@glscoot avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
Vespa GS150, Messerschmitt GS150
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Posts: 1062
Location: Glasgow
 
Molto Verboso
@glscoot avatar
Vespa GS150, Messerschmitt GS150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1062
Location: Glasgow
UTC quote
I have the one that fits under the gear selector and didn't think it was safe enough to turn the engine over, but still a very useful tool. Not as good as the one in the picture above. Are they for sale? Although with a wider/heavier base.
@sara_alexandra avatar
UTC

Hooked
PX232 Lambretta li s3, Vespa cross, Vespa cross prototype, Honda NS400r....
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Posts: 282
Location: Belgium
 
Hooked
@sara_alexandra avatar
PX232 Lambretta li s3, Vespa cross, Vespa cross prototype, Honda NS400r....
Joined: UTC
Posts: 282
Location: Belgium
UTC quote
I make them myself. Planning a new batch end next month. Selling at 10EUR.
www.theringdingdingshop.be
Sara
@glscoot avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
Vespa GS150, Messerschmitt GS150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1062
Location: Glasgow
 
Molto Verboso
@glscoot avatar
Vespa GS150, Messerschmitt GS150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1062
Location: Glasgow
UTC quote
Bargain, how much including postage to the UK.
@sara_alexandra avatar
UTC

Hooked
PX232 Lambretta li s3, Vespa cross, Vespa cross prototype, Honda NS400r....
Joined: UTC
Posts: 282
Location: Belgium
 
Hooked
@sara_alexandra avatar
PX232 Lambretta li s3, Vespa cross, Vespa cross prototype, Honda NS400r....
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Posts: 282
Location: Belgium
UTC quote
I have no idea . Look in to it tomorrow. Wich part of UK?
@bobo avatar
UTC

Ossessionato
'70 Super 150, Medley 150S, '23 Ducati Monster SP
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Posts: 2531
Location: Sydney, Australia
 
Ossessionato
@bobo avatar
'70 Super 150, Medley 150S, '23 Ducati Monster SP
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Posts: 2531
Location: Sydney, Australia
UTC quote
Re: Testing an electronic stator
Ginch wrote:
VESPA AND LML STATOR VALUES

HOW TO TEST USING A MULTI METER


I found this here - http://www.louthscooterists.co.uk/index.php/tech-help/did-you-know/
Thanks for that Michael. I'll file that one away for the next time my stator karks it. That site has some good stuff. I liked the carb tuning article.
OP
@v_oodoo avatar
UTC

Style Maven
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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@v_oodoo avatar
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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UTC quote
setting points
Bluecati wrote:
Put another washer under the points screw so that there are two...it helps to stop the screw wrecking the setting as you tighten it down.

another trick is to set it too big on purpose so that the last bit of tweaking of the screw brings it to the setting.

oooooorr Using a larger feeler gage blade on purpose can also work..as you remove it can flick back to 0.3 you need

It can be arse..and is part of "doing your time" as a scooterist

By far the best way Ive found is to smash up and old flywheel so you have just the cone .....that gives you all the room in the world to do the setting...you can even hold the points with your hands as you tighten down

Then put you good flywheel on..and keep the cone as part of your toolkit. Nice

Good luck
Great idea, use just the hub w/cam to get easy access to set your points!

If you don't have an old flywheel to sacrifice, this might help. I ground the profile of my feeler gauge blades so they would snake thru the slot and still fit between the points. Spec for my Primavera is .35 - .45 mm so I used the .30 & .10 blades.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
OP
@v_oodoo avatar
UTC

Style Maven
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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@v_oodoo avatar
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 9492
Location: seattle/athens
UTC quote
CDI repair
chuckactor wrote:
...
On my last ride, I noticed the ground wire had broken off the CDI. I had actually fixed this once before. Seems all the old copper turns to dust after awhile. The bike ran OK and a quick check on line confirmed that the ground wire is redundant. Being anal and all, I had to fix it anyway. Replacement CDI's are pretty cheap but I decided to see what I could do.

I took a Dremel and started digging into the potting material on the CDI. About 1/4' down, I found the end of the wire and carved the plastic and insulation out from around it. I then soldered a new ground wire to it and filled the cavity with 5 minute epoxy.

External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text

Hard to see in the picture but I try to use tin plated copper wire. It is alot more durable than standard copper wire and really resists corrosion alot better. Here in Florida its easy to find because its the standard for marine applications (at least on decent boats). If your going through the trouble of replacing the green wire of death or other parts of the scooter, look for tin-plated stranded wire. Costs more but it's better to do it right the first time.

Chuck
UTC

Member
Vespa 50 R V5A1T 1980
Joined: UTC
Posts: 18
Location: Sweden
 
Member
Vespa 50 R V5A1T 1980
Joined: UTC
Posts: 18
Location: Sweden
UTC quote
Re: setting points
V oodoo wrote:
Bluecati wrote:
Put another washer under the points screw so that there are two...it helps to stop the screw wrecking the setting as you tighten it down.

another trick is to set it too big on purpose so that the last bit of tweaking of the screw brings it to the setting.

oooooorr Using a larger feeler gage blade on purpose can also work..as you remove it can flick back to 0.3 you need

It can be arse..and is part of "doing your time" as a scooterist

By far the best way Ive found is to smash up and old flywheel so you have just the cone .....that gives you all the room in the world to do the setting...you can even hold the points with your hands as you tighten down

Then put you good flywheel on..and keep the cone as part of your toolkit. Nice

Good luck
Great idea, use just the hub w/cam to get easy access to set your points!

If you don't have an old flywheel to sacrifice, this might help. I ground the profile of my feeler gauge blades so they would snake thru the slot and still fit between the points. Spec for my Primavera is .35 - .45 mm so I used the .30 & .10 blades.
What if the distance between the crankshaft cone and the breaker point was known? Then you could only use that and add the breaker distance. That way you have a good starting point when adjusting the ignition.

Does anybody know that distance?
OP
@v_oodoo avatar
UTC

Style Maven
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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@v_oodoo avatar
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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UTC quote
^^^Not sure I understand, but sounds way harder than what was suggested
blackbart wrote:
primavera130 wrote:
BlackBart, tell me more. What are using as your suspension point for the back hook?
Are you wrapping the tie downs around the headset like you would tie down a bike? How are you hoisiting the rig up?
I have an electric winch attached to a rafter. I have used mainly solid eye bolts for the engine area, and rope, ratchet straps, or lash straps at the handlebars. Before electric, a simple come-along (cable puller). Both points tied to winch hook.

I've had the best luck at the front using lash straps or rope around the handlebars for leveling. With limited ceiling height, even an arms length off the ground would work okay, and not drop test the whole shebang as severely. It is nice to stand up or sit in a chair for some tasks. The scoot being free to move aggravates some people who've tried it.

I also use it for removing and installing engines. Winches with cordless remotes are nice.

Both devices have stern warnings against use as lifting devices. Use at your own risk.

External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text
.
I've done this and it works well. I've used 3 points in the rafters so it won't swing. No winch, but with 2 guys & a car ramp it's easy to get it up.
@tommylittlescooter avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
BV200, P200E (2),V90 and now a Big Ruckus
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Posts: 1665
Location: Mims, Florida USA
 
Molto Verboso
@tommylittlescooter avatar
BV200, P200E (2),V90 and now a Big Ruckus
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1665
Location: Mims, Florida USA
UTC quote
Just discovered a very easy and quick way of separating the rims from the tire last night when I replaced the tires on my P200. Sorry no pics

1st deflate as much as possible, place tire in bench vise and squeeze hard. Pop the outer half(thin side) off and remove. Now with tire and inner half still firmly seated, open the vise wide, place a block in the rear side tall enough to make contact with rim and in the front side of the vice, place a block small enough to not touch the rim, tall enough to cover tire. Clamp extremely tight, deflate a little more and push the top of the tire away from you and the rim will pop right off with no fuss whatsoever. If I get the time, I will dig out an old tire on a rim and take a pic or video of the procedure.
@jackson85 avatar
UTC

Ossessionato
T5 Pole Position, T for thoroughbred
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Posts: 4630
Location: Dublin
 
Ossessionato
@jackson85 avatar
T5 Pole Position, T for thoroughbred
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Location: Dublin
UTC quote
Iv been using a vice for years for tyre removals. Although I normally just use a claw hammer to get the rim off the tyre once the bead is broke
@autojack avatar
UTC

Addicted
'76 Vespa Rally 200
Joined: UTC
Posts: 695
Location: Melbourne
 
Addicted
@autojack avatar
'76 Vespa Rally 200
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Posts: 695
Location: Melbourne
UTC quote
I've replaced tires or rims three times I think. The third time I finally came up with a method that worked for me (I didn't have a bench vise then, I do now). I'm pretty sure this is how I did it...

Deflate the tire completely and work the two halves of the rim a bit until there is enough of an opening in the middle to pull the tube out. Wedge a piece of scrap wood in between the two halves, and position another piece on the tire sidewall at the same spot, as close to the rim as possible. Lay the wheel on the ground and stand on the second piece of wood, letting it press the tire off the rim.

It only took a little bit of trial and error to get this to work, and then the tire popped right off. So much easier than the other times when I tried dish soap, screw drivers and claw hammers (on old rims I was throwing away and didn't care about), etc.
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
This thread has lots of good info on badges and other stuff - Until when did Vespas came with script badges? Thanks Mr. Doo!
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
Removing smeared aluminium piston from the bore - nikasil
the Falcon wrote:
Battery acid will remove alu from the jug. Wear gloves and goggles and use a scotch brite pad / rag and gently buff it off with the acid.


Nice tip Falcon.
@chandlerman avatar
UTC

Lucky
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella, 66 Smallstate
Joined: UTC
Posts: 9209
Location: Nashville

92 Days Since Last Explosion
 
Lucky
@chandlerman avatar
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella, 66 Smallstate
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92 Days Since Last Explosion
UTC quote
From The Rally 200 Rebuild Thread:
chuckactor wrote:
If you are using a used piston, the pin is probably hanging up on the opening of the hole in the piston. I always deburr the pin hole in the piston prior to installing or removing the pin. You can use a sharp knife or deburring tool to make a little chamfer on the wrist pin hole in the piston. It will make installation and subsequent removal alot easier. The edges of the hole tend to get pushed over a bit during use.

Chuck
@macgerk77 avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
Wrecked '61 VNB '65 Allstate '74 Rally 200
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Posts: 1848
Location: PNW
 
Molto Verboso
@macgerk77 avatar
Wrecked '61 VNB '65 Allstate '74 Rally 200
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Location: PNW
UTC quote
Quick and Easy Throttle Cable Adjustment
I freakin HATE dealing with the pinch bold while replacing/reconnecting throttle cable. trying to keep the cable taut while trying to figure out a way to tighten the bolt in that annoying little cage. Rarely got it tight enough, and if I did it took FOREVER.

Was trying to tighten it today when I got an idea. I adapted Voodoo's "rope and pull" shift cable method and it worked like a charm.

Just tied a knot around the bottom of the vicegrips, tied the other end to something stationary (a jetski trailer in this case), rolled the bike forward till the throttle cable was nice and taut, then tightened that little bastard pinchbolt up. Then fine tuned it with the adjuster nut at the front of the airbox. AWESOME! Thanks Voodoo!!

External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text

External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text
@autojack avatar
UTC

Addicted
'76 Vespa Rally 200
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Location: Melbourne
 
Addicted
@autojack avatar
'76 Vespa Rally 200
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Location: Melbourne
UTC quote
macgerk77 wrote:
I freakin HATE dealing with the pinch bold while replacing/reconnecting throttle cable. trying to keep the cable taut while trying to figure out a way to tighten the bolt in that annoying little cage. Rarely got it tight enough, and if I did it took FOREVER.
I've only replaced a throttle cable once. Instead of a pinch bolt, mine came with a little brass barrel that the cable passes through. You solder it into place. I don't remember adjusting it being *too* big of a deal. I eyeballed it, put it in the throttle arm, it was too loose. Took it out of the arm, moved it up the cable a bit, put it back in. Maybe took 3 tries to get it dialed in. A little fiddly to solder in that space, but easy enough.
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Location: Victoria, Australia
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
The only throttle cables I've ever got are the kind that has two fixed ends... the only adjustment is the carb box adjuster. I didn't realise there was another kind! Makes it easy to fit in the box but you have to replace the whole thing if it needs replacing.
@macgerk77 avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
Wrecked '61 VNB '65 Allstate '74 Rally 200
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Location: PNW
 
Molto Verboso
@macgerk77 avatar
Wrecked '61 VNB '65 Allstate '74 Rally 200
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Posts: 1848
Location: PNW
UTC quote
well all I've ever had is the "fuck-me-in-the-arse-this-sucks" kind
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Location: Victoria, Australia
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
Longer hub studs
cartmel808 wrote:
For future reference - I got some longer studs from Beedspeed (M8 x 35mm).... fitted them at the weekend with no issues & they're perfect for the SIP Tubeless Rims.
From Scooterotica.
OP
@v_oodoo avatar
UTC

Style Maven
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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@v_oodoo avatar
'74 50s x3 '78 P200 E '84 Cosa '91 PK50XL2 - & - '58 AllState '68 Sprint '66(?) Super125 and '72 DanMotor Super150
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UTC quote
Setting your timing
Degree wheel? I don't need no stinkin' degree wheel!
rob hodge wrote:
...

to be honest, i only use a Degree wheel these days to check port timings.

for ignition, it's just set a TDC mark on the case and flywheel and whip out the timing light.

no real math involved, honestly.

step one- rotate one way til you hit piston stop. make a mark on the case and a mark on the flywheel.

step two- spin the flywheel the other way till it hits the stop again. make a mark on the flywheel wherever the mark from step 1 is on the case.

step three- take a piece of paper, and make a mark on the edge. line this mark up with one of the marks on the edge of the flywheel. curl the paper along the edge of the flywheel, and make a mark on the paper where it hits the other mark.

step four- fold the paper in half, lining up the two marks.

step five- line up the two marks on the paper and the two marks on the flywheel. transfer the fold point from the paper to the flywheel.

now, when this middle mark on the flywheel lines up with the make on the case, you are at TDC. you can then use an adjustable timing wheel to dial in the timing, or a fabric tape measure around the outer edge to make a timing mark ( divide the circumference by 360 and multiply that by the number of degrees)

or, if you only have a piece of paper, fold it corner to corner. now it's a 45 degree wedge. fold it again. now it is 22 .5 degrees. this wedge can be used to set most timing, as the majority of vespas use a timing of 22 degrees +/- 1 degree.
Simple & easy to remember, I like that.
UTC

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Addicted
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UTC quote
Cheap and quick trailering thing-a-mabob. Take a 2x4 around 5'9" long, screw a 12" 2x4 piece on one end to for an L shape. Screw some 1x6, 1x8, or 3/4 plywood/osb along the short piece to tie it to the long piece. Screw some 1x4's or 1x6's to the sides along the long 2x4 to form a channel. A 3.50 tire will just fit in the channel.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
You only need one strap... I've trailered mine thousands of k's and never had an issue. It relies on having a solid location for the front wheel like you have there, and pulling it forward slightly. I put a strap over, wrap it around the seat post and down the opposite side, then tighten it up, compressing the rear suspension. It pushes the front suspension down to a degree as well, until there is very little movement at the headset at all. The tighter the straps are, the less chafing you'll have if you can only tie them close to the scooter.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
@mjrally avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
73 & 74 Rally, 76 ET3, 80 P200, 06 PX150, 61 Ser 2, 65 Silver Special, 90 V5N 50, 01 ET2, 2015 HD Road Glide Special
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Location: Oceanside, CA
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@mjrally avatar
73 & 74 Rally, 76 ET3, 80 P200, 06 PX150, 61 Ser 2, 65 Silver Special, 90 V5N 50, 01 ET2, 2015 HD Road Glide Special
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Location: Oceanside, CA
UTC quote
Stolen from Ginch-

I do it like this, mainly because I find it easier to get to when I need to tighten or remove it. But I think it also means that the cable is not bending (through the hole in the arm) at the same place it's being pinched by the pinch bolt.


Next time I change a cable I'm going to add an extra piece of outer on after the pinch bolt and try using the 4th hand tool on that. That way the cable inner can still tighten, but I'll have more room with the wrenches to tighten the pinch bolt.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
Joined: UTC
Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
I have a short length of outer in my tool case just for that!
@socalguy avatar
UTC

bodgemaster
63 GL, 76 Super (x2), 74 Primavera (x2), 79 P200, 06 Fly 150
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Posts: 7046
Location: So Cal
 
bodgemaster
@socalguy avatar
63 GL, 76 Super (x2), 74 Primavera (x2), 79 P200, 06 Fly 150
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Posts: 7046
Location: So Cal
UTC quote
That is nice Ginch.. didn't have time to chase down some tubing, but I plan to try this next time!
UTC

Banned
62vnb , 71 sprint ,1974 vespa90
Joined: UTC
Posts: 648
Location: Idaho falls
 
Banned
62vnb , 71 sprint ,1974 vespa90
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Location: Idaho falls
UTC quote
I like that idea , if your cable snaps you still have a little extra to play with if in a pinch on the side of the road .
@bigben avatar
UTC

Evil
p2, jet2, lml166
Joined: UTC
Posts: 666
Location: Philadelphia, United States
 
Evil
@bigben avatar
p2, jet2, lml166
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Location: Philadelphia, United States
UTC quote
Got a copy of a Stella key today, when I was at my local locksmith with the Scooterworks supplied blank, they let me know that a Volvo car key blank would have worked perfectly instead. They showed me a comparison, it was spot on.

Next time.
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Addicted
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Addicted
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UTC quote
Ginch wrote:
You only need one strap... I've trailered mine thousands of k's and never had an issue. It relies on having a solid location for the front wheel like you have there, and pulling it forward slightly. I put a strap over, wrap it around the seat post and down the opposite side, then tighten it up, compressing the rear suspension. It pushes the front suspension down to a degree as well, until there is very little movement at the headset at all. The tighter the straps are, the less chafing you'll have if you can only tie them close to the scooter.
The front wheel "chock" was too small to hold the front wheel up, I'd suggest a 12x12" square or right triangle instead of the 6x9" pieces I used.

Plus I like redundancy, I have had a strap come loose despite being quite taught and the suspension loaded. Probably happens when you hit a bump and the suspension compresses just a enough to allow the hook to unfasten.
@trumpyscooter avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
Black 2007 PX200, Dark green 1986 PX225 Pinasco, "1972"(yeah rite) Tangerine px200, several TRIUMPH TIGRESS SCOOTERS
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Location: New Zealand
 
Molto Verboso
@trumpyscooter avatar
Black 2007 PX200, Dark green 1986 PX225 Pinasco, "1972"(yeah rite) Tangerine px200, several TRIUMPH TIGRESS SCOOTERS
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UTC quote
Rubber Engine Mounts
Rubber bushing install care of Rob
rob hodge wrote:
get several wide hose clamps.

put them around the new bushing, to compress it.

put it in freezer overnight.

remove from freezer, remove hose clamps.

slide in hole.

wait for the rubber to warm up and return to the normal shape.

the hose clamps make the rubber bushing smaller, and freezing it overnight makes it stay in this smaller shape until it returns to room temperature and the rubber returns to it's pre-compressed shape.
@macgerk77 avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
Wrecked '61 VNB '65 Allstate '74 Rally 200
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Posts: 1848
Location: PNW
 
Molto Verboso
@macgerk77 avatar
Wrecked '61 VNB '65 Allstate '74 Rally 200
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Location: PNW
UTC quote
Neurotic-Hapi-Snak wrote:
I like redundancy
believe me, we've noticed.
UTC

Addicted
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Addicted
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UTC quote
Mirror extenders

Could also be used as mirror risers
Cut the head off a bolt
Cut the head off a bolt
Thread headless bolt into coupling nut, secure with loctite
Thread headless bolt into coupling nut, secure with loctite
Install between mirror head and stem
Install between mirror head and stem
How to compress the wave spring between the cable pulley and headset journal so you can get the pin in
How to compress the wave spring between the cable pulley and headset journal so you can get the pin in
@ginch avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
GS 150/160 cylinder differences & modifications
rob hodge wrote:
Dave Lobster wrote:
Are the 150s and 160s much different? I do know of several people with SS180 barrels on 160s. One of them with a long crank.
a GS 150 engine is a unique animal; it is widemount engine derived. unlike other widemounts, it has four cylinder studs like latter 125/150 engines instead of the 3 earlier engines have. these are in the same pattern as the later 125/150, and is why the M1XL can be grafted on, although it is far from a bolt on.

the GS160/SS180 engines are pups from the same litter and have many swapable/interchangeable parts as they basically use the same casings. the are largeframe engine derived.


the GS160/SS180 stud pattern is the same as the later Rally/P200 engines, although piston ported instead of rotary. it's why the P200 is a wonky engine, in some ways. it was basically a Sprint V engine with a SS/GS top end grafted on with a different stroke and a third port added in place of the old piston ported inlet.

if any top end were to be able to be swapped into a GS160/SS case, it'd be a cylinder inducted reed for a p200. however, the case would need to be bored or the cylinder turned down as the hole the spighot goes into is slightly smaller, like a Rally 180 VS the 200 engines.

as far as piston swaps, there were in the 60's and are available again 180 bore pistons to fit a GS crank. these have a different wrist pin diamiter. the GS shares the diameter with the other 125/150cc scooters, while the SS uses the larger diameter wrist pin the later Rally/P200 engines have. people have also welded up the third transfer port o na P20 piston and run these on an SS rod to get around 220cc.

the GS160/SS engines have a number of small differences like different crank taper diamiters and such that make a crank swap and some of the other things you mention troublesome. (GS160 ignition won't fit SS crank) swapping a SS rod onto GS crank webs used to be the go-to for performance, although that has changed as the theories regarding crankcase volume have evolved.

the exhaust is easy ,as these have stubs that screw in like the Rally/P200 engines, although smaller diamter than a P, conversion screw in stubs are available to use P200 exhausts. this is easy, as the exuahst stub is in the same place and alignment as the P200 engine.

i could go on, but that's some basics. if you need to know any more background, let me know.

really, all i'd recommend on a GS 160 unless you are an engine building geek is a 180 bore piston for a GS crank, and a re-jet to SS180 spec.
@subetherbass avatar
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1997 Italjet Formula 125, 2 matching N.Z. '69 VBC Super, 177cc Racer, VespaCross Bodge, Puch SRA150, Piaggio Zip 100! & others
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@subetherbass avatar
1997 Italjet Formula 125, 2 matching N.Z. '69 VBC Super, 177cc Racer, VespaCross Bodge, Puch SRA150, Piaggio Zip 100! & others
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Mounting points
Here are a few more potential mounting points, a bit of grafix, a bow, & I added 2/- smoke to make you feel at home
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Addicted
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Addicted
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Re: Tie down
Warhorse wrote:
If you want to tie down gear tot the floor between your legs, Loop head dynabolts to suit an 8mm holes are perfect as replacements for the floor bolts that secure the centre stand. They have a m6 thread, same as original.
How long are the centerstand bracket bolts? I'm going to buy some M6 eye bolts but don't know how long.
@warhorse avatar
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Hooked
'80 Bajaj chetak, '05 LML
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Location: Sydney
 
Hooked
@warhorse avatar
'80 Bajaj chetak, '05 LML
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About 30mm?? Just guessing. Take one out and measure. I had to cut down the eye bolts otherwise they were too long.
@ginch avatar
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Veni, Vidi, Posti
@ginch avatar
74 Super, 75 Super, PX project, LML off-roader and '66 Blue Badge Smallframe
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Posts: 8515
Location: Victoria, Australia
UTC quote
Best point setting tool ever
Best point setting tool ever
Bluecati wrote:
Now I realise not everyone will have an old flywheel.
If you do ....smash all the fins of with hammer..so you have just the inner part with the key way

Pull your good flywheel off and slide on the home made special

Now you can set your points with all the room in the world....and you can actually hold the points gap with your fingers as you lock down the screw

This becomes a permanent part of your tool kit.
Great tip Bluecati!
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Wheel shim
You'll need an 8mm or 5/16" fender washer, I used a 5/16"x1.5" washer, if I remember correctly. Cut or grind a curve to match the wheel or hub on two sides, it will probably take a few test fits to get it just right, so take off very little at a time.
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Hooked
PX, 1960 150, scrap heaps
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Location: Indianapolis
 
Hooked
PX, 1960 150, scrap heaps
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Location: Indianapolis
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Yes this does work. Takes plenty of time and patience. I worked on my jug for three nights. But I was happy with the results
Ginch wrote:
Removing smeared aluminum piston from the bore - nikasil
the Falcon wrote:
Battery acid will remove alu from the jug. Wear gloves and goggles and use a scotch brite pad / rag and gently buff it off with the acid.


Nice tip Falcon.
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Mr. Clean
P,SUPER,V90, 50 Special
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Mr. Clean
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apple wrote:
Yes this does work. Takes plenty of time and patience. I worked on my jug for three nights. But I was happy with the results
Ginch wrote:
Removing smeared aluminum piston from the bore - nikasil
the Falcon wrote:
Battery acid will remove alu from the jug. Wear gloves and goggles and use a scotch brite pad / rag and gently buff it off with the acid.


Nice tip Falcon.
My friend and neighbor swears by Muriatic Acid (you can get at the hardware store) for removing aluminum from a cylinder after a soft-seize.

Here's on video on the subject:

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