@amateriat avatar
UTC

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2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody: 2015-2021, RIP), 2022 GTS SuperTech (Thelonica; bit the dust 02-22-23)
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Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
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@amateriat avatar
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody: 2015-2021, RIP), 2022 GTS SuperTech (Thelonica; bit the dust 02-22-23)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 3924
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
UTC quote
Ah, as I could've predicted, there's scarcely a bad bit of advice in this entire thread. The non-helmet-related advice (take a riding class, preferably using someone else's bike) is solid. It'll sharpen up your skills, and at the very least, help keep your shiny new ride shiny and new-looking longer.

On the helmet-buying front, I just purchased my second lid, via RevZilla, and I do recommend them if for some reason finding a dealer close enough, with a decent selection of brands and models, isn't possible.

The helmet I replaced - HJC's CL-17 - is in fact a great full-face helmet for the bucks (<$150 in solid colors), is both DOT and Snell rated, and I strongly recommend it for anyone on a tight budget but concerned about overall quality. The main reason I replaced it was that, going on three years' use, it was getting more than a tad beat up.

Among the things I was looking for in a new lid were lighter weight, reduced wind noise and better ventilation in warm/hot weather. Given your location, I think the last feature might be even more of a biggie for you than me. Here's how my buying adventure went:

First Impressions: HJC RPHA 70 ST Helmet

As always, YMMV. Fit and overall comfort are seriously important, because an uncomfortable helmet can be distracting, and distraction while riding is clearly not a good thing.

Best of luck, have silly-good fun with that very cool ride, and check in often - as you've likely already figured out, we're a rather cool crew here.
⚠️ Last edited by amateriat on UTC; edited 1 time
@expaladin avatar
UTC

Member
2006 LX150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 42
Location: Northeast Ohio
 
Member
@expaladin avatar
2006 LX150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 42
Location: Northeast Ohio
UTC quote
Hi MaryAlex. Tons of good advice here, as you can always expect from this group -- I'm still a newbie here, and I've already learned a ton from the members and the archives.

I just went through this, so let me share my newbie thoughts:

1) As others have said, go try on some helmets first before you buy one. Once you narrow down what you want, and pinpoint your size, you can probably find it online at a better price. I'd never ridden before, or worn a helmet other than one of those cyclist skullcap types, and when I first tried on a helmet, I felt really claustrophobic. You learn fast that the right size for you will feel pretty tight at first -- but they need to, because you don't get protection from a helmet that bounces around on your head. Think of it like a pair of shoes -- if they're too big, they're likely to fall off when you most need them to stay on. They really do break in after only a few rides.

2) I say go for the full face. You get the best protection. From everything I read, the most likely part of your face to hit the ground in an accident is your chin. Why not protect it? You only have one face. I originally thought I'd go with a three-quarter, or even a modular -- but after I did my research and read the forums here, I opted for full-face and I'm happy about it. It broke in nicely, and it's not uncomfortable at all while riding; at stops, when it heats up, I just flip up the visor and get some air, and then flip it back down when I'm ready to take off.

3) Make sure it's got a good rating. I went with this one because it was full face, SNELL rated and on sale. I'm happy with it. At first I was a little bummed bc it didn't fit under my seat, but there's a hidden helmet hook beneath the seat of the LX150, connected right to the body, so you can hang your helmet by the D-ring on the chinstrap, and then close the seat to secure it.

4) Get one you aren't going to get sick of looking at. I found a lot of the helmets I looked at that I originally thought were cool started to look funny the more I compared them to others. And the ones I thought were really classy just tended to be really expensive. In the end I went with a red one to match my scooter, and decided I'd live with the design elements, bc is was a good deal. As it turns out, I've gotten used to it, and it's not nearly as busy as I thought it would be.

Take your time shopping, but don't obsess (like me) -- when you find one that you like, with a good safety rating, in your price range, go for it.

Safe riding!

Ex.
@scooterraton avatar
UTC

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2 - Many
Joined: UTC
Posts: 3164
Location: Boca Raton, Florida
 
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@scooterraton avatar
2 - Many
Joined: UTC
Posts: 3164
Location: Boca Raton, Florida
UTC quote
I always suggest that people that are not familiar with buying helmets go to a good shop that has someone that can fit you.

A new helmet may feel too tight...and just need breaking in. It may feel great but actually be too loose...you don't know what you don't know!

To me it's worth it to pay a little more to a shop.
UTC

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Piaggio BV250
Joined: UTC
Posts: 2429
Location: Historic Route 66 in Oklahoma
 
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Piaggio BV250
Joined: UTC
Posts: 2429
Location: Historic Route 66 in Oklahoma
UTC quote
As Guzzi Gal posted above, Revzilla is an excellent online retailer for helmets, and even helmet information and guidance.......and.... they give out Zilla Bucks!!!!
UTC

Ossessionato
X10 350
Joined: UTC
Posts: 2959
Location: London
 
Ossessionato
X10 350
Joined: UTC
Posts: 2959
Location: London
UTC quote
Web Bike World is a great place for reviews. They talk about head shapes in their reviews (some helmets just will not work for you if you have the wrong head shape). They also talk about noise (loud helmets are more tiring on long rides, and can damage your hearing).

Yes, you can order lots online, and then keep returning them until you find on that you think fits, but really for your first helmet I'd say there's no substitute for making a trip to a real shop and trying on a load, with some advice from a real human being who's got lots of experience.

You pay more for light weight, better materials (both inside and out), removable linings (I wouldn't buy a helmet that didn't allow me to take the insides out to wash them), better sound reduction....and marketing/"coolness" of the brand. It's up to you what combination of these things you're willing to pay more for.
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