OP
UTC

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LX150
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Posts: 566
Location: Sartell MN
 
Addicted
LX150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 566
Location: Sartell MN
UTC quote
I got a surprise invite to take in a longerish ride down a numbered two lane highway. It ws windy here today and I couldn't coax more than 60-65mph indicated out the LX150. Now Had we had more time we would have chosen a less travelled route then highway 15 from St Cloud down to New Ulm MN. Nothing like cagers crawling up your tailpipe. Granted they were able to pass but many hung back for who knows why, creating little car trains behind us when they didn't need to. It didn't help that toward New Ulm the road was in pretty bad condition.

It wasn't the mileage, but certainly not the best road for the whole length of the ride when you're on a wheezing 150 and your friend is on a 250.

I have better choices in the garage. I should have taken one of those.

Harv
@naylia avatar
UTC

Member
LX 150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 21
Location: Mountain View, CA
 
Member
@naylia avatar
LX 150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 21
Location: Mountain View, CA
UTC quote
I'm surprised you could even go that fast. Our LX 150 doesn't like to do much more than 55.
OP
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LX150
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Posts: 566
Location: Sartell MN
 
Addicted
LX150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 566
Location: Sartell MN
UTC quote
Yeah, I wasn't very nice to it when I broke it in. Guess I'm one of the lucky ones with this one. But this speed is only what is indicated, not acutal.

The idea onf a 190 kit keeps running through my thoughts.

Harv
UTC

Hooked
2001 et4150 bought in july 2012 with 5300 miles for $1400
Joined: UTC
Posts: 244
Location: connecticut
 
Hooked
2001 et4150 bought in july 2012 with 5300 miles for $1400
Joined: UTC
Posts: 244
Location: connecticut
UTC quote
After having a 150 for a few months, I'd sure like to go up to a 250/ 300 size.

I don't know how people ride the 49cc scooters.
@menhir avatar
UTC

Moderator
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Posts: 5145
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa.
 
Moderator
@menhir avatar
Joined: UTC
Posts: 5145
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa.
UTC quote
My ET4 150 will easily go over 60+ (real, not indicated) but starts to bog down pretty quickly on it's way to 65. Hills, of course, will cause it to slow down quite a bit, even if I get a running start.

When I'm the rolling roadblock, I just pull over to the side and wave them on or, in the case of a line of cars behind me (it only takes one cager who is afraid to pass), pull off the road where it's safe to let them all go by.

Then I ride on in peace, at least for a while.

That's all well and fine when I'm riding alone. When riding with other, faster machines, they may not see the need to pull over with you.

A couple of riders I came across a few years on a long trip, one on a 50cc and the other on a 150cc, solved the problem this way: They rode together most of the time, but when the roads or hills slowed down the smaller scooter, the faster machine would just continue on while the slower machine chugged along, both at their own pace. When they become separated this way, the faster rider would, at some point down the road, just pull over and wait until the slower rider caught up.

Result: Most of the time they were still riding together. When slowed down, the cagers behind only had to pass one scooter, not two at a time.

I worked for them, at least.
UTC

Hooked
Vespa GTS 300 super
Joined: UTC
Posts: 383
Location: London UK
 
Hooked
Vespa GTS 300 super
Joined: UTC
Posts: 383
Location: London UK
UTC quote
MidwestH wrote:
Yeah, I wasn't very nice to it when I broke it in. Guess I'm one of the lucky ones with this one. But this speed is only what is indicated, not acutal.

The idea onf a 190 kit keeps running through my thoughts.

Harv
The 190 kit will only give you better pull low to mid range, as for top speed gains you will be lucky to get another 5mph, you need a aftermarket gear up kit with the 190 kit to get it to reach speeds of over 70mph and top have a stronger top end.

My last LX was a 190 and it was a rocket up to around 60mph then it felt like a normal LX top end give or take a few mph.

Saying all this two of my old bog standard 125 LX's would do 62-63mph easy?
@gregsfc avatar
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Piaggio BV 350
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Posts: 581
Location: Cookeville, TN
 
Addicted
@gregsfc avatar
Piaggio BV 350
Joined: UTC
Posts: 581
Location: Cookeville, TN
UTC quote
Re: A 150cc just isn't enough for some roads
MidwestH wrote:
I got a surprise invite to take in a longerish ride down a numbered two lane highway. It ws windy here today and I couldn't coax more than 60-65mph indicated out the LX150. Now Had we had more time we would have chosen a less travelled route then highway 15 from St Cloud down to New Ulm MN. Nothing like cagers crawling up your tailpipe. Granted they were able to pass but many hung back for who knows why, creating little car trains behind us when they didn't need to. It didn't help that toward New Ulm the road was in pretty bad condition.

It wasn't the mileage, but certainly not the best road for the whole length of the ride when you're on a wheezing 150 and your friend is on a 250.

I have better choices in the garage. I should have taken one of those.

Harv
This was an internal debate I had before purchasing. I knew my main use would be on state highways with speed limits from 45-65, but the majority of my commute is along a two-lane, 55 speed zone.

I decided in the end to spend a little more and get a more substantial ride. I had under bought before and didn't want that situation again. Also, I was persuaded by the fuel economy claims on the new BV 350 so close to that of smaller rides, and I knew this would give me extra power to pass and that it may provide more durability/reliability if I got something that I weren't running at full throttle most of the time.

I wasn't happy with the final price to become legal on the road for a scooter of this size, but anything less would have left me with something less than I needed. I don't have other choices in the garage, except for a cage. I guess if one is going to take a plunge might as well plunge into something that works.
@1markc avatar
UTC

Enthusiast
2011 Vespa 300 GTV
Joined: UTC
Posts: 74
Location: Enumclaw, WA
 
Enthusiast
@1markc avatar
2011 Vespa 300 GTV
Joined: UTC
Posts: 74
Location: Enumclaw, WA
UTC quote
150 scooter
Had a Kymco super 8 150 before the vespa 300. The Kymco scoot was actually pretty quick and good for most all around town scooting. But for real commuting on longer higher speed roads Im very glad for the 300cc engine
@silver_streak avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
2007 Vespa LX 190, 2011 LXV150ie
Joined: UTC
Posts: 8755
Location: Annapolis, MD, USA
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@silver_streak avatar
2007 Vespa LX 190, 2011 LXV150ie
Joined: UTC
Posts: 8755
Location: Annapolis, MD, USA
UTC quote
It's all about patience, priorities, and attitude. A 150 is fine for long trips as long as you are willing to stay off the superslabs most of the time and enjoy the scenery. You just have to allow a bit more time, and learn to enjoy the journey more than getting to the destination quickly. A 190 kit with an upgear will allow you to reliably cruise at a real 60-65mph instead of 55-60, but you'll still be better off on secondary roads. The only real limits are your time and patience.

To me, it's a lot like the difference between sailing and power boating. With a sailboat, the enjoyment comes from the relaxed pace, taking in the environment while under way, eeking the most out of the motive power that nature provides. The destination is secondary. In a fast power boat you just blast along, hardly noticing your surroundings beyond the noise and spray, and it's all about getting to that cocktail at the next marina as quickly as possible.

Either will get you as far as you want to go... around the world, even. But both on two wheels and afloat, I prefer the former approach.
@heavyvino avatar
UTC

Hooked
vino 125 >> BV 500
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Posts: 182
Location: Upper Left Coast
 
Hooked
@heavyvino avatar
vino 125 >> BV 500
Joined: UTC
Posts: 182
Location: Upper Left Coast
UTC quote
My first scooter was a great Vino 125, it would max at 64.5 mph at 100 rpm less than red line, speed was confirmed by a dozen 2 way runs on the same road and verified by a garmin Oregon 200. Top speed was recorded and averaged, but never varied more than 3 tenths.
I have since upgraded to a BV 500, not having to flog the he'll outta my engine sure is nice.
I didn't under buy, as the Vino 125 was perfect for my needs when I bought it, but as I got comfortable with it I exceeded the design of the scooter, started riding distances and speeds that I don't think that the engineers forsaw.
@jkdrummer avatar
UTC

Hooked
2009 Aprilia SC250 (his) 2009 Aprilia Scarabeo 200 (hers)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 361
Location: Seattle, WA
 
Hooked
@jkdrummer avatar
2009 Aprilia SC250 (his) 2009 Aprilia Scarabeo 200 (hers)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 361
Location: Seattle, WA
UTC quote
Must be a 4 stroke. I bet a 2 stroke 150 would have handled it better.
@scooterist avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
71' Sprint Veloce , 05' Vespa PX150, 1978 P200E
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1528
Location: Tucson, AZ
 
Molto Verboso
@scooterist avatar
71' Sprint Veloce , 05' Vespa PX150, 1978 P200E
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1528
Location: Tucson, AZ
UTC quote
The scooters don't do too well on the HWY specially with the smaller displacement and smaller wheels. I hardly take my P200E or kitted PX150 to the HWY.

I had a GTS 300 Super and I was being passed on the HWY to Phoenix by every single car, my speedo would read like 75-80 and I was the slowest.

I found out that it is much more enjoyable and safe to take an alternative route and slow down a little bit and preserve the motor. You really don't want to go 65-70mph full throtle on a scooter for too long. Just my opinion.
UTC

Molto Verboso
'05 Vespa Granturismo
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1610
Location: Rancho Cordova, California
 
Molto Verboso
'05 Vespa Granturismo
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1610
Location: Rancho Cordova, California
UTC quote
You may have had your LX150 up to the reported speed, but you can bet your sweet a-- it was on the LX150 speedometer.
If the LX speedometer is anything like the GT200 speedometer, it's about 20% fast in that range.
If you have any interest at all in finding out what your actual speeds are, get a GPS and try calibrating the scooter speedometer. Very enlightening!
@theoz avatar
UTC

Sir Frets-A-Lot
Vespa GT250ie/L, Honda Ruckus 50, Honda NT700V, Honda CB125
Joined: UTC
Posts: 11197
Location: Bee eff eee.
 
Sir Frets-A-Lot
@theoz avatar
Vespa GT250ie/L, Honda Ruckus 50, Honda NT700V, Honda CB125
Joined: UTC
Posts: 11197
Location: Bee eff eee.
UTC quote
I would normally say a 150 is perfectly fine for anything. At the same time, if you've ever gone up a really really long steep grade that's 55+ mph on a small displacement bike, you know the horrors.

doesn't matter if there's only one car that makes its way up behind you or a small team. it's just not fun.

No grade? just fine.

Grade? Lame.
UTC

Hooked
2001 et4150 bought in july 2012 with 5300 miles for $1400
Joined: UTC
Posts: 244
Location: connecticut
 
Hooked
2001 et4150 bought in july 2012 with 5300 miles for $1400
Joined: UTC
Posts: 244
Location: connecticut
UTC quote
legal or not, I'm not putting a 150 cc on I-95... The thing goes 55 mph, 60 MPH at best....

no way ! traffic speed is closer to 75-80 mph on the interstate.
@caroanbill avatar
UTC

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GTS300HPE PX150 BMW1200R
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Posts: 734
Location: Canberra Australia
 
Addicted
@caroanbill avatar
GTS300HPE PX150 BMW1200R
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Posts: 734
Location: Canberra Australia
UTC quote
Scooters are fun to ride almost anywhere, but they do have their limits. Sometimes being over those limits makes the trip not much fun (for me).

Now I've got a few country runs and a long-ish trip under my belt (oh, the puns) I think I'd be taking my road bike next time. I do love the "just spinning along" feel of the scoot - I was surprised at the fun of being out on the 'range' ... I enjoy the scoot when we're in slower sections of 40 to 50 mph riding, taking in rural or forest scenery ... I just don't think I'll ever be comfortable enough about the tricky bits without enough urge to hold a decent speed on hills and to overtake at will, and (in the particular case of Aussie back roads) without highly competent, supple suspension to keep me "planted".

I find my PX150 struggling to hold 50 on steep hills, and mostly it won't.
I find my GTS250 struggling to hold 60 on steep hils, and mostly it won't.

So if a country route is going to have steep hills with a lot of traffic trying to inspect the inside of my exhaust ... I'll be donning my tour gear and pulling out the raod bike

... 'cepting I'm about to "do" four or five tight runs aroudn the aussie classic scooter rally on the PX .. I think things are different when you're in a swarm!
OP
UTC

Addicted
LX150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 566
Location: Sartell MN
 
Addicted
LX150
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Posts: 566
Location: Sartell MN
UTC quote
Thanks for the advice (ahem). Yeah, I'm well aware of the optimism of the speedometer on modern Vespa scooters. I've had this '07 since late '06 and it's been among five other bikes in rotation. The whole point of the post was a little bit of I-knew-what-this-would-entail-but-did-it-anyway and a little bit about taking a calculated risk. We all do that sometimes and I thought I'd bring up a recent ride which fits the catagory; calculated risk.

Harv
@wleuthold avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
2006 Vespa GT (Rocket): 2005 Vespa GT (Razzo): 2007 Vespa GT (Vanessa): 2009 Yamaha Zuma 125: 2018 Yamaha Xmax (Big Ugly), 2023 Vespa GTS300 (Ghost)
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Posts: 5189
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@wleuthold avatar
2006 Vespa GT (Rocket): 2005 Vespa GT (Razzo): 2007 Vespa GT (Vanessa): 2009 Yamaha Zuma 125: 2018 Yamaha Xmax (Big Ugly), 2023 Vespa GTS300 (Ghost)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 5189
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
UTC quote
MidwestH wrote:
Thanks for the advice (ahem). Yeah, I'm well aware of the optimism of the speedometer on modern Vespa scooters. I've had this '07 since late '06 and it's been among five other bikes in rotation. The whole point of the post was a little bit of I-knew-what-this-would-entail-but-did-it-anyway and a little bit about taking a calculated risk. We all do that sometimes and I thought I'd bring up a recent ride which fits the catagory; calculated risk.
Harv
I have found that my GT is perfect for riding almost anywhere. It's weakness, though, is climbing hills, especially at altitude.

On a four day ride in Colorado last year with a friend, he riding a BMW F800GS, he would ride away from me going up the hills and I would catch him going down. It worked well but he had to wait a bit after very long uphill stretches.

On interstate highways, I can maintain 70 to 75 mph (GPS). This allows me to keep up with some of the traffic, even passing occasionally. It is comfortable enough that I won't hesitate to jump on when i want to speed up a ride.
@belkwinith avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
Honda CTX 700 DN Automatic Motorcycle
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Posts: 5122
Location: Naperville, Illinois
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@belkwinith avatar
Honda CTX 700 DN Automatic Motorcycle
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Posts: 5122
Location: Naperville, Illinois
UTC quote
I started with a Kymco People 150 and loved it. But I have really grown to love and understand my BV 500.

It was harder to deal with at first, but years later, I can turn that thing on a dime. Maneuvering bigger scooters gets better and better, the more you ride it.
@gregsfc avatar
UTC

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Piaggio BV 350
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Posts: 581
Location: Cookeville, TN
 
Addicted
@gregsfc avatar
Piaggio BV 350
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Posts: 581
Location: Cookeville, TN
UTC quote
I don't consider my self an enthusiast. I've only recently introduced myself to the two-wheel scene. I don't have any preconceived ideas about what is a cool ride or a dorky ride or any of that kind of stuff. I was looking for something that would make sense; was not overkill; but not under powered for what I had to have to get to work and back for several years. Of course, as a newbie, there was alot I didn't understand and still don't understand about the two-wheel world, how they operate, what it takes to get good at riding safely, and what it takes to maintain them and to ride comfortably in not-so-great weather. The more I move along the path of understanding what I've got and how it is working out for me compared to other choices that I may have made, the more I'm realizing that I probably lucked out and chose a pretty good product for my application.

Previous to owning a scooter, I would see bikers on motorcycles, and think...what a wasted opportunity for Americans to use less energy for transportation and to save on up front money. To me, the concept of a two-wheel transporter for single or dual passengers, is a great concept. In theory, it should take much less fuel and cost much less to design and manufacturer, a two-wheel machine to move people around than it does for four wheels.

But, in large part, this is not what has happened in our culture with two wheel transportation. I would look at the bikes as they passed me and think...what a waste of a great concept. I would see bikes that were either excessively big and heavy, excessively sporty, excessively luxurious, or a combination; but except for a few exceptions, I would see very few choices that make sense transportation wise. The really laid-back styles, and I don't mean offense to anyone that owns one, but to me, a person shouldn't be in this kind of relaxed position or mode while driving or riding anything on a public street. To me, driving is a more serious vocation that more of us should approach with a more serious attitude.

With respect to scooters, I love the built-in storage, the high fuel economies, CV trannys, but most categories are designed for mostly urban travel. My application is mostly highway travel, although not high-speed interstates, so most folks with my needs/wants don't choose a scooter unless it is a maxi scooter. The more I looked at all choices and my application, I thought that maybe a BV350 might be just right for what I needed.

The Piaggio website listed 65-70 for expected mpg. Since I knew I would be traveling on an almost 100% rural, highway route, and that manufacturers tend to exaggerate mpg results, I expected that I might achieve 60 or a little better as long as I kept my cruising speed in check. But after the first three tanks, and at the point I started commuting regularly with the BV, I've not gotten under 70 mpg on any tank so far. Although a large wheel scooter like the BV350 is probably inferior to similarly-sized, small wheel scooters for urban transportation and inferior to true maxi scooters for alot of interstate traveling and commuting, I may have picked about the best choice for the price with my application. At least I hope that I have; that was my goal.

I have been disappointed in the true cost of start up ownership for entering the two-wheel world. I would never have guessed that to put a $5500 vehicle on the road that it would actually cost $6400. On the other hand, I kind expected the riding gear (helmet, jacket and such) to be a little more than what I found, but all-and-all, I didn't realize that one would have to pay so much more for a scooter than than the prices listed. This was sort of a shock, but once I got to that point of learning the full cost, I had already convinced myself that I needed a scooter. So here I am.

But if I had a lower-speed requirement or a shorter commute, I probably would have gotten only what I needed and no more. If I lived and worked in town, for instance, I'd probably be cycling to work every day and wouldn't consider a motorized bike. When I think of a 150 class, I think of a machine for someone that lives on one side of town or in suburbs and has an easy, direct route to wherever he or she mostly drives with regular speed limits up to 45 and occational speed requirements 55+. Even if one has to get on an interstate each day for only a brief stretch, and then back to city streets, I'd probably choose a 150.

I once traveled from middle TN to Hattiesburg MS, along Hwy 11 in a Honda Elite 80 for a 520-mile trip. There were three towns that I had to get on the interstate, because Hwy 11 merged with the interstate for brief stretches in some of the larger towns (Tuscaloosa, Meridian, and Laural). Though this was technically illegal, I was able to merge on and back off for brief stretches without holding up traffic. It's not as big a deal as some people think, but to get out in rural areas on the interstates, where the average speed may be 79 mph; now that's another matter. If I had to do this on a regular basis, every day for several miles, I'd probably just have the car, because no two-wheel choice that I know of, with that kind of power beats my diesel car for mpg by a whole lot.
@jayhawk avatar
UTC

Addicted
Joined: UTC
Posts: 526
Location: Lawrence, KS
 
Addicted
@jayhawk avatar
Joined: UTC
Posts: 526
Location: Lawrence, KS
UTC quote
gregsfc wrote:
But if I had a lower-speed requirement or a shorter commute, I probably would have gotten only what I needed and no more. If I lived and worked in town, for instance, I'd probably be cycling to work every day and wouldn't consider a motorized bike. When I think of a 150 class, I think of a machine for someone that lives on one side of town or in suburbs and has an easy, direct route to wherever he or she mostly drives with regular speed limits up to 45 and occational speed requirements 55+. Even if one has to get on an interstate each day for only a brief stretch, and then back to city streets, I'd probably choose a 150.
That describes my situation exactly...and it's the reason I have a 150. I ride I-35 daily for about a 2-3 mile stretch where the road is 55, and I've hit highway runs in town up to 65 mph...and my ET4 can hold that speed for short distances (I'm also keeping up with traffic on those roads). That said, the vast majority of my riding is on roads of 35-45 mph.

The longest routine trip I take is a 40 mile ride from KC to Lawrence on back road highways. I may make a longer ride down to the Lake of the Ozarks one day. If 150s and even 50cc scooters complete the Scooter Cannonball...why can't I take longer rides?

Prior to my 150, I rode 50cc scooters for 30 (yes, that's really 30) years. You ride differently when your scooter can't keep up with traffic on many of the roads you ride on (I routinely rode on 35 mph to 45 mph roads). I'd have no issue riding where I'm slower than some, or most, traffic, but I'd consider riding on a 75 mph interstate stretch as a road of last resort...something you do when there is no slower stretch of pavement around or as a shortcut between two smaller state highways. I've ridden on motorcycles on interstates, and I just don't find it as fun to go zipping by that fast (give me AC, a cup holder, and a nice stereo for my interstate travel!).

Eric
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