@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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UTC quote
Scooter-Center wrote:
Who it exaggerates when tightening the screws, could have to fight later with a slide is stuck. All newer SI carburetor have already experienced an improvement, so that the screw head can not act directly on the slide guide.

This is indicated by a small undercut. This trick can also be applied to the older carburetor.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
@koenig_blues avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
a not so normal vbb2 '64, a weirdo vbx '86, a not so normal pts100 '82 and a yellow sunshine '74 sprint
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a not so normal vbb2 '64, a weirdo vbx '86, a not so normal pts100 '82 and a yellow sunshine '74 sprint
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UTC quote
in order to save the new paint from scratch everytime i took of the barrel, i simply cut the fin off Razz emoticon

External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text

have a nice day to you all and cheer
@socalguy avatar
UTC

bodgemaster
63 GL, 76 Super (x2), 74 Primavera (x2), 79 P200, 06 Fly 150
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bodgemaster
@socalguy avatar
63 GL, 76 Super (x2), 74 Primavera (x2), 79 P200, 06 Fly 150
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Location: So Cal
UTC quote
Want an unbelievably easy and fast way to clean oily gunk and grime off your engine, carb and other parts?

This stuff is unreal. I have tried many cleaners, degreasers, chemicals, all with varying success. This literally melts away the gunk and it evaporates quickly without leaving a dripping mess. Made for cleaning sensitive MAF sensors so very safe on rubber, plastic and paint. About $8 a can. A must have for clean freaks.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Location: Victoria, Australia
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
SoCalGuy wrote:
About $8 a can...
Stuff is just so cheap there SCG. It's unbeleivable sometimes. This is a typical price from a national parts & accessories store.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
@rod_r avatar
UTC

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1990's 50s + DR 85
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@rod_r avatar
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UTC quote
$21,99 for the 400ml can in NZ at the same brand store as Ginch
OP
@v_oodoo avatar
UTC

Style Maven
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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@v_oodoo avatar
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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UTC quote
Headset assembly
I used to have a hell of a time getting that little hairpin clip thru those two tiny holes when assembling the throttle/shift tubes & the end piece that gets the cable ends. Then I started doing this and it's much easier now.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
You can see the tip is ground to a blunt point
You can see the tip is ground to a blunt point
OP
@v_oodoo avatar
UTC

Style Maven
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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@v_oodoo avatar
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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UTC quote
Float needle seat refurbished
When you try a new float needle and your carb still leaks, you probably just need a new float bowl top where the other half of the float valve is located. Not usually a problem if you have a largeframe but on a smallie it means the whole carb body .

That wasn't possible on my latest project so I did something I've had pretty good luck with in the past, smallframe and largeframe carbs too.
Use a bamboo shish kebab skewer in your drill  for a minute or so and burnish the needle seat.
Use a bamboo shish kebab skewer in your drill for a minute or so and burnish the needle seat.
Here's a used & an unused one, you can see the black ring made by the valve seat.

I just used the stick, no compounds or even water. 
It should make the seat smooth and round, but the same profile it already had.
Here's a used & an unused one, you can see the black ring made by the valve seat. I just used the stick, no compounds or even water. It should make the seat smooth and round, but the same profile it already had.
UTC

Hooked
Currently Vespaless
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Location: Toronto
 
Hooked
Currently Vespaless
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Posts: 277
Location: Toronto
UTC quote
Ginch wrote:
SoCalGuy wrote:
About $8 a can...
Stuff is just so cheap there SCG. It's unbeleivable sometimes. This is a typical price from a national parts & accessories store.
$7.99 at Canadian Tire. Even cheaper than the USA price since it's in CAD$. Sometimes it's good to be America Light.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
@rod_r avatar
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UTC quote
Re: Headset assembly
V oodoo wrote:
I used to have a hell of a time getting that little hairpin clip thru those two tiny holes when assembling the throttle/shift tubes & the end piece that gets the cable ends. Then I started doing this and it's much easier now.
Don't do what I did in the same situation recently.
Don't drill out the holes because you get slop in the shifter handle when shifting.
Don't partly flatten the sprung washer because the shifter handle doesn't sit snug to the headset
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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UTC quote
Test a clutch seal in place
Not sure if this or something similar is in this thread already... had a quick scan and didn't see it.
blackbart wrote:
Blowing Seals/Vaping

If you blow into that breather tube, you should become red-faced and not be able to continue to blow.

A little more crude, if you suck on the breather tube, a vacuum should develop, and if you stick your tongue on the end of it, the vacuum should remain for a while.
That's assuming the seal is in good condition. I've also read somewhere here that simply putting your finger over the end while it's running will make a difference to the idle if your seal is no good.

External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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UTC quote
Testing autolube function
xantufrog wrote:
You can test the autolube "on the bench" by unhooking the carb throttle slide from the throttle cable/oil metering arm. When you do this and roll the throttle open it increases the oil metering rate but the engine remains at idle. You should see the cloud of 2t smoke increase palpably if you do this and your autolube is working.
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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UTC quote
Removing rear wheel with SIP road fitted
I put this here 1, because it's useful and 2, because Scooter Central could be closing down soon.
Pi- wrote:
Hello,
It's my trick for easy change of the rear wheel with the double trumpet SIP Road ! :tiphat:

There is a copy :



Tu as acheté un Sip Road avec 2 trompinettes et tu te dis que quand tu vas vouloir démonter ta roue arrière tu vas en chier ?

Que nenni , regarde :


Voilà l'objet ...

[url=http://s1180.photobucket.com/user/Gargouilligouilla/media/siproadpi1.jpg.html]External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text[/url]



... Que tu coupes (à la scie à métaux) sans pitié

[url=http://s1180.photobucket.com/user/Gargouilligouilla/media/siproadpi2.jpg.html]External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text[/url]



Tu trouves un bout de tube d'acier de 16mm intérieur

[url=http://s1180.photobucket.com/user/Gargouilligouilla/media/siproadPi-3.jpg.html]External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text[/url]



Tu en coupes 2 morceaux d'environ 3 cm de long
Que tu emmanches et soudes aux extrémités des trompinettes (toujours solidaires et au bon écartement puisque maintenues par la plaque en ferraille)

[url=http://s1180.photobucket.com/user/Gargouilligouilla/media/siproadpi4.jpg.html]External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text[/url]



Après avoir percé , tu soudes maintenant 2 écrous

[url=http://s1180.photobucket.com/user/Gargouilligouilla/media/siproadpi5.jpg.html]External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text[/url]



Dans lesquels viendront des vis qui dépasseront donc ainsi :
(tu les couperas par la suite à une longueur adéquate ou les choisiras de la bonne longueur)

[url=http://s1180.photobucket.com/user/Gargouilligouilla/media/siproadpi6.jpg.html]External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text[/url]



Un petit coup de peinture haute-température

[url=http://s1180.photobucket.com/user/Gargouilligouilla/media/siproadpi7.jpg.html]External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text[/url]



Et hop , tes trompinettes sont désormais démontables en 10 secondes mais néanmoins solidement fixées au pot par les vis en appui sur les 2 sorties.

[url=http://s1180.photobucket.com/user/Gargouilligouilla/media/siproadpi8.jpg.html]External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text[/url]



Il ne reste plus qu'à s'émerveiller :
[size=75](et , à part pour les hérissons, les vis sont quasi-invisibles)


[url=http://s1180.photobucket.com/user/Gargouilligouilla/media/siproadpi9.jpg.html]External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text[/url]


Pi- wrote:
I have done 7000km since this modification without any re-tihtening ...
@marubadu avatar
UTC

Hooked
72 Euro Rally 180 - 74 USA Rally 200 - 1966 SS 180
Joined: UTC
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Location: Detroit
 
Hooked
@marubadu avatar
72 Euro Rally 180 - 74 USA Rally 200 - 1966 SS 180
Joined: UTC
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Location: Detroit
UTC quote
SoCalGuy wrote:
Want an unbelievably easy and fast way to clean oily gunk and grime off your engine, carb and other parts?

This stuff is unreal. I have tried many cleaners, degreasers, chemicals, all with varying success. This literally melts away the gunk and it evaporates quickly without leaving a dripping mess. Made for cleaning sensitive MAF sensors so very safe on rubber, plastic and paint. About $8 a can. A must have for clean freaks.
I just bought a can of this but it's electrical contact cleaner, worked like a charm.
@rod_r avatar
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UTC quote
Timing without the wheel
I picked this tip up from a video on setting the timing on a Puch moped.

If you dont have a timing wheel, you can measure the circumference of your flywheel and divide by 360 to get mm per degree, then multiply by your required BTDC. Measure the circumference by either a dressmakers type tape, or use 2 x pi x radius.

For example, my flywheel measures about 520mm around.

520 / 360 x 19 = 27.444.....my BTDC is 27,4mm away from my TDC mark.

Puch make it even easier, as their flywheels were/are 360mm around the outside...exactly 1mm per degree
@warhorse avatar
UTC

Hooked
'80 Bajaj chetak, '05 LML
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Location: Sydney
 
Hooked
@warhorse avatar
'80 Bajaj chetak, '05 LML
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UTC quote
Cheapo flywheel holder
A piece of rope.....
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
@bigben avatar
UTC

Evil
p2, jet2, lml166
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Posts: 666
Location: Philadelphia, United States
 
Evil
@bigben avatar
p2, jet2, lml166
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UTC quote
rope flywheel holder: do explain a little more if you please
@warhorse avatar
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Hooked
'80 Bajaj chetak, '05 LML
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@warhorse avatar
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UTC quote
Not much to explain. A loop of rope around outside edge of flywheel positioned so that the more it's turned the more the rope tightens and grips. Works well to help loosen or tighten the flywheel nut. Picture above shows rope positioned when removing nut. Happy days.
@rod_r avatar
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1990's 50s + DR 85
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UTC quote
I noticed on one of the SIP workshop videos that he just smacks the end of the wrench to break it loose, without any flywheel holder. Just how tight should the nut be?
UTC

Enthusiast
'69 Vespa Sprint, '59 Lambretta LI125 (S1)
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Location: Louisville, KY, USA
 
Enthusiast
'69 Vespa Sprint, '59 Lambretta LI125 (S1)
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UTC quote
Impact (like from a hammer) is a great way to loosen nuts on parts that can turn. The inertia of the flywheel and engine resist the sudden application of torque. I would specifically not use impact on a part held with a rigid flywheel holder, because it could damage the flywheel. (In both cases I am talking about hitting the wrench, not the your scooter. Same logic applies to impact drivers.)

You can find torque specs at the bottom of this page: http://www.vespamaintenance.com/specs.html

Not sure how that translates to hammer whacks. I use a 16 oz ball pein for mechanical stuff and I'd say three moderate whacks on the wrench. Your hammer and whacks may vary. For unknown parts, the recommendation is usually to fully compress the lock washer, not that you can see it on the flywheel.
OP
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Style Maven
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@v_oodoo avatar
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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UTC quote
Sprint & similar engine assembly
Just to review so you don't forget something. I found this helpful on my current project, a refurbished GL motor. Thanks, Patrick.
oopsclunkthud wrote:
The blue haynes manual covers these engines very well.

1. both bearings go onto the crank
2. heat the clutch side case till water sizzles (I use a small squeeze bottle to test). before it cools down:
a. install the clutch side oil seal
b. install the crank
c. if you find you need to add more heat after installing the seal, do it from the clutch side and avoid the seal.
3. assemble the rest of the engine, gears... but not the clutch.
4. place the kickstart gear on the layshaft and the case gasket on the clutch side case
5. heat the fly side case till water sizzles. before it cools down:
a. install the clutch flywheel side oil seal (I put a bit of hylomar in the crease of the metal flange of the seal.
b. depress the kickstart lever
c. close the cases, make sure the crank, lay shaft, and final drive all line up with the fly side case.
d. After the case is closed (light taps with a soft hammer) make sure everything turns and then install the 4-5 nuts around the crank area and tighten them snug plus a bit.
e. make sure everything still turns and that the kickstart ratchets correctly, then torque the nuts around the crank
6. install and torque the rest of the case bolts.

There is a lot going on in step 5 in a very short amount of time so think it through and lay everything out.
Hold on now,make sure you remember this plastic thing if it's a P series:

(maybe included in step 3, but don't forget it)
External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text
⚠️ Last edited by V oodoo on UTC; edited 1 time
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Location: Victoria, Australia
 
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@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
At 5a I think it's meant to say flywheel side oil seal, not clutch. Great guide.
@bobo avatar
UTC

Ossessionato
'70 Super 150, Medley 150S, '23 Ducati Monster SP
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Ossessionato
@bobo avatar
'70 Super 150, Medley 150S, '23 Ducati Monster SP
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UTC quote
Re: Cheapo flywheel holder
Warhorse wrote:
A piece of rope.....
Where would we be without Parramatta rope Phil? Razz emoticon
@warhorse avatar
UTC

Hooked
'80 Bajaj chetak, '05 LML
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Hooked
@warhorse avatar
'80 Bajaj chetak, '05 LML
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UTC quote
Re: Cheapo flywheel holder
Bobo wrote:
Warhorse wrote:
A piece of rope.....
Where would we be without Parramatta rope Phil? Razz emoticon
Only the finest of ropes for me Laughing emoticon

Somebody gifted me a whole roll a while ago so I'm set for life.
OP
@v_oodoo avatar
UTC

Style Maven
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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@v_oodoo avatar
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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UTC quote
splitting your cases
Bluecati wrote:
Is there a wee gap already in the cases indicating it has STARTED to move?? DONT force anything in between the halves.If there is no gap then push the kickstart down a bit or rotate the gears/wheel so the cruciform doesn't hold on
The reason it wont separate anymore is usually due to one of the main bearings jamming in the cases or jammed on the crank
I prefer to put hot scalding rags on the cases on the "bubble" behind the stator on the fly side(that s where said bearing is housed.) the cases will heat up and expand faster than the bearing or crank.
the cases will separate and youll either have the crank out with bearing on it.....or with the bearing still in the case half.
I actually boil the rags in a saucepan..lift them out with tongs and then lay it on the cases in a circle . then start gentle tapping with a rubber or copper mallet. Manipulate the entire motor so one case half so its locked solid against something firm.(and soft like wood) then all your little taps will be directed to the bearing and not slowly skidding the engine across the bench.
good luck
youll have it apart in the time it takes to post the tool...which also needs heat anyway.
Ive done close to 20 rebuilds with the rags method...and no special tool
This seems simple, safe for the motor, relatively safe for me & it's proven. Gonna try it soon.
@joshzingzing avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
px200 cutdown,px180,px150. Puch SR. Puch scooterette
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@joshzingzing avatar
px200 cutdown,px180,px150. Puch SR. Puch scooterette
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UTC quote
Re: Cheapo flywheel holder
Warhorse wrote:
Bobo wrote:
Warhorse wrote:
A piece of rope.....
Where would we be without Parramatta rope Phil? Razz emoticon
Only the finest of ropes for me Laughing emoticon

Somebody gifted me a whole roll a while ago so I'm set for life.
lol
OP
@v_oodoo avatar
UTC

Style Maven
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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@v_oodoo avatar
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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UTC quote
Tire installation
spiderwebb wrote:
rob hodge wrote:
dilute dish soap and squirt or wipe it on the bead/rim before inflating. about 50/50 with water, more water if yo want to try and use a spray bottle to get it where you need it.

this will lubricate the bead so it can slide into place.
-1
I used to do this but never again after a few horror stories

don't use soap as that can cause future issues of the tire rotating on the rim = pop



I use ultra holding hair spray
works great
drys and won't cause future issues

spray on the rims 1/2
build it all up as is normal
make sure tube is not getting pinched
add air and watch as the bead seats itself was easily = about 40psi

remove air to psi you want

done

External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text
I've used soap & water too but I will try this.
Had a few tires spin a little bit when pressure was on the low side, enough to damage the tube stem = flat tire.
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Location: Victoria, Australia
 
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@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
TYRE installation
Warhorse wrote:
I use talc powder rather than dish soap. Same result but keeps things nice and dry. I also rub talc over the tube so it moves freely within the tire and doesn't get caught anywhere.
Different perspective - This is my preference too, I don't like the idea of moisture inbetween rim/tyre/tube.
UTC

Addicted
Old douglas ..smallie with polini 115..super with nasco 177
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UTC quote
the original pin that hold the boot cover on Super..is just right to use as a tool to tidy up your legsheild trim. the arc of the head of the pin matches the internal arc of the trim
UTC

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Old douglas ..smallie with polini 115..super with nasco 177
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UTC quote
If you are rebuilding a speedo and fitting a new bezel (metal surround) turn the speedo up side down and use the speedo hole in the head as a jig/support.It holds it all in place nicely as you bend the bezel into place .....tap a tap tap tap tap the bezel edge home. Mint
Tape the area with duct tape if your concerned about paint.
@socalguy avatar
UTC

bodgemaster
63 GL, 76 Super (x2), 74 Primavera (x2), 79 P200, 06 Fly 150
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Location: So Cal
 
bodgemaster
@socalguy avatar
63 GL, 76 Super (x2), 74 Primavera (x2), 79 P200, 06 Fly 150
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Location: So Cal
UTC quote
I'm curious how Veglia puts the bezel on at the factory. The pressed fit is impressively tight.
OP
@v_oodoo avatar
UTC

Style Maven
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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UTC quote
Vespa Manuals
This is golden! Thanks a million, Alex. Clap emoticon
culturesponge wrote:
...

Vespa workshop manuals & books : https://www.flickr.com/photos/culturesponge/collections/72157594588640890/

good luck
best
alex
@ SoCal: They would likely use a forming die in a small press to crimp the underneath edge. Two piece die but a little bit like Bluecati describes using the recess in the headset as a die to hold and shape the bezel when reassembling(great idea, wish I'd known that when I had to reassemble a ruined speedo used as a placeholder)
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3/8" OD x 1/4" ID vinyl tubing works well for the rear cowl peg buffers on the P series. A little stiffer than the stock rubber tubing buffers, so it's easier to use the whole roll to push it on, then cut to size. Seems tougher then the rubber tubing, too.
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Hooked
Gran Sport, VMA, PX & GTS
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Hooked
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UTC quote
keep on keeping on Nolan Porter+Ruby Johnson+Curtis Mayfield
V oodoo wrote:
This is golden! Thanks a million, Alex. :clap:
no probs, share the knowledge imho

link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/culturesponge/collections/72157594588640890/

flickr downloader : https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=flickr+downloader&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&gws_rd=ssl

best
alex

(edits to add link to flickr downloader, add screenshot of page & fix typo)
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⚠️ Last edited by culturesponge on UTC; edited 3 times
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2005 GT200 2006 GT200
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2005 GT200 2006 GT200
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Location: SW TN.
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Is the cover coming off your key? I bought a can of PlastiDip and put 3 coats on it. Just use a small drill bit or skewer to clear the hole for the key ring right after dipping. This is a key with a chip but not the master key. Probably a temporary fix(feels pretty secure so far) but it will work until I can get some new keys cut/cloned.

Wish I had before/after pictures but I didn't think of it at the time.
OP
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'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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Getting that effing pin out to free your brake pedal
If you've ever had to fight this battle or if it's in your future, I know you'll appreciate this one. Now you can see what you can't see when you need to.
Ginch wrote:
I have two Super frames and they each have a slightly different angle on that pin. So I would try to work out which angle is going to be easiest to remove the pin from. From memory I think the pedal has to be pushed fully down to get access to the pin... have a look at the pedal itself to confirm.

Hope these pictures are of some help.

External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text

External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text

The angle on this one is about 10-15 degrees off that seam line, where the other one is more like 30ish.


On some bikes you may need to remove a piece of floor trim to push pedal down enuff get good access to that pin or at least pull the rubber strip out.
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Silicone spray lubricant, silicone oil, silicone grease, and dielectric grease all "rehydrate" old, dry rubber parts and o-rings. Works especially well on old, compacted o-rings or rubber gaskets that aren't sealing, it will cause them to swell. Also work great for water proofing electrical stuff, the spary lubricant and oil will penetrate down wire and insulation, while grease water proofs connectors and inside switches.
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MV Santa
GTS250, 1975 VBC, 1980 P200E cutdown
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@vintage_red_matthew avatar
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UTC quote
Neurotic-Hapi-Snak wrote:
Silicone spray lubricant, silicone oil, silicone grease, and dielectric grease all "rehydrate" old, dry rubber parts and o-rings. Works especially well on old, compacted o-rings or rubber gaskets that aren't sealing, it will cause them to swell. Also work great for water proofing electrical stuff, the spary lubricant and oil will penetrate down wire and insulation, while grease water proofs connectors and inside switches.
Silicone spray has it's uses but as someone who occasionally paints vehicles I would ask you to please try to keep it off of your paint. It doesn't hurt the paint, as far as I can tell but it makes it impossible to paint over. Sanding it only spreads it. The only way I have found to remove it is sandblasting.
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'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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UTC quote
setting your timing
Thank you Vader, nicely explained. We definitely needed this!
Original discussion & some other options here: Timing trouble. How do I read this timimg wheel?
Vader19 wrote:
I know you already figured it out Astro, and nice post Jim.. but for any of you who are like me and can't read formulas and can only add, subtract and divide by 2: Razz emoticon

What you'll need:
* Degree wheel
* Pointer (wire / coat hanger)
* Piston stopper
* Something to mark the cae and flywheel with (Sharpie / tiny paint brush / file etc.)


1 - Put the degree wheel on your crank / flywheel.

2 - Set up a pointer (piece of wire or coat hanger) on a flywheel cover screw.

3 - Put a piston stopper in the sparkplug hole.

4 - Roate the crank CLOCKWISE until the crown of the piston hits the stopper and it stops.

5 - Set the degree wheel to 0 (with the pointer) (Be careful not to move the degree wheel independantly of the flywheel when you're rotating the flywheel)

6 - Rotate the crank / flywheel COUNTER CLOCKWISE until it stops.

7 - Write this number down (we'll call this "number 1")

8 - Subtract "number 1"from 360 (the result will be "number 2")

9) Divide "number 2" by 2 (the result will be "number 3")

10 - Add "number 3" to "number 1" (the result will be "number 4")

11 - Remove the piston stopper.

12 - Continue to rotate the crank past where you stopped COUNTER CLOCKWISE until your degree wheel reads "number 4" at the pointer you've made out of a wire)

13 - Mark your flywheel and case here.. this is TDC..

Done!... It's that easy!



To get to say 18 degrees BTDC for example, rotate the flywheel COUNTER CLOCKWISE 18 degrees from your new TDC mark... Mark the flyweel.. this number will be to the RIGHT of your TDC mark on the flywheel.
and remember this
chandlerman wrote:
V oodoo wrote:
When you finally get to the checking w/ a timing lite part, be sure to wind the motor up some, don't set your timing at idle. I know this is especially important on CDI systems and I think probably good practice w/ points as well. If I'm wrong on the points, somebody please jump in & say so.
4,000 RPM's is the official speed to check timing, I believe. Stock engines redline at 6,000, average tuned engines at 7-8,000.
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Molto Verboso
2005 PX150 In a Part-time Relationship with a 2-Stroke Vespa Since 2007
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UTC quote
Checking Clutch Seal with Leak Detector
Unfortunately, because the main seal on a P series is in between the main bearing and crankshaft, there is no way to inspect it without pulling the crank which spoils the bearing and guarantees the seal will get replaced anyways. And if by chance the seal is intact but leaking around the edges due a a worn or deformed bearing housing, it may not be obvious from visual inspection alone.

However, if you've put together a 2T crankcase leak detector, there is a way to test the seal without touching the crank as long as the engine is still closed up. Just hook up the leak tester, turn the engine on it's flywheel side as level as possible, and fill the main bearing race with gear oil. If you see bubbles, there's a problem. If none, all is well and there's no need to pull the crank and spoil the bearing and seal. Flip the engine over and let the excess oil drain from the bearing.
@ginch avatar
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
I found this video quite handy. I thought pinging and detonation were different.

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