Wed Aug 11, 2021 2:37 pm

Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2078
Location: Central Pennsylvania
 
Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2078
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Wed Aug 11, 2021 2:37 pm linkquote
MiguelATF wrote:
I have been a serious fan of both your writing and your photography for some time, Steve.
But amongst the very large gallery of wonderfully resonant photographs and images that you have produced - and (thankfully!) continue to keep creating - I find this image - this view of your Vespa standing out in a field, on an oh-so-cloudy day, with everything (light, clouds, the road, the textures, the gradations, the subtle range of shadows) contributing to a whole which, for me, surpasses the sum of its constituent parts.

Short version: what a great photo!

Thank you for continuing to share your images and words here. They tend to inspire me on some days, entertain me on others, and almost always generate moments of introspection.
Thank you for your kind words about the photograph and the things I post on Scooter in the Sticks. To say it's an labor of love is an understatement. The reality is the Vespa, and now a motorcycle as well, have become an essential part of my life. Riding has opened doorways to experience, expression, and a kind of enlightenment. The Three Es!
Tue Aug 24, 2021 2:34 pm

Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2078
Location: Central Pennsylvania
 
Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2078
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Tue Aug 24, 2021 2:34 pm linkquote
Wandering through the central Pennsylvania countryside on my way to breakfast at an Italian cafe and market. This old church has always intrigued me as I've watched it for four decades slowly decline. No more services held here. It's just waiting for a death or a rebirth. Not sure which.


My 2006 Vespa GTS 250ie alongside an old wooden church.

Wed Aug 25, 2021 4:17 am

Molto Verboso
1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 (sold) / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T /Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 1097
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
 
Molto Verboso
1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 (sold) / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T /Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 1097
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Wed Aug 25, 2021 4:17 am linkquote
You won't see the scooter in the pic. I'm standing beside it.

I left early so I could swing by the lake before work. The rowing crew from EGR was already out practicing.



Thu Sep 02, 2021 7:09 pm

Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2078
Location: Central Pennsylvania
 
Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2078
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Thu Sep 02, 2021 7:09 pm linkquote
I have begun to sense a subtle shift in the light that has me thinking of autumn. The summer has flown by and I've spent far too little time on the scooter. The intense heat is my excuse but I suspect a healthy dose of laziness is more responsible.

Whenever I see the round bales start to pile up in the pastures I think summer is over. Not sure why since they bale them almost year round.


Vespa GTS 250ie scooter out standing in a field.

Fri Sep 03, 2021 6:00 am

Molto Verboso
1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 (sold) / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T /Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 1097
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
 
Molto Verboso
1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 (sold) / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T /Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 1097
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Fri Sep 03, 2021 6:00 am linkquote
Ah, yes. One of the fields where Kellogg grows their "Frosted Mega-Wheats".

It's important for people to know where things come from. No farms = no food.
Fri Sep 03, 2021 7:20 am

Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2078
Location: Central Pennsylvania
 
Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2078
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Fri Sep 03, 2021 7:20 am linkquote
seamus26 wrote:
Ah, yes. One of the fields where Kellogg grows their "Frosted Mega-Wheats".

It's important for people to know where things come from. No farms = no food.
This stuff is going straight into cows to make milk. Most of the crops in Pennsylvania go to animal feed. Some areas produce potatoes, tomatoes, and other human food crops but nothing to rival corn and soy beans.

I fear we'll see some drastic changes in farming and the availability of water intensive crops grow in the West over the next 20 years. Water will be king.
Fri Sep 03, 2021 10:10 am

Molto Verboso
1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 (sold) / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T /Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 1097
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
 
Molto Verboso
1979 P200E (sold) / ZNEN Amore 150 (sold) / Genuine Buddy 170i / Genuine Stella 4T /Aprilia Sportcity One 50
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 1097
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Fri Sep 03, 2021 10:10 am linkquote
VESPAsfw3 wrote:
This stuff is going straight into cows to make milk. Most of the crops in Pennsylvania go to animal feed. Some areas produce potatoes, tomatoes, and other human food crops but nothing to rival corn and soy beans.

I fear we'll see some drastic changes in farming and the availability of water intensive crops grow in the West over the next 20 years. Water will be king.
Growing up on a small farm, we always had either alfalfa or corn or soybeans growing in the field. Some of my earliest memories are sunny days out behind the tractor baling hay. The chaff would stick to your sweaty skin and itch like crazy. I can still taste the iced tea Mom used to make for us. We always baled the small rectangular bales. The farmer that worked our field, Donny, had a baler, but we had to stack them on wagons and then later in the hay loft.

One of my first jobs was turning the hay bales over so they could dry on all sides. When I was done, Donny gave me two quarters. I can still see them in the palm of my hand. His hand was so much bigger than mine, but I couldn't have been more than six.

Donny was my first hero. Tall, skinny, sandy haired and covered in freckles. He was built like a scarecrow. I remember one day being full of myself carrying those bales one at a time from the wagon to the barn. Then I saw him grab two in one hand and throw them over his shoulder into the hay loft. Farmers are made of different stuff.

I shared both of those stories with his daughter, Jennifer, a few years ago because I couldn't make it to the funeral. She shared them with everyone.

I have much respect for farmers and the work they do. It's hard, endless and unappreciated. I probably wouldn't do it again myself, but I have a great appreciation for the blood, sweat and tears that go into farming.

Think I need to listen to some Mellencamp.
Sat Sep 04, 2021 9:19 am

Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2078
Location: Central Pennsylvania
 
Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2078
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Sat Sep 04, 2021 9:19 am linkquote
seamus26 wrote:
Growing up on a small farm, we always had either alfalfa or corn or soybeans growing in the field. Some of my earliest memories are sunny days out behind the tractor baling hay. The chaff would stick to your sweaty skin and itch like crazy. I can still taste the iced tea Mom used to make for us. We always baled the small rectangular bales. The farmer that worked our field, Donny, had a baler, but we had to stack them on wagons and then later in the hay loft.

One of my first jobs was turning the hay bales over so they could dry on all sides. When I was done, Donny gave me two quarters. I can still see them in the palm of my hand. His hand was so much bigger than mine, but I couldn't have been more than six.

Donny was my first hero. Tall, skinny, sandy haired and covered in freckles. He was built like a scarecrow. I remember one day being full of myself carrying those bales one at a time from the wagon to the barn. Then I saw him grab two in one hand and throw them over his shoulder into the hay loft. Farmers are made of different stuff.

I shared both of those stories with his daughter, Jennifer, a few years ago because I couldn't make it to the funeral. She shared them with everyone.

I have much respect for farmers and the work they do. It's hard, endless and unappreciated. I probably wouldn't do it again myself, but I have a great appreciation for the blood, sweat and tears that go into farming.

Think I need to listen to some Mellencamp.
I've spent some time throwing bales of hay onto a wagon, enough to know that I am glad someone finds satisfaction in such work.

Having spent almost 40 years working for the College of Agricultural Sciences at Penn State I have had endless opportunities to witness farming first hand -- from dairy farmers rising early on Christmas Day to milk cows to people sheering greenhouse grown edible flowers and lettuce for upscale restaurants. Every farming pursuit required a surrender to a rhythm of living that is challenging, unique, and definitiely not for everyone. I'm grateful that we have the food supply we do, have some trepidation of the future, and pray that our leaders come to understand the old proverb that only 7 meals stand between peace and revolution.
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