@vader19 avatar
UTC

Mr. Clean
P,SUPER,V90, 50 Special
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Mr. Clean
@vader19 avatar
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UTC quote
Those quick connectors are so great.. i use them on all my bikes.. between the fuel line and the carb and the fuel line and the tank.. if I need to pull either, it's just a click away

I didn't know MP had 'em cheaper.. I've been buying the BGM.. think I'll try the MP next time I'm in need.
@ginch avatar
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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@ginch avatar
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UTC quote
Adjusting Halogen headlight bulb
rob hodge wrote:
sawyer280769 wrote:
Anyone fitted a halogen bulb into a sprint headlight?
eh... you lose some of the focus of the pattern. honestly, i'd go brighter rather than changing technology.
primavera130 wrote:
if you try and go with the halogen setup there is a great article in an old scootering magazine about how to back out the bulb to change the focus.
Car Headlight Lamp on Vintage Vespa

This guy made an adjustable holder for the H4 bulb to alter the focus.
⚠️ Last edited by Ginch on UTC; edited 2 times
OP
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If you try halogen, make sure you have a real glass lens and a real all metal reflector. They'll melt the plastic replacement stuff.

I have the halogen from Mercato and only swapped bulbs - now I'm gonna have to go check that focus length & see if it'll benefit from moving back some. The bulbs are considerably brighter & you can get 6V or 12V.
Thanks for the heads up.

Vader - I think the BGM from Jet200 is five & a half bucks less, but maybe the MP stuff is better/easier or something. Go ahead & try a set and let us know how they compare? Now I'm curious.
⚠️ Last edited by V oodoo on UTC; edited 1 time
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Molto Verboso
Vespa GS150, Messerschmitt GS150
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Molto Verboso
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UTC quote
mr.j wrote:
I've found the Motion pro quick disconnect fuel coupler on a smallie indispensable when removing the fuel tank for maintenance/jetting swaps.

My fuel line is short so hanging the tank sideways puts too much strain on the hose. I'm using the 1/4" type straight connect but they do come with 1 or 2 way valves and 5/16" versions. No problems with fuel starvation when coupled with BGM fast flow tap. I'm not sure of any benefit with the lardys since the carb is way easier to access.
I have them on all my scooters. They are also very good for emptying the tank if needed. One half at each end of a 1/2m of fuel line.
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V oodoo wrote:
If you try halogen, make sure you have a real glass lens and a real all metal reflector. They'll melt the plastic replacement stuff
I've never understood this. If you're swapping a same wattage halogen for incandescent, then it will actually generate less heat. Halogen bulbs are more efficient than incandescent, so they convert more energy into light and less into heat than the same wattage incandescent. Now I could see it generating more heat if you swap a higher wattage halogen for a lower wattage incandescent, say a 35w halogen instead of a 25w incandescent.
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V oodoo wrote:
<snip>...I think the BGM from Jet200 is five & a half bucks less, but maybe the MP stuff is better/easier or something. Go ahead & try a set and let us know how they compare? Now I'm curious.
I was going to order from Jet but they were out of stock at the time hence the MP route. One difference is the BGM's come with a traditional o-ring vs. the MP type that includes a brown viton o-ring which has greater fuel resistance.

From researching on other forums, the traditional o-ring can 'swell' up over time with ethanol based petrol. This makes snapping up the coupler difficult and you can end up splitting the o-ring when forcing 'em together. But again YMMV and some people have no problems.

FWIW, I ended up picking up extra viton o-rings just in case and keep one in the tool pouch.
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Super 66
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UTC quote
Its really makes me learn lot of things. Thankyou very much mate!
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Neurotic-Hapi-Snak wrote:
I've never understood this. If you're swapping a same wattage halogen for incandescent, then it will actually generate less heat. Halogen bulbs are more efficient than incandescent, so they convert more energy into light and less into heat than the same wattage incandescent. Now I could see it generating more heat if you swap a higher wattage halogen for a lower wattage incandescent, say a 35w halogen instead of a 25w incandescent.
The hotter a lamp burns the more efficient it becomes. Trouble is the tungsten filament in a standard incandescent lamp would degrade quickly with extra heat so wouldn't last long. Adding a halogen gas prolongs the life of the tungsten and allows the filament to burn hotter for better efficiency and longer life.
OP
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mr.j wrote:
I was going to order from Jet but they were out of stock at the time hence the MP route. One difference is the BGM's come with a traditional o-ring vs. the MP type that includes a brown viton o-ring which has greater fuel resistance.
...
OP
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firekdp wrote:
The hotter a lamp burns the more efficient it becomes. Trouble is the tungsten filament in a standard incandescent lamp would degrade quickly with extra heat so wouldn't last long. Adding a halogen gas prolongs the life of the tungsten and allows the filament to burn hotter for better efficiency and longer life.
Nice! TWO clear explanations in a row.
Thanks, I appreciate both of them! Razz emoticon
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firekdp wrote:
Neurotic-Hapi-Snak wrote:
I've never understood this. If you're swapping a same wattage halogen for incandescent, then it will actually generate less heat. Halogen bulbs are more efficient than incandescent, so they convert more energy into light and less into heat than the same wattage incandescent. Now I could see it generating more heat if you swap a higher wattage halogen for a lower wattage incandescent, say a 35w halogen instead of a 25w incandescent.
The hotter a lamp burns the more efficient it becomes. Trouble is the tungsten filament in a standard incandescent lamp would degrade quickly with extra heat so wouldn't last long. Adding a halogen gas prolongs the life of the tungsten and allows the filament to burn hotter for better efficiency and longer life.
The filament is hotter in a halogen, yes but it still produces less heat. Temp =/= amount of heat. There is no such thing as a free lunch, so to speak. You can't consume 35W of electricity and produce 40W of light and heat. Incandescents have a luminous efficiency of about 2% (for a 120V bulb, the higher the voltage, the higher the efficiency), so a 35W bulb produces about .7W of light and 34.3W of heat. Halogens are slightly more efficient at 3.5%, so 1.25W light, 33.75W heat.

I looked it up, it's because the bulbs are smaller. So even though they produce less heat, it's concentrated in a smaller amount of material, so the bulbs get hotter. Higher bulb temp = melted housing near bulb.
@retroguy avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
1974 V90
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Molto Verboso
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This might be old news but it really helped me. I tend to struggle with washers staying on in an upside down and tight working area, while I try to get the nut on . I put a dab of glue stick to the washer and stick it on first. It stays on immediately . This frees my hand to put the nut on effortlessly.
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@ginch avatar
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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UTC quote
"Matching numbers"
Not exactly a tip, but this gets brought up so often that it's worth keeping in this thread I think.
rob hodge wrote:
here's a cut and paste and slight edit of what i've said before.

Piaggio has never published or provided in any form a list to correlate engine numbers to frame numbers, nor engine numbers to year of manufacture. some sites and people try to correlate frame numbers to engine numbers and date engine numbers that way, but it cannot be relied upon.

one of the pitfalls of trying to identify an engine using a frame chart is all of the exceptions are not really well documented. for example, some of these are incorporated into the lookup scooterhelp does, and some... well, they aren't.

for example,
VSX frames got VSE engines
VNX frames got VNL3 engines up to the VNX2 series.
(however, VLX frames got VLX engines)
early 50's allstates got some wierd case numbers that don't corespond to their frame number, nor any other frame ever produced. (VAN and VA32 comes to mind)
60's allstates recieved VA frame prefixes and VNA1 thru VNB5 engines.

there are others, but these are the most commonly seen.

this can make tying an engine to a model via the prefix troublesome, especially on less commonly seen models.

it's also known that generally more engines were produced than frames in a prefix series, and over time this causes the guessed year of an engine from a frame chart to 'drift' in regards to the frame number it actually shipped with.
Frame numbers are actually VIN numbers, bare replacement frames did not get numbers, although complete replacement engines did get numbers. bare cases did not get numbers, except in some rare instances where they got a unique prefix that does not correspond to what that engine would commonly be prefixed with, nor any frame was ever prefixed with.

in some cases, the same prefix engine was used for two different frame prefixes, increasing the 'drift' further.

this is what makes accuracy of the year off of a frame chart for an engine troublesome; frames only got numbers if they had an engine in them. engines got a number from the prefix series regardless of if they had a frame produced for them or not.


ps. Great idea Retro!
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Hooked
'80 Bajaj chetak, '05 LML
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Tie down
If you want to tie down gear tot the floor between your legs, Loop head dynabolts to suit an 8mm holes are perfect as replacements for the floor bolts that secure the centre stand. They have a m6 thread, same as original.
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Molto Verboso
1974 V90
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I am a kind of a noob to tips, but this worked for me. I had trouble getting my front brake adjusted and I don't have that tool. I took a wood clamp and clamped one side on the shock and the other on the arm. I spun the wheel and I just pumped it until the the wheel stopped and then backed off a little. That gave me one hand to pull the cable and the other to tighten the nut. Maybe it's been done.
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1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 (sold) / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T /Aprilia Sportcity One 50
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UTC quote
Retroguy wrote:
I am a kind of a noob to tips, but this worked for me. I had trouble getting my front brake adjusted and I don't have that tool. I took a wood clamp and clamped one side on the shock and the other on the arm. I spun the wheel and I just pumped it until the the wheel stopped and then backed off a little. That gave me one hand to pull the cable and the other to tighten the nut. Maybe it's been done.
Right click - save.
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Molto Verboso
Vespa GS150, Messerschmitt GS150
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UTC quote
Retroguy wrote:
I am a kind of a noob to tips, but this worked for me. I had trouble getting my front brake adjusted and I don't have that tool. I took a wood clamp and clamped one side on the shock and the other on the arm. I spun the wheel and I just pumped it until the the wheel stopped and then backed off a little. That gave me one hand to pull the cable and the other to tighten the nut. Maybe it's been done.
Cable tie.
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Molto Verboso
1974 V90
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UTC quote
I'm looking for a tip to attach my center stand spring to the frame. It's some sought of S clip that I must have lost. I can't seem to find it as a part unless I buy a whole center stand kit.
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
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http://www.scootermercato.com/Scooter-Parts/Centerstand-Hardware/77252

This should be what you are looking for. I tried making one and it was not worth the time involved.
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bodgemaster
63 GL, 76 Super (x2), 74 Primavera (x2), 79 P200, 06 Fly 150
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Molto Verboso
1974 V90
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UTC quote
Great thanks to both of you. I guess I was thinking it was shaped differently. I tried to make one also. I guess I'll have to shell out the 90 cents. I could have made one for 20 dollars.
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UTC quote
This comes in handy when I'm bringing the batteries indoors for the winter. A loop of ribbon around the battery makes it easy to lift it out of the battery well. Also, I label the batteries so I know which machine it goes back to.
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Retroguy wrote:
Great thanks to both of you. I guess I was thinking it was shaped differently. I tried to make one also. I guess I'll have to shell out the 90 cents. I could have made one for 20 dollars.
Careful there, what kind of 'tip' is this? And you're hitting awfully close to home, friend...

P.S. thanks for the new sig line, been a while & seems made to order
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Retroguy wrote:
Great thanks to both of you. I guess I was thinking it was shaped differently. I tried to make one also. I guess I'll have to shell out the 90 cents. I could have made one for 20 dollars.
Wrap it in some electrical tape so it doesn't scratch or rub away your paint.

Putting a nut on the screw between the lens and base on a P/PX front turn signal can help you get the base flush to the legshield without cracking your lens.
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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UTC quote
Tracing an airleak
From Scooterotica:
mick1 wrote:
Block the exhaust with cloth and hand (should cut out).....if it still runs it's sucking air in through the main seal...
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Don't know if this has been posted, but found it in an old thread.
jwilliams wrote:
jimmyb865 wrote:
on't prick your finger with the fray, painfull

sometimes you can clip a little of the fray off with good cutters

and slowly twist and thread the pinch bolt

use a proper 7 and 8 mm, i think, to tighten well

also there is a tiny bit of brass that should be inside the pinch bolt

that prevents from turning the bolt on the cable while tightening causing more fray damage

nuthin better than a new cable and pinch bolt
Yes, you need an 8mm and a 7mm to do the pinch bolt. Get yourself a cheap spare 8mm and grind boths sides of the open end so it is skinny enough to go under the 7mm wrench. (Wanna be really anal? Buy two, skinny them and put one in your tool roll.)

Let me see a show of hands of everyone that has lost the "tiny bit of brass" so you are forced to turn the pinch-bolt directly on the cable? Huh, huh? Just as I thought. Impossible to find the brass bit so you have to buy a new pinch-bolt?

Not at all. Go to the hardware store and buy some brass rod of the proper diameter to go into the pinch-bolt hole. Cut off about 1/8 in. rounds and keep them in your spare pinch-bolt box and a couple in your tool roll. Magic.

Jim
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Screw Jack
I wanted to make a stand to replace the bulky piece of 2x4 I was using to prop up the end of the scooter for tire changes. Figured it would be only a little more work to make a jack over a stand. Design could be modified for a scooter with 8" wheels or if you have a welder.

Materials list:
1/2 NPT iron pipe flange
5" 1/2 NPT iron pipe nipple
3/4-3/8 NPT iron pipe reducer
5" 1/2"-13 bolt
1/2"-13 flange nut
1/2"-13 wing nut (you can use a hex or square nut but the wing nut is pretty easy to turn by hand so you don't have to carry a wrench to turn the jack)
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
Cut off the threads plus 1/8-1/4" on one side of the pipe nipple. You could use a 4" nipple and not cut, but I wanted more bearing surface.
Cut off the threads plus 1/8-1/4" on one side of the pipe nipple. You could use a 4" nipple and not cut, but I wanted more bearing surface.
Smooth the end of the pipe nipple you just cut, and grind and smooth a curve into the pipe reducer
Smooth the end of the pipe nipple you just cut, and grind and smooth a curve into the pipe reducer
Assemble everything by screwing the pipe nipple into the flange, and by inserting the bolt through the reducer, tighten the flange nut up to the reducer, and screw on the wing nut
Assemble everything by screwing the pipe nipple into the flange, and by inserting the bolt through the reducer, tighten the flange nut up to the reducer, and screw on the wing nut
Grease up the threads and wing nut
Grease up the threads and wing nut
Everything together
Everything together
In use
In use
Taken apart for storage
Taken apart for storage
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Hooked
'80 P200E, '09 Buddy 150 Italia
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Well done, Hapi !
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UTC quote
Oil tank reassembly
Yeah, that's a crafty, compact little jack - I see happy DeLuxe wheel changing in your future, hopefully not too soon or often. Razz emoticon

next up, a neat little trick to get the nut on the oil outlet fitting at the bottom of an autolube oil tank if you don't have enough extensions or the right deep socket:
Retroguy wrote:
Thank you all. Your ideas gave me an idea, I took a square hollow pipe I had used for some body work and duct taped the nut to the end. I fed it down the two tanks and easily manipulated the nut onto the bolt. Luckily the tape gave enough resistance for the open end wrench to tighten it. A little wiggling and the tape released.
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⚠️ Last edited by V oodoo on UTC; edited 1 time
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MV Santa
GTS250, 1975 VBC, 1980 P200E cutdown
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UTC quote
Re: Screw Jack
Neurotic-Hapi-Snak wrote:
I wanted to make a stand to replace the bulky piece of 2x4 I was using to prop up the end of the scooter for tire changes. Figured it would be only a little more work to make a jack over a stand. Design could be modified for a scooter with 8" wheels or if you have a welder.

Materials list:
1/2 NPT iron pipe flange
5" 1/2 NPT iron pipe nipple
3/4-3/8 NPT iron pipe reducer
5" 1/2"-13 bolt
1/2"-13 flange nut
1/2"-13 wing nut (you can use a hex or square nut but the wing nut is pretty easy to turn by hand so you don't have to carry a wrench to turn the jack)
Ahem. I make and sell these. One size for 8 inch, one for 10 and one that is adjustable, not shown.
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
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This.^^^^^ and they work excellent. Thanks Vintage Red.
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SawStop
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UTC quote
I have one of Matthew's, works great.

Still, I really enjoy the do it yourself projects and the use of off-the-shelf parts.

Well done to the both of you.
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Re: Screw Jack
vintage red matthew wrote:
Neurotic-Hapi-Snak wrote:
I wanted to make a stand to replace the bulky piece of 2x4 I was using to prop up the end of the scooter for tire changes. Figured it would be only a little more work to make a jack over a stand. Design could be modified for a scooter with 8" wheels or if you have a welder.

Materials list:
1/2 NPT iron pipe flange
5" 1/2 NPT iron pipe nipple
3/4-3/8 NPT iron pipe reducer
5" 1/2"-13 bolt
1/2"-13 flange nut
1/2"-13 wing nut (you can use a hex or square nut but the wing nut is pretty easy to turn by hand so you don't have to carry a wrench to turn the jack)
Ahem. I make and sell these. One size for 8 inch, one for 10 and one that is adjustable, not shown.
I was actually going to make one like that out of tubing or PVC pipe, since I don't have a welder, but decided to make a jack instead.
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1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 (sold) / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T /Aprilia Sportcity One 50
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@seamus26 avatar
1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 (sold) / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T /Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: UTC
Posts: 2115
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
UTC quote
P200E Front Brake Switch Mod For New Cable
So I took a few minutes to check out the old / new ends again. I grabbed my trusty calipers and this is what I found :

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The old end measured in at 6.08.

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The new end measure in at 6.43.

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The switch diameter measured at 6.18. There was no way that new cable end was going to fit. I took the advice of using the propane torch to add a little heat and the end slipped right off the old cable.

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Unfortunately, the difference in the end size was also reflected in the OD of the cable outer. The old one was 5.08, the new one is 5.62. That wasn't going to work.

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External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text

I decided that - worst case - I was going to eliminate the switch, but I'd rather not. I want the stoplight to work in traffic. I found an appropriately sized drill bit and drilled the switch out ever so carefully.

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External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text

It was pretty much a perfect match. Not bad for hand tools. The plastic gave a little and it slipped right together.

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That's where I left it. I figured I'd better quit while I'm ahead.
UTC

Addicted
Joined: UTC
Posts: 903
 
Addicted
Joined: UTC
Posts: 903
UTC quote
Side markers/auxiliary turn signals
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These are called 3/4" button/clearance/side marker lights, they're made for trailers and found at auto parts stores or stores that have a large selection of trailer parts like farm stores. Super easy to install as bar ends, cut or drill (using a spade or corkscrew bit) a 3/4" hole into the ends of your grips, run a length of wire down the tubes, splice the leads to the wire, and simply pop the lights into the holes. You can either splice the lights into a DC source like the horn wire (I spliced into the parking lamp wire since I switched it to DC) for side marker lights, or splice each respective light into the turn signal wires for auxiliary turn signals. Although they are really bright and have good rear and side visibility, they have poor front visibility since the handlebars sweep back, so I wouldn't use them as the sole turn signals.
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External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text
Two of them could light up quite a bit of my garage for how small they are.
@autojack avatar
UTC

Addicted
'76 Vespa Rally 200
Joined: UTC
Posts: 695
Location: Melbourne
 
Addicted
@autojack avatar
'76 Vespa Rally 200
Joined: UTC
Posts: 695
Location: Melbourne
UTC quote
Thought I would mention this here as I was pretty pleased with myself for figuring it out. In the process of dropping the engine from my Rally, I couldn't break the swingarm nut loose with the ratchets I had on hand. Then I remembered that I have one of those nice big car tire irons, the plus-shaped kind that has four different driver sizes on it. The 7/16 driver (I think it was that one) was a "good enough" fit, I hit the nut with some liquid wrench, and then being able to twist with both arms popped it loose. Hooray for improvisation.
⬆️    About 1 month elapsed    ⬇️
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: UTC
Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: UTC
Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
Test Auto Lube
Test Autolube
SoCalGuy wrote:
Disconnect the throttle cable at the slide and leave the oiler connected. With the scoot idling, twist the throttle. If the oiler's working, it'll introduce more oil as the throttle's twisted, and you'll see smoke.
I apologise if this is already in the thread, but I like the simplicity of it.
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: UTC
Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: UTC
Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
Testing an electronic stator
VESPA AND LML STATOR VALUES

HOW TO TEST USING A MULTI METER


the LML stators are identical except for the push connectors to the piaggio versions. The following tests can be carried out to a Piaggio Vespa stator in exactly the same way.

In terms of wires:-


THREE IGNITION GROUPS:

1. green(LOW TENSION)
2. white(EARTH)
3. red (CDI trip wire)


TWO LIGHT GROUPS:
4. black (EARTH)
5. blue (UN REGULATED AC)(more you rev the engine more voltage it makes)


To test the ignition (set multi-meter to resistance ohms) put your black probe to the white cable (earth) and then make circuits with your red probe to:

1. engine case (should be short circuit or less than 1ohm). if not you have no earth continuity.

2. red wire (should be 105 -120ohms) if it is outside of this your pickup (halls effect sensor is fucked) If the reading is zero you have a short-circuit in the stator, if the reading is infinity (ie the highest on the meter)- you have broken windings

3. green wire (should be 480-540 ohms)if values fall outside of this your single ignition coil winding is damaged.

To test the lighting groups put your black probe to the black (earth) cable, then:

4. test to engine case, again this should be a short circuit less than 1 ohm.

last test on blue cable, start engine, set metre to AC voltage metre.

5. on engine idle it should be pumping out minimum of 21-38 volts at 600 rpm + you can get peak voltage to these values on a good kick of the starter pedal if you take the spark plug out first.

all these values are common on all electronic vespa stators. In addition to the above electrical tests you should physically inspect your stator. Look for breaks in windings, loose studs, dry soldered joints etc.

Simple really - and you can buy an analogue multimeter form places like Machine mart of less than £6.


I found this here - http://www.louthscooterists.co.uk/index.php/tech-help/did-you-know/
@glscoot avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
Vespa GS150, Messerschmitt GS150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1062
Location: Glasgow
 
Molto Verboso
@glscoot avatar
Vespa GS150, Messerschmitt GS150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1062
Location: Glasgow
UTC quote
External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text
Vespa GS150 Engine/Frame

Rear Jack
I use this to prop up the rear end and lift the rear tyre of the ground so as I can run through the gears and listen to the engine to make sure everything is ok. Can be used with the scooter on the centre stand and the rear wheel or hub removed.
@sara_alexandra avatar
UTC

Hooked
PX232 Lambretta li s3, Vespa cross, Vespa cross prototype, Honda NS400r....
Joined: UTC
Posts: 282
Location: Belgium
 
Hooked
@sara_alexandra avatar
PX232 Lambretta li s3, Vespa cross, Vespa cross prototype, Honda NS400r....
Joined: UTC
Posts: 282
Location: Belgium
UTC quote
jack
GLscoot wrote:
External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text
Vespa GS150 Engine/Frame

Rear Jack
I use this to prop up the rear end and lift the rear tyre of the ground so as I can run through the gears and listen to the engine to make sure everything is ok. Can be used with the scooter on the centre stand and the rear wheel or hub removed.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
LML 4-stroke with Pinasco exhaust who's muffler is atached to the suspension.
LML 4-stroke with Pinasco exhaust who's muffler is atached to the suspension.
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