a class c license. Has anyone driven this and stopped by cop but not require a M1 endorsement? In general, is motorcylce commute in the bay area freeways safe? How do I not kill myself? Thanks guys!
They way people drive here I think its suisidal to commute on the bay area Highway's.
As for cruising the on 880 slinging a shotgun over your shoulder might help...
Lurker
MP3 400
Joined: 09 Nov 2014
Posts: 2
Location: Seattle,WA
Sun Nov 09, 2014 12:53 pm quote
I just bought a 2010 MP3 400 IE. Thanks for such a detailed review and some great tips.
Hooked
2009 Piaggio MP3 400
Joined: 22 Jan 2016
Posts: 342
Location: Chandler, AZ
Tue Mar 01, 2016 12:57 pm quote
Re: Traded Vespa LX150 to Piaggio MP3 250ie
drabikmr wrote:
There has, however, is a concern - this was discovered on my long open road ride. About 90 miles into into I was pulled over the Ohio State Highway Patrol for speeding (a got little frisky and s there are many Amish riding horse-drawn buggies 'round where I was - I imagine ol Smokey and his buds are watching that area very closely. I got off with a friendly warning) but the other reason for the pull over was a little disconcerting.

The officer told me my brake lights were white instead of red. I checked it by having him hits the brakes while I stood at the back to watch. And by by golly he was right. I got another friendly warning to to get it fixed ASAP as this was dangerous.

I got to my dealer the next day and told them what the officer told me. They were skeptical, but they checked it out it and verified it.

They immediately took both rear brake light units out and examined them. They found the small red plastic covers which are installed over the white brake light had their plastic retaining tabs broken off and were laying inside the white brake lights lens.

They told me they'd fix me up with some replacement red light bulbs. Meanwhile they would make a warranty claim to Piaggio for the replacement of these read covers. I was to return a little later to get the bulbs installed.

I did return to be advised that the local auto parts stores did not carry any red brake light bulbs. Instead they were going to temporarily install red reflective tape over the brake light lens' while waiting for the new covers to arrive.

Further they also advised me that they checked another 2010 MP3 they recently sold to an elderly gentleman and likewise found the red brake light covers were laying inside the lens too. They also taped it up with reflective red tape as well.

So, I do have some concerns, therefore, here about this being a chronic safety defect with the 2010 MP3. The red tape is fine for low-light or riding in the dark, but bright sun light entirely washes out the red altogether. Someone following me wouldn't even know my brakes are on. But it is a temporary measure. I certainly wouldn't want this to be permanent solution or one I'll have to go through again if the new set of covers also fails.

For now all I can do is hope this problem isn't chronic
. I'll post when the parts are replaced (Piaggio/Vespa has not always been fast getting small parts to the dealers), but for now the machines street legal and I'll just have to be careful on bright sunny days.

PS to the original reviewer: thanks for the pics - I saw how you got full-face helmet in the storage compartment - (upside down). I tried that and it worked! I was keeping mine on the outside on the hook since it didn't dawn on me to turn it upside down. Thanks for that pic - it really helped!

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Just a small update here (on 06/13/11): visited the Dealer and they are trying real hard to resolve this. They told me they have special red light bulbs for the brakes on order from O'Reilly's Auto Parts - but have not yet come in but will advise when they do. They'll be used to replace the red tape that's keeping me street legal.

As for the actual replacement - I was advised they got a brake light unit in - the right side I think - (I guess they have to replace the whole thing), but that the other unit is on back order.

Glad to see that the dealer is making a good faith effort to deal with this warranty issue on my MP3.
Just want to drop a note here that I have the same problem with one of my brake light red cover falling off inside. This is right after I took delivery of it and rode 110 miles back home from a dealer (I bought it used). The dealer claimed that they didn't notice one of the brake lights to be white. They think it might have broken off during my 110 miles ride on the freeway. My 2009 MP3 400 was only 1340 miles when I took delivery and this happened.

Anyway, I searched this forum and apparently it has happened to other people as well. So this is a common defect. I ended up super gluing it back with great difficulty and a lot of patience, because it's all inside the whole rear light assembly so you can't really manipulate this red lens cover at will. But I got it done. Either that or buy a red bulb, which was not an option for me because I use a Kisan Tail blazer blinking brake light bulb. Or buy a whole new light assembly at maybe $45 on eBayl
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