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I have my free weekend and I'm planning on replacing the belt and rollers on my ET4. Finally!

I have in my posession:

1.) a Malossi Kevlar Belt
2.) a clutch tool
3.) a variator tool
4.) a set of stock rollers
5.) a workshop manual
6.) Permatex Threadlocker Blue
7.) bookmarks of every thread on the subject I that I could find on MV
8.) The "special" fridge in the basement in stocked. Razz emoticon
(Only to be opened upon successful completion of the job)
9.) a camera, so if I get it right, I can do it again.

I have never owned a torque wrench in my life, but I know I'm going to need one now. So, I'm off to Sears...any suggestions on which specific wrench to get?

I also have Home Depot, Advance Auto, and a Pep Boys store close to me.

And I'll need a 19mm socket...right?

Is there anything I am missing?

I'm hoping to be prepared as possible to do this job, which I hear is supposed to be relatively easy, but for some odd reason, has me nervous.

Also, I found this link on one of the threads that should have a video of the process, but I have never been able to get it to work.
http://naturesruntime.com/mvworkshop/
Is there anywhere else I can find it?

Thankee
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UTC quote
Its really easy....just clean all the parts and REMEMBER how it came apart....

The blue thread lock is for the frightened/anal.......I have never , ever, not even once heard of a varator or clutch coming loose.....but if you will 'feel' better using it, no harm will it cause....

These really are simple machines.....

You will love the way she rides after you clean everything out and renew the bits.......kinda like 'new tennis shoes'.....lol

Good luck,

R

8)
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[redacted]
⚠️ Last edited by jess on UTC; edited 1 time
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2010 Dragon Red GTS 300 Super, 2018 Grigio Titanio Piaggio Liberty S 150
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Good luck, and may the force be with you!
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i'm doing the same thing this weekend on my et4 too. a friend is actually going to do it for me, but i'm going to watch and take notes so i know what to do next time. this is the 2nd set of rollers in less than two thousand miles, so i'm ditching the athena variator and going back to the stock one.

lesson learned-buy the mallossi variator next time.
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Re: OK..Belt and Rollers ready to go...
Menhir wrote:
I have never owned a torque wrench in my life, but I know I'm going to need one now. So, I'm off to Sears...any suggestions on which specific wrench to get?
Here's my 2c on your torque wrench situation... Get the "beam" type torque wrench. It will be less fancy than the "clicky" type where you dial in your setting, but it will also, 1) be less expensive, 2) last a lifetime, 3) won't ever need calibration, and 4) will be as dead-nuts accurate as you need for a job like this. Not to mention that, when compared to the comparable offerings from outfits like Snap-On, the Craftsman "click" Tq wrench is a p.o.s. - why drop $100+ on it, then, when you can get the job done for under $30?

You're not assembling the space shuttle! I went for 3 years working on my cars without a torque wrench, and finally caved in and bought one "just 'cause." I hardly ever use it.

A wise mechanic once told me, "Far fewer things have been ruined from under-tightening as from over-tightening."

FWIW, this is a beam torque wrench: (in case you've never seen one)
http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?cat=Mechanics+Tools&pid=00944690000&vertical=TOOL&subcat=Torque+Wrenches&BV_SessionID=@@@@0253415666.1186795699@@@@&BV_EngineID=ccdgaddljjkkledcefecemldffidfno.0

Just make sure to match the wrench to your sockets i.e., 3/8" drive or 1/2". While you're at Sears, buy an extension set - doubtful you'll need it for this job, but the first time you DO need an extension and you already have it, you'll smile knowing you don't have to leave the job and head to the store.
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UTC quote
Re: OK..Belt and Rollers ready to go...
Menhir wrote:
I have my free weekend and I'm planning on replacing the belt and rollers on my ET4. Finally!

I have in my posession:

1.) a Malossi Kevlar Belt
2.) a clutch tool
3.) a variator tool
4.) a set of stock rollers
5.) a workshop manual
6.) Permatex Threadlocker Blue
7.) bookmarks of every thread on the subject I that I could find on MV
8.) The "special" fridge in the basement in stocked. Razz emoticon
(Only to be opened upon successful completion of the job)
9.) a camera, so if I get it right, I can do it again.

I have never owned a torque wrench in my life, but I know I'm going to need one now. So, I'm off to Sears...any suggestions on which specific wrench to get?

I also have Home Depot, Advance Auto, and a Pep Boys store close to me.

And I'll need a 19mm socket...right?

Is there anything I am missing?

I'm hoping to be prepared as possible to do this job, which I hear is supposed to be relatively easy, but for some odd reason, has me nervous.

Also, I found this link on one of the threads that should have a video of the process, but I have never been able to get it to work.
http://naturesruntime.com/mvworkshop/
Is there anywhere else I can find it?

Thankee
Once you get this completed (and your scoot still functions of course) maybe you should put on a "change the belt and rollers" seminar for us Ohio/P.A. guys and gals I'll gladly lend my BV200 and a 12 of Guinness Razz emoticon

Bob
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UTC quote
Let me amend my previous answer by saying that I was too stupid to notice you're doing this on an ET4. Please disregard everything I said, as I've never taken apart an ET4 transmission and have little idea what's the same and what's different.

Sorry...
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UTC quote
glasseye wrote:
The blue thread lock is for the frightened/anal.......I have never , ever, not even once heard of a varator or clutch coming loose.....but if you will 'feel' better using it, no harm will it cause....
wow really... apparently you dont have to many bodgy mechanics in your area... ive come across a few bikes that "others" have worked on and the whole drive train just comes lose and comes apart...

loctite is your friend...
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Quote:
I'll gladly lend my BV200 and a 12 of Guinness
Mmmmmmm...Guiness Razz emoticon

I'll being doing this all today, with camera in hand, after I get the required hubby/daddy chores out of the way.

Thanks for all the help.

Quick question: I'm picking up a 3/8" torque wrench today...and anything else I don't have.

Does anyone know what size the nut is for the driven pully is?
(It looks like a 3/4" socket will work, but I'm sure it's metric)
and what size the 1/2 pulley/crankshaft nut is?
(I think I heard 18mm. My current set only goes up to 17mm)
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OK....The job is on hold for a bit.

One of the screws holding the air filter is frozen and is not coming out. I was able to resolve this by removing the front of the air filter and the remaining screw, thus getting enough clearance to remove the case.

But the variator tool from Motorsport is way off. It just doesn't fit. I don't have a dremel to fix it, and I'm a bit pissed that I need to spend time fixing a tool that was supposed to make the job faster anyway. I have heard reports of this problem several times before. I just figured that it would have been fixed by now.

Hopefully I'll figure out something by the time I get back from Sears.
@marc avatar
UTC

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06 GTS250. 00 Yamaha Vino airsal 70cc. 01 ET4 (wrecked). 67 Lambretta Vega125. 48 Beam Doodlebug Super. 1915 Board Track replica 80cc
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@marc avatar
06 GTS250. 00 Yamaha Vino airsal 70cc. 01 ET4 (wrecked). 67 Lambretta Vega125. 48 Beam Doodlebug Super. 1915 Board Track replica 80cc
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UTC quote
I've changed the rollers on our ET many times.
(I wish I had changed the belt more often!)
The best tool I have for this job is an electric socket wrench gun.
I picked it up at Harbor Freight for under $40, I also got
a set of sockets for it at H.F. 13mm up to about 30mm for $12.
It makes getting the rear spindle nut and the main variator nut off
a 2 second job (it takes longer to get the tool out and plugged in!)
I also use it to replace the nuts, but that's me and I don't think others
would recommend it.
I have never had a problem though.
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Success! At least so far. I drove it around the block with no problems, but I have to take the family (who was patiently waiting for me) out to the mall now.

I'll take a longer ride tomorrow.

I'll post some pics and do a write up of my little adventure, too. asap.
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UTC quote
I own a Craftsman clicky torque wrench. It works great if you're trying to apply decent amounts of torque. The click is very easy to feel. If however you're trying to apply light torque, it's easy to miss the click, and torque the fastener to death.

Regardless of the kind that you buy, buy top quality. Cheap tools aren't worth the powder to blow them away. Ask a decent mechanic what brand they would suggest. Commercial tools are expensive, but worth every penny.

MHO.

C
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masssheltie wrote:
Ask a decent mechanic what brand they would suggest. Commercial tools are expensive, but worth every penny.
If you use them enough to justify, your absolutely right
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OK, here's how it went down on my 2004 ET4

I took some pics, but gosh darn, the info I got on the forum from other threads on this forum was so spot on that I felt like had almost done this before. Especally, this thread:

Variator & Belt change - Pictures from MV workshop

So to avoid being redundant, I'm going to do a simple run-through and post pics to clear up things that I was yet still confuzzed on before I started. Here goes: (Remember...2004 ET4)

Remove the lower plastic cowl and carefully pry off the plastic Piaggio clutch nut cover.

Use the clutch holder tool to remove the clutch nut. There is a washer behind the nut. I didn't notice it there and until I removed it, the CVT cover was snagged on it. I don't know what the metric size of the nut is, but a 3/4" socket was snug and did the job. Still, I would prefer to get the right size for next time.

Remove the big Phillips Head screws holding the air filter case so it can be moved up out of the way.

Remove the 8mm bolts holding the CVT cover in place.
One of the bolts will also be holding a cable clip, another will have a wire attached. Make sure you put these back when you reassemble everything. There is also a large hose going into the front of the cover. I removed it so I could set the cover aside. You might want to have a plastic zip tie on hand to reattach it later.

Remove the dipstick and replace it after the cover is off to keep anything nasty from falling into the oil.

After you wrestle the CVT cover off, watch out for any errant washers! There is a large, thick washer that goes on in front of the clutch bell (pic). Make notes as to where all the washers go to aid reassembly.

Put the variator tool on as shown. (pic) You will need one of the 8mm cover bolts to secure the lower end.

Using 18mm deep well socket (and the judicious use of a BRT: Big Rusty Tube, which I slipped over the end of my 3/4 driver for extra leverage, I was easily able to remove the nut holding the variator on.

An aside: I bought an extender for the 3/8" driver, but it isn't necessary if you use a deep well socket. Also, I was told that using an extender with a torque wrench may throw off the readings a bit, too.

Rock the outer plate of the variator off. First, there will be a ratchet-type washer for the kick-starter and a paper thin washer behind that. There is another washer behind the outer plate. Make sure you know where these go!

Remove the tubular bushing and the variator plate. If you can get your fingers around it, there is another back plate behind this half that holds the rollers in place...you may be able to get it off in one piece while holding it together. If things fall apart, don't sweat it. It's not hard to figure out.

Now here is where I was confuzzed and where the other threads ended, so
Lay this assembly down and you can see how the rollers are orientated.
The back plate looks like a small dish, and will have three horseshoe shaped guide shoes. The rollers and the guide shoes can fall off and out easily, but you will be able to tell how they go back together. (pic)

After installing the rollers (be careful of their orientation, which is discussed in the other threads), put the back plate onto the back half of the variator, holding everything together with your fingers, and you should have no trouble getting it back on in one piece. (pic)

Make sure the bushing is back in place.

Get the new belt ready. You should orient it so the words Malossi (I was installing a Malossi Kevlar Belt) can be read right-side-up as you look at it. You can, with some effort, pull the clutch pulleys apart and slip the belt down in there to give enough play to slip the other end over the bushing at the variator end. Note: You can't pull them straight apart, they will "rotate" as you pull them. You'll see.

Put the washer and the outer variator ramp back on and make sure the belt is not binding anywhere. Make sure everything is pushed on snugly.

Using the variator tool, a torque wrench, and some blue loc-tite/permatex, replace the nut holding the variator assembly on.
Per my manual: 55.3-61.2 Ft.Lbs.

Put the cover back on, then torque on the clutch nut (washer first) the same way.
Per my manual: 39.8-44.2 Ft.Lbs.

Put everything else back.

A couple of notes:
The tool that holds the variator didn't line up properly. I picked up a round bastard file at Sears and filed the hole out a bit after which it worked just fine. It didn't take long to do, but if you are using this tool, you should be aware that this is something you may have to deal with the first time you use it. By the way, I am not going to hack on Motorsprort Scooters for this. Yes, it was a pain, but only a minor one, and you only have to fix it once. Motorsport: Younz guys are great.

One of the things an ET4 has is a kick-start. I was worried about this as it was not addressed in the other threads. As it turned out, If your kick starter is in good working condition, don't worry about it. It will go right back on without any muss or fuss.

Write everything down, take notes. Watch how the washers come off and write it down so you can get the back correctly.

Don't do anything for the first time if you are in a hurry.

OK. If I made any mistakes or omissions, or if anyone can add anything enlightening, have at it. Thanks.
How to work in the sun outdoors, and why my dog can't ride with me. :-(
How to work in the sun outdoors, and why my dog can't ride with me. :-(
Rollers, Guides, backplate..all assembled.
Rollers, Guides, backplate..all assembled.
Variator, backplate, rollers, guide shoes (1 removed) and bushing
Variator, backplate, rollers, guide shoes (1 removed) and bushing
Variator tool in place.
Variator tool in place.
Clutch Bell and washer.  Always watch for washers, you don't want to lose any or put them back wrong.
Clutch Bell and washer. Always watch for washers, you don't want to lose any or put them back wrong.
The old belt and rollers with 8300+ miles on them.  They look fine to the eye, which just proves that a visual inspection isn't enough.
The old belt and rollers with 8300+ miles on them. They look fine to the eye, which just proves that a visual inspection isn't enough.
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By the way...read the pics from the bottom up.
(or stand on your head, if you like. ...no wait...forget it.)

When I previewed my post, everything showed in the wrong order, so I reversed the order so the preview showed correctly, but when it posted, it was in the wrong order again. Next time, I'll know what to do. Sorry about that.
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UTC quote
I would get a impact wrench to get the bolt off....If you don't have a compressor, get the 12 volt one from Harbor Frieght....Made my job easier...
⬆️    About 3 years elapsed    ⬇️
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UTC quote
Will be changing the belt this weekend. I will video tape the process and hopefully post the video on YouTube. Look for it soon...

So, I have a BV200 with 24,550 miles. I have never replaced the belt, as each time I check it it is within the factory specs (width wise, also no cracks or irregularities)

I do ride the bike quite soft (accelerate softly) and I only weight 135 lbs. Had it full throttle maybe twice...

I ride 30+ miles each day and 1/3 of it Highway miles.



Hey, I'm not suggesting you try this... but it is possible! These are great machines!!!

Thanks for the posts!!!!
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UTC quote
iroscioli
We've learned since this thread was born in 2007 to NOT use the Malossi belts since they are very prone to premature failure. Use the OEM Piaggio belt only.
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Bear in mind that this thread was started almost three years ago.

I had no problems with the Malossi belt, but based on all the scuttlebutt I heard since then, I've switched back OEM belts.
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