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Looking at getting something to keep the paws warmer during the winter and can't make up my mind between gloves or grips.

Currently looking at gerbing heated gloves and oxford or symtec heated grips, anyone with experience with any of these? Any other suggestions?

Cheers!
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I don't have experience with those products specifically. But I have used both heated grips and gloves. I prefer the heated grips simply because you don't have to deal with wires up your sleeves.

-Craig
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grips are always on the scoot, never leave home with out them.
they are also good when getting caught in the rain in the summer.
not bulky like gloves
no wires or cords to deal with.
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I have both heated glove liners and heated grips.

If I had to choose one, I would choose the heated glove liners. The reason is that these can heat your fingers up to and including the tips and the back of the fingers. These keep my hands warm where they need the heat most. We loose a lot of heat on the backs of our fingers and the tips as we ride, these areas are the exact areas heated by the heated glove liners. The heated grips are only effective when you had your hands on the grips. The tips of our fingers seldom come in direct contact with the grips so they never get warm enough, at least for me.
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Heated grips are way easier to use, but........they'll never keep your hands warm like heated gloves. There are many ways to go with heated gloves so you don't have to deal with all the wires running down your sleeves.

If you are just commuting heated grips, other then that heated gloves.
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I've got both, and both have their advantages and disadvantages.

My heated glove liners provide heat on top of the fingers and all along the thumb. the heat is gentle and constant and used together with handlebar muffs to keep the wind out, they do a good job. I've got 'Warmthru' glove liners, which will fit nicely underneath most gloves. the battery pack is a bit of pain - I find it a bit bulky - but it does have several different heat settings and the batteries can last up to 6 hours on a single charge. clicky (this company also does heated gloves, which I've not tried)

heated grips are much less trouble in that once they're fitted to the scooter, there's nothing else to worry about. however, if you're riding without handlebar muffs, you'll find that the tops of your hands get very chilly as the grips provide heat only to the palm - and it dissipates very quickly if it's not contained in a muff (fnar fnar). I also find that the 'high' setting cooks my hands a bit, especially at highway speeds, and the 'low' setting is not warm enough to do much good - however I've got very fussy Raynauds-afflicted hands which need quite a lot of direct heat to keep from going numb. I've had the Oxford grips fitted to two scooters now and never had a problem with them.
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I'd be worried that your scooter would have enough power to run heated clothing/grips. Having to plug gloves in would be a nuisance for me and I prefer heated grips. Grips paired with muffs are an ideal solution.
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Turkman wrote:
...
If you are just commuting heated grips, other then that heated gloves.
I think that's a really good point. If I was touring, the wires for the gloves wouldn't bother me and I'd really appreciate the extra warmth of the gloves. But for commuting (which is what I do most days of the year), I felt like the wires were a hassle to deal with.

-Craig
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Whichever way you go consider the electrical system on your bike. In my experience, they're pretty wimpy and you may end up at your destination with a battery that doesn't have enough power to re-start your scoot. Of course, this doesn't apply to battery-powered gloves.

Others will likely have additional information but I figured it was worth mentioning.
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My opinion is that for the cold weather riding that we get in Toronto, the heated liners are worth the extra little trouble of running the cables and plugging them in each ride. I never have freezing cold finger tips and often my hands almost get too warm. I've never had that happen in the winter with the heated grips. If our temperatures weren't so cold in winter, the heated grips would be sufficient. As well, my fingers get cold even when indoors, so I need the maximum heat possible when riding, for other people who don't suffer with chronically cold hands, the heated grips may be more than enough so that is another thing to consider.
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I now commute 45 miles one way to work and this morning was the first real cold morning. It was between -1C and 3C. I have heated grips but I sure could have used heated gloves. I think it's time in invest in some. My wife as heated gloves (Gerbing) and she loves them.
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frogman_94 wrote:
I now commute 45 miles one way to work and this morning was the first real cold morning. It was between -1C and 3C. I have heated grips but I sure could have used heated gloves. I think it's time in invest in some. My wife as heated gloves (Gerbing) and she loves them.
Crazy Razz emoticon I didn't have the stones to ride this morning but was thinking of youu. I may try it later this week just to see how bad it is.
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if i recall, you're doing the knowledge, which means you'll be out riding all day? .... so anything battery operated might not be an option. If that's the case then I'd go for the heated grips plus handlebar muffs combo - your hands will stay dry and toasty all day long, and you can easily get away with wearing lightweight gloves. i wear summer gloves all year round
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genie wrote:
I've got both, and both have their advantages and disadvantages.

My heated glove liners provide heat on top of the fingers and all along the thumb. the heat is gentle and constant and used together with handlebar muffs to keep the wind out, they do a good job. I've got 'Warmthru' glove liners, which will fit nicely underneath most gloves. the battery pack is a bit of pain - I find it a bit bulky - but it does have several different heat settings and the batteries can last up to 6 hours on a single charge. clicky (this company also does heated gloves, which I've not tried)

heated grips are much less trouble in that once they're fitted to the scooter, there's nothing else to worry about. however, if you're riding without handlebar muffs, you'll find that the tops of your hands get very chilly as the grips provide heat only to the palm - and it dissipates very quickly if it's not contained in a muff (fnar fnar). I also find that the 'high' setting cooks my hands a bit, especially at highway speeds, and the 'low' setting is not warm enough to do much good - however I've got very fussy Raynauds-afflicted hands which need quite a lot of direct heat to keep from going numb. I've had the Oxford grips fitted to two scooters now and never had a problem with them.
Here's an alternative view....neither of them!

I'm like Genie and suffer dreadfully with cold-hand-syndrome also possibly Raynauds though I've never been officially diagnosed.

For sure, heated grips + muffs work and so do heated gloves/inners. I've tried both with varying degrees of success....and failure.

What I've found though from riding and from working outside in Winter (self employed electrician, folk ask me to run cables to summerhouses every winter!) is that if you can keep your body core warm and out of cooling airflow, your hands stay warmer than if trying to heat them directly.

So, my weapons of choice these days are:-

1. a screen
2. muffs (if the screen doesn't protect my hands
3. a heated waistcoat (Keis) with a Li-ion battery pack so I can swap from bike to bike if need be and also wear it outside working.

Just my own experience/choice though, so usual caveats apply.
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This is just the topic that was just under the conscience level of my brain. I love to be comfortable all the time and miss riding this time of year just for this reason.

I have heard that a Lx will power a set of heated grips from a trusted member
posting on this forum, and this thread continues to round out the topic.

After living with my Lx for a while I rather not splice into the electric system.

A heated set of gloves powered by a separate battery pack that keeps the whole hand warm on every scooter/bike for both rider and pilon sounds good.

The huge draw back to these battery powered gloves is the end life of the battery and what happens to it.

Any recommendations/ interesting battery gloves out there?
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I have considered the muffs for a while, but don't think i'd get on with them. My main worry of grips is power drain, although hooked up to a relay, I have been told they'll still drain a fair amount of juice. I imagine gloves will drain much less and seem to be more logical as cold fingers/knuckles is currently my kryptonite.

Any other possible options like the heated gloves with battery pack?
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You'll be severely hampered by heat loss if you don't use muffs or at least hand guards to protect your hands from cold air passing over them.

This will happen whether choosing to heat your palms, the back of your hands or, like I suggested, your body core.
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I've got heated grips on my c600 and they work great. However, if the temps fall below about 40 degrees, I find I also need my heated glove liners for longer rides as the tips of my fingers still get a little cold/numb. With the heated glove liners on full blast, my hands are warm even with sub freezing temps.

I don't really care for the heated glove liners. I have a battery pack version and just find the wiring to a pain and then they tend to take away freedom of movement in my hands. If I had to do it again, I'd just buy heated gloves and I plan on getting an outlet installed so I can just plug them in directly to the scoot directly.

Does anyone sell a windblocker of some sort that covers the grips kind of like on those enduro motorcycles? I think they are called bark busters or something. The main thing to keep your hands warm is getting the wind off them. Muffs look warm, but damn they are ugly but I guess function over form.
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Ged, I think we are all different. I don't have problems with my body core, but my hands and feet turn to blocks of ice. Always. They did on an hour's ride to Gatwick on Saturday morning. The grips keep the worst of the cold at bay. I find that my heated waistcoat makes me very sweaty. I long for something to keep my feet warm though!
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DougL wrote:
Ged, I think we are all different. I don't have problems with my body core, but my hands and feet turn to blocks of ice. Always. They did on an hour's ride to Gatwick on Saturday morning. The grips keep the worst of the cold at bay. I find that my heated waistcoat makes me very sweaty. I long for something to keep my feet warm though!
I don't have problems with my body core either, Doug. The solution was borne of desperation after too many long, cold rides with painfully frozen hands...oh and feet too.

I agree though, there's no one-size-fits-all solution but part of every solution is keeping the cold airflow off your hands.
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Last year, after a lot of research, I ended up getting the Gerbing T5 heated gloves with temp controller. Those gloves are incredible and, aside from the minor issue of plugging/unplugging every time, they are a great option.

Still, heated gloves should only be used to complement some other form of passive insulator i.e. muffs. I found out the easy way when my left hand glove stopped working right before Spring rolled in. Gerbings has lifetime warranty on the gloves, so I was able to get it RMA'd under warranty, but I think I'd have to spring for the muffs if they failed during a really bad winter.

I've since bought these Manzella Stealth II gloves for my primary go-tos and save the heated gloves for those days when it's super cold, like two weekends ago when the temp went down to 20F with a windchill of 0F.

http://www.rei.com/product/853086/manzella-gore-tex-stealth-ii-gloves
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do heated grips actually keep your hands warm?


It seems like it would only keep your palms warm.... whereas cold wind hits the other side of your hand.
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I use Gerbing G3 electric gloves with my GTS for winter time riding and commuting. As others have said, without some sort of shielding against the wind the heated grips are not enough unless you have hands of iron.

I've ridden BMW bikes in cold weather and they have enough power to really get hot and keep your hands toasty but all had fairings or hand guards to keep the wind away. Naked grips are another story.

The wires can be a pain until you practice enough that you don't think about putting them into your jacket. I can't count how many times I was all dressed up and forgot the wires and had to decloak....

Below 20 degrees the Gerbing gloves don't have enough heat to keep my hands warm indefinitely in the wind. Some sort of additional wind protection is in my future. The Aerostich raincovers work to cut the wind but damn it's a lot of stuff on your hands.
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Capitano wrote:
You'll be severely hampered by heat loss if you don't use muffs or at least hand guards to protect your hands from cold air passing over them.

This will happen whether choosing to heat your palms, the back of your hands or, like I suggested, your body core.
I haven't found that I need anything to block the airflow over my hands when I use my heated glove liners. There are 5 heat settings and even in subzero temperatures I can find a settings that prevents my fingers from getting cold.

I had a pair of muffs that caused damage to the paint of my headset AST they rubbed over the course of the winter. I was very unhappy in the spring when I took the muffs off.
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Benito wrote:
Capitano wrote:
You'll be severely hampered by heat loss if you don't use muffs or at least hand guards to protect your hands from cold air passing over them.

This will happen whether choosing to heat your palms, the back of your hands or, like I suggested, your body core.
I haven't found that I need anything to block the airflow over my hands when I use my heated glove liners. There are 5 heat settings and even in subzero temperatures I can find a settings that prevents my fingers from getting cold.

I had a pair of muffs that caused damage to the paint of my headset AST they rubbed over the course of the winter. I was very unhappy in the spring when I took the muffs off.
What kind of electric glove liners are you using? Would love to have something that kept my hands warm in subzero temps. Are you talking about Fahrenheit or Celsius? I find the Gerbing performance dicey at -9C to -20C.
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Steve, I have the Powerlet glove liners and set to the max setting, the liners are super warm to hot. I have ridden to work in temps. below minus 10°C and had warm finger tips! Because they are liners, the hear is right up against your skin without air pockets. With this direct contact, they can warm without drawing nearly as much power as my heated grips would have.

http://www.powerlet.com/product/rapidfire-heated-glove-liner-kit/542
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DavidH wrote:
frogman_94 wrote:
I now commute 45 miles one way to work and this morning was the first real cold morning. It was between -1C and 3C. I have heated grips but I sure could have used heated gloves. I think it's time in invest in some. My wife as heated gloves (Gerbing) and she loves them.
Crazy Razz emoticon I didn't have the stones to ride this morning but was thinking of youu. I may try it later this week just to see how bad it is.
I only have a 20 minute commute but i was wishing I had heated grips this morning.
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I have heated grips, used them for part of my 10 mile commute each day this week. Morning temps were high 30's F. However, I have a large Cuppini windscreen which blocks direct airflow onto the handlebars and keeps the wind off my core. I've never had the grips on anything other than "low" because they get too hot for me. I'll eventually use my insulated winter gloves, but right now I'm using Alpinestars leather gloves. Please realize that I'm lucky in that I never suffer from cold hands or feet and cold weather, within reason, doesn't bother me. YMMV.
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I am thinking about muffs and ZIPPO hand warmers inside. I keep one in upper internal pocket of my jacket when riding in the cold- it is like having a powerful heater. It uses 0.2oz of lighting fluid for 12 h
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heated grips are like holding on to a warm pipe, heated gloves are like sticking your hand into a warm towel fresh out of the dryer. Which you want depends on how cold it is and for how long. Above 40F heated grips are fine, particularly if you are only out for a half hour or so. Below 40 for prolonged periods tho and you are really going to want a good set of heated gloves. The wires are a bit of a pain tho not nearly as painful are frost bite.
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Re: Heated grips vs Heated gloves
Rusty rope wrote:
Looking at getting something to keep the paws warmer during the winter and can't make up my mind between gloves or grips.

Currently looking at gerbing heated gloves and oxford or symtec heated grips, anyone with experience with any of these? Any other suggestions?

Cheers!
The stock heated grips on the Beemer get me down to 40 degs with my summer gloves on. Any lower and I am using the same T5 Gerbing gloves as Edumaketed has. I agree with him that the batteries are bulky and have limited run time. They work for my 30min commute to work and the return trip while on the medium setting without needing a recharge until I get home.

I believe that Gerbing is launching a new 7volt Motorcycle glove line soon. The run time and bulk of the batteries is supposed to be greatly improved.
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Why are you talking about battery packs? Gloves, vests, pants, soles inserts can be connected to 12 v outlet.
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I'm stuck in this debate myself.

I installed Hot Grips heated grips and a digital heat control (Heattroller) on my Vespa LX150. I had the large Cuppini screen that kept most of the wind off my hands. That solution worked very well for my 20 mile commute down to the freezing point. I had to do a lot of research on the bikes electrical capacity to handle the grips. I had concluded there was just enough capacity and I was right. I never had any electrical or battery issues at all. I posted my research and conclusions on my blog. The link is below in my sig. Just go to the gear posts page, it's easy to find.

Now I find myself without heat for my GTS. I've been asking myself all these questions. If I had gone with Gerbing gloves with my LX I'd still have them.

The great thing about heated grips is that they're always there, and they always work. You don't need to plan. It's true that they don't heat the back of your hands, but I never, ever had to warm my hands after a cold commute.

If I did go the Gerbing route I'd power them off the bike and I'd install a heat troller.

This thread has been very helpful. I'm now leaning to heated grips along with muffs, likely the neoprene ones from Tucano Urbano.

With the large OEM screen, the Tucano Termoscud apron, and the addition of Hot Grips, Heattroller and Tucano Urbano muffs, I think I'll have the perfect cold weather riding solution.
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Capitano wrote:
Here's an alternative view....neither of them!

I'm like Genie and suffer dreadfully with cold-hand-syndrome also possibly Raynauds though I've never been officially diagnosed.

For sure, heated grips + muffs work and so do heated gloves/inners. I've tried both with varying degrees of success....and failure.

What I've found though from riding and from working outside in Winter (self employed electrician, folk ask me to run cables to summerhouses every winter!) is that if you can keep your body core warm and out of cooling airflow, your hands stay warmer than if trying to heat them directly.

So, my weapons of choice these days are:-

1. a screen
2. muffs (if the screen doesn't protect my hands
3. a heated waistcoat (Keis) with a Li-ion battery pack so I can swap from bike to bike if need be and also wear it outside working.

Just my own experience/choice though, so usual caveats apply.
This is sound advice. If your core body temperature starts to drop, the body will cut off circulation to the extremities in order to keep the vital organs warm and prevent heat loss. Keep your core warm and your body won't shut off the blood flow which will keep your hands and feet warmer.
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Gigsy wrote:
Capitano wrote:
Here's an alternative view....neither of them!

I'm like Genie and suffer dreadfully with cold-hand-syndrome also possibly Raynauds though I've never been officially diagnosed.

For sure, heated grips + muffs work and so do heated gloves/inners. I've tried both with varying degrees of success....and failure.

What I've found though from riding and from working outside in Winter (self employed electrician, folk ask me to run cables to summerhouses every winter!) is that if you can keep your body core warm and out of cooling airflow, your hands stay warmer than if trying to heat them directly.

So, my weapons of choice these days are:-

1. a screen
2. muffs (if the screen doesn't protect my hands
3. a heated waistcoat (Keis) with a Li-ion battery pack so I can swap from bike to bike if need be and also wear it outside working.

Just my own experience/choice though, so usual caveats apply.
This is sound advice. If your core body temperature starts to drop, the body will cut off circulation to the extremities in order to keep the vital organs warm and prevent heat loss. Keep your core warm and your body won't shut off the blood flow which will keep your hands and feet warmer.
Yep that's the science of it, summed up better than I could.

Heated gloves & grips treat the symptoms, not the cause.

Yes, they help to keep you hands warm but the body core is still receiving large amounts of cooled blood from the other extremities and if your body's metabolism is unable to supply enough extra heat (through shivering and burning food more quickly for example), your body core temperature will reduce.

Heating them locally, your hands may feel warm, but circulation to the arms, legs and brain are all reduced.

Hence, you will eventually stiffen up, your arms, legs and especially your feet will get cold and you will not be on top form mentally.

If you maintain a high temperature at the core, you maintain circulation to the extremities, hence your hands and feet get a constant supply of warm blood. This may not completely overcome the cooling effect but goes further towards it than warming the extremities themselves. ie your hands and feet may eventually get cold but they don't go numb.

There's no snake oil in that, it's all factual and scientific stuff. The choice is still up to the individual to make though.
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I have Oxford heated gloves and they work really well for me. More comfortable than the heated grips I had on my previous bike so worth the effort of "wiring up" before riding. I do that anyway because I've had a Widder electric vest for many years.

John W.
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Kruella_DV wrote:
<snip>I've had a Widder electric vest for many years.
Have they gone out of business now? The homepage gives that impression.

http://www.widder.com/
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Capitano wrote:
Kruella_DV wrote:
<snip>I've had a Widder electric vest for many years.
Have they gone out of business now? The homepage gives that impression.

http://www.widder.com/
Could well be, I haven't checked. I've just realised I've had mine 20 years now! Oxford do electric vests too. I was impressed with the size and range of their products on the Oxford stand at the recent bike show at the NEC. And that other accessory stands were selling Oxford products.

John W.
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Capitano wrote:
Yep that's the science of it, summed up better than I could.

Heated gloves & grips treat the symptoms, not the cause.

Yes, they help to keep you hands warm but the body core is still receiving large amounts of cooled blood from the other extremities and if your body's metabolism is unable to supply enough extra heat (through shivering and burning food more quickly for example), your body core temperature will reduce.

Heating them locally, your hands may feel warm, but circulation to the arms, legs and brain are all reduced.

Hence, you will eventually stiffen up, your arms, legs and especially your feet will get cold and you will not be on top form mentally.

If you maintain a high temperature at the core, you maintain circulation to the extremities, hence your hands and feet get a constant supply of warm blood. This may not completely overcome the cooling effect but goes further towards it than warming the extremities themselves. ie your hands and feet may eventually get cold but they don't go numb.

There's no snake oil in that, it's all factual and scientific stuff. The choice is still up to the individual to make though.
They do reduce the heat loss and compensate for loss through wind chill etc. Some of it's psychosomatic too as they warm your hands making you feel warmer even if you are still losing core body heat.

I have heated grips on my GS and love them (not fitted yet on my ET4 though) but keeping your core body temp up is definitely the key.

What I'd actually like on the ET though are heated levers as the metal conducts heat away from your hands very quickly and when riding through town, my fingers are covering the brakes for much of the time.

One thing heated grips are good for is warming your gloves so that you can then wipe the ice off your visor (I kid you not!)
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Gigsy wrote:
What I'd actually like on the ET though are heated levers as the metal conducts heat away from your hands very quickly and when riding through town, my fingers are covering the brakes for much of the time.
Not heated but insulated might help.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Black-FOAM-LEVER-BOOTS-SLEEVES-Motocross-Supermoto-Motorbike-Levers-New-/350928421824
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