OP
@gingerman avatar
UTC

Hooked
GTS 300 Dragon Red
Joined: UTC
Posts: 115
Location: Austin, TX
 
Hooked
@gingerman avatar
GTS 300 Dragon Red
Joined: UTC
Posts: 115
Location: Austin, TX
UTC quote
So I got a flat tonight. The temp was probably 35f. I got to the bottom of a hill and stopped to turn right and I could tell I had a flat. On inspection I didn't find ant punctures but it looked like it came off if the bead. Long story short I got air in it and it seems to be holding fine. I didn't notice anything wrong until right then.

I'll be honest, I don't check pressure like I should. Could the cold have caused lower psi and caused the bead to come off?
@aviator47 avatar
UTC

Moderator
2006 PX 150 & Malossi Kitted Malaguti Yesterday (Wife's)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 12955
Location: Paros Island, Greece
 
Moderator
@aviator47 avatar
2006 PX 150 & Malossi Kitted Malaguti Yesterday (Wife's)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 12955
Location: Paros Island, Greece
UTC quote
Here's one person's graph of the relationship between tire pressure and temp.

External inline image provided by member with no explanatory text

It would looks like the difference between about 70F and 35F is only about three PSI, so It wouldn't appear that temp caused the flat.

Of course, that's a tire of a greater internal volume, and I'm way too tired to try to calculate what impact volume might have. There are limits to how hard I am willing to work in retirement.

Here's the full article if you want to do all the calculations. Or take the tried and true approach and reinflate and water test the tire! Watching for bubbles is much easier than math.
@roadster avatar
UTC

Molto Verboso
Kymco AK550
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1163
Location: UK
 
Molto Verboso
@roadster avatar
Kymco AK550
Joined: UTC
Posts: 1163
Location: UK
UTC quote
Re: Cold weather causes flat tires?
GingerMan wrote:
So I got a flat tonight. The temp was probably 35f. I got to the bottom of a hill and stopped to turn right and I could tell I had a flat. On inspection I didn't find ant punctures but it looked like it came off if the bead. Long story short I got air in it and it seems to be holding fine. I didn't notice anything wrong until right then.

I'll be honest, I don't check pressure like I should. Could the cold have caused lower psi and caused the bead to come off?
An ambient temperature change from 65 to 35 degrees F typically reduces gauge pressure readings by 3-4 psi. New tyres usually also lose some pressure as the carcass relaxes.

If your tyres were previously at the correct pressure this is unlikely to cause deflation. But if they were already low then hitting a severe pothole could have done it. Front tyre pressures on the MP3 are specified at only 23 and I have had one deflate to about 12 after hitting a severe obstacle. It didn't come off the rim though.

If you keep monitoring the pressure you might find that you do have a slow puncture or air loss from the valve, bead, or valve seat.
@treppenwitz avatar
UTC

saggezza di scala
2009 'Burma Shave' Red GTS 250ie
Joined: UTC
Posts: 7060
Location: Israel
 
saggezza di scala
@treppenwitz avatar
2009 'Burma Shave' Red GTS 250ie
Joined: UTC
Posts: 7060
Location: Israel
UTC quote
In my, admittedly unscientific research (AKA personal experience), the likelihood of getting a flat is inversely related to how comfortable one would be while changing/plugging the flat or waiting for the flatbed truck.

For example, on a warm sunny day with a comfortable breeze and plenty of nearby shade... there is virtually zero chance of getting a flat.

Bitter cold outside? The chance of a flat starts to climb dramatically.

Throw in truly inclement weather (rain, sleet, snow, etc.) with no shelter in sight, and the likelihood of a flat becomes almost a statistical certainty.

Oh yeah, darkness and the socio-economic make-up of the neighborhood through which you are riding also seem to have a strange influence on the likelihood of a wide range of mechanical failures.
@aviator47 avatar
UTC

Moderator
2006 PX 150 & Malossi Kitted Malaguti Yesterday (Wife's)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 12955
Location: Paros Island, Greece
 
Moderator
@aviator47 avatar
2006 PX 150 & Malossi Kitted Malaguti Yesterday (Wife's)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 12955
Location: Paros Island, Greece
UTC quote
So what you are saying, Trepp, is to buy tires without a situational sensitivity detecting device?
@gogogordy avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
Reprehensible Misinformant
Joined: UTC
Posts: 7575
Location: Winchester, California
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@gogogordy avatar
Reprehensible Misinformant
Joined: UTC
Posts: 7575
Location: Winchester, California
UTC quote
Mr. Murphy?
Treppenwitz wrote:
In my, admittedly unscientific research (AKA personal experience), the likelihood of getting a flat is inversely related to how comfortable one would be while changing/plugging the flat or waiting for the flatbed truck.

For example, on a warm sunny day with a comfortable breeze and plenty of nearby shade... there is virtually zero chance of getting a flat.

Bitter cold outside? The chance of a flat starts to climb dramatically.

Throw in truly inclement weather (rain, sleet, snow, etc.) with no shelter in sight, and the likelihood of a flat becomes almost a statistical certainty.

Oh yeah, darkness and the socio-economic make-up of the neighborhood through which you are riding also seem to have a strange influence on the likelihood of a wide range of mechanical failures.
Mr. Murphy and his silly law.
@rkcoker avatar
UTC

Addicted
Piaggio BV350
Joined: UTC
Posts: 950
Location: Mesquite, TX
 
Addicted
@rkcoker avatar
Piaggio BV350
Joined: UTC
Posts: 950
Location: Mesquite, TX
UTC quote
Re: Mr. Murphy?
gogogordy wrote:
Treppenwitz wrote:
In my, admittedly unscientific research (AKA personal experience), the likelihood of getting a flat is inversely related to how comfortable one would be while changing/plugging the flat or waiting for the flatbed truck.

For example, on a warm sunny day with a comfortable breeze and plenty of nearby shade... there is virtually zero chance of getting a flat.

Bitter cold outside? The chance of a flat starts to climb dramatically.

Throw in truly inclement weather (rain, sleet, snow, etc.) with no shelter in sight, and the likelihood of a flat becomes almost a statistical certainty.

Oh yeah, darkness and the socio-economic make-up of the neighborhood through which you are riding also seem to have a strange influence on the likelihood of a wide range of mechanical failures.
Mr. Murphy and his silly law.
You know HE (WHO WILL NOT BE NAMED) will get you for that!
@judy avatar
UTC

World Traveler
2007 LX150 Daring Plum Leonardo Da Vespa
Joined: UTC
Posts: 29304
 
World Traveler
@judy avatar
2007 LX150 Daring Plum Leonardo Da Vespa
Joined: UTC
Posts: 29304
UTC quote
When it gets hot here our tire pressures seem to be lower but i like Trepp's idea the best. Get some tire pressure sensors. About $149 from Amazon. You get a fob and it tells you the pressure in both tires. You can set high low parameters so it will alarm if the PSI goes under or over. I think your pressure was low to begin with for a while,you hit some bad roads and then overtime it went flat.
@treppenwitz avatar
UTC

saggezza di scala
2009 'Burma Shave' Red GTS 250ie
Joined: UTC
Posts: 7060
Location: Israel
 
saggezza di scala
@treppenwitz avatar
2009 'Burma Shave' Red GTS 250ie
Joined: UTC
Posts: 7060
Location: Israel
UTC quote
Aviator47 wrote:
So what you are saying, Trepp, is to buy tires without a situational sensitivity detecting device?
You used a lot of really long words and a complex conditional clause... so I'll just nod and hope I guessed the correct answer.
@rgconner avatar
UTC

Ossessionato
GTS250
Joined: UTC
Posts: 2959
 
Ossessionato
@rgconner avatar
GTS250
Joined: UTC
Posts: 2959
UTC quote
The more likely cause would be the loss of elasticity of the rubber itself.

The now less elastic in cold weather would tend to tear instead of conforming around whatever you ran over.
@aviator47 avatar
UTC

Moderator
2006 PX 150 & Malossi Kitted Malaguti Yesterday (Wife's)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 12955
Location: Paros Island, Greece
 
Moderator
@aviator47 avatar
2006 PX 150 & Malossi Kitted Malaguti Yesterday (Wife's)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 12955
Location: Paros Island, Greece
UTC quote
Treppenwitz wrote:
You used a lot of really long words and a complex conditional clause... so I'll just nod and hope I guessed the correct answer.
Now you sound like Mrs Av!
OP
@gingerman avatar
UTC

Hooked
GTS 300 Dragon Red
Joined: UTC
Posts: 115
Location: Austin, TX
 
Hooked
@gingerman avatar
GTS 300 Dragon Red
Joined: UTC
Posts: 115
Location: Austin, TX
UTC quote
Thanks for the replies, and laughs, everyone. Ya, I think I'm just bad on checking the pressure. Funny thing is today my brother in law asks what I want for Christmas. I sent him a link to the Orange M202 TPMS on Amazon.
@judy avatar
UTC

World Traveler
2007 LX150 Daring Plum Leonardo Da Vespa
Joined: UTC
Posts: 29304
 
World Traveler
@judy avatar
2007 LX150 Daring Plum Leonardo Da Vespa
Joined: UTC
Posts: 29304
UTC quote
Your going to LOVE the tire pressure sensors. Happy Holidays.
@hernesage avatar
UTC

Hooked
'13 BV350 Black
Joined: UTC
Posts: 276
Location: Denver
 
Hooked
@hernesage avatar
'13 BV350 Black
Joined: UTC
Posts: 276
Location: Denver
UTC quote
In my experience what usually happens is the temp change (not just lower temps) that causes the tire to lose pressure. Here in Denver we have gone through some major changes over the last month. All that expansion and contraction is quite likely to cause air loss because it seeps around the bead until it warms up enough to re-seal.

I also ride year around and when its 3F and I go to work its only 2 miles - not enough to heat up the tire. However I park it in the sun instead of leaving it in the garage, you get the idea.

In the summer temp change doesn't seem to affect tire pressure much. Winter seems to be a different story. I blame the loss of the tire's elasticity and the resulting compromise to the bead seal.

Oh and the various goop sold to keep your tire sealed have no effect on this because they never get near the problem area.
DoubleGood Design banner

Modern Vespa is the premier site for modern Vespa and Piaggio scooters. Vespa GTS300, GTS250, GTV, GT200, LX150, LXS, ET4, ET2, MP3, Fuoco, Elettrica and more.

Buy Me A Coffee
 

Shop on Amazon with Modern Vespa

Modern Vespa is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com


All Content Copyright 2005-2024 by Modern Vespa.
All Rights Reserved.


[ Time: 0.0180s ][ Queries: 3 (0.0062s) ][ live ][ 313 ][ ThingOne ]