Sat Jun 05, 2021 10:38 am

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Sat Jun 05, 2021 10:38 am linkquote
What Swiss Says^

If you use too thick - it will be a nightmare to squish when you turn the flywheel - and if it is too thin - it won't squish at all.
When measuring with calipers - use the section that is just past the super thin section - as the super thin tips will cut right into the solder in my experience.
Sat Jun 05, 2021 10:41 am

Member
Vespa T5 251, Lambretta GP200
Joined: 27 Jul 2019
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Location: Leeds, England
 
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Vespa T5 251, Lambretta GP200
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Posts: 43
Location: Leeds, England
Sat Jun 05, 2021 10:41 am linkquote
You can use 1mm solder, just twist a couple of strands tightly. I never use a head gasket unless really needed or the heads that have the sealing ring. Lapped and loctite is the way to go for me.
Sat Jun 05, 2021 10:44 am

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VSX, Stella 177, VNX1T, V9B1T
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Sat Jun 05, 2021 10:44 am linkquote
Lynnb wrote:
Thanks Swiss I donít know what to expect when I shove a length of solder in the spark plug hole so didnít want to shove a size in there that is too large in diameter and doesnít give accurate squish reading.
Might I ask what squish size information actually helps determine in tuning a carb? Like is there some special formula that it drops into or something?
Well i can't speak to sticking solder down the plug hole cause Ive just removed the head and taped solder in place to check. Sticking down the plug hole seems like the potential for inaccuracies is too high for my ocd.

As far as what squish suggestions, i think it's based on your port timings and desired performance. The kits probably give suggested squish for pnp, but for tuning i don't know enough about squish yet to make a suggestion. Better to hear from Jack or some of these other more knowledgeable guys who will probably offer advice.
Sat Jun 05, 2021 11:17 am

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Sat Jun 05, 2021 11:17 am linkquote
Thanks guys for the insight , Iím finding this really interesting, nice when you can learn something.
Sorry Swiss didnít mean to mess with your ocd.

Buddy of mine thatís a retired engine machinist had just called me because heís quite interested in the Vespa Iíve been bringing back to life, I had asked him about squish seeing as I had him on the phone and he had said the original term for squish was actually quench, and part of the reason was for rod flex at rpms , he had explained he use to do the same thing but also not through the spark plug hole but before assembly but had also did it through the spark plug hole at times when it was more warranted rather than pulling a top end off. He did find it strange there is no head gasket, mind you Iím assuming there is no head gasket on these DR180 kits . Can anyone confirm my thoughts just to set me straight?
Sat Jun 05, 2021 3:16 pm

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Sat Jun 05, 2021 3:16 pm linkquote
I got some solder wire , is 3mm getting 2.97 mm down to 2.87 mm does this sound right ? I brought piston upto Tdc and slid the solder down the face to meet the cylinder and held it there and gave about 5 kicks. I tried rolling up some thinner wire but results werenít very accurate.
Thanks











Sat Jun 05, 2021 3:42 pm

Hooked
1959 Allstate w P125x Engine
Joined: 29 Nov 2020
Posts: 131
Location: Los Angeles
 
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1959 Allstate w P125x Engine
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Location: Los Angeles
Sat Jun 05, 2021 3:42 pm linkquote
qascooter wrote:
Thanks for the info Swiss - I have no idea the squish. It's the Pinasco 2-port 177 kit. I've been assuming they dialed that in before selling the kit. Maybe I should rethink that assumption and Get the solder out and pull the head....
Don't pull the head.
Watch this video from 7:30 on.
Important note:
He's using zinc soldering wire, not welding wire.
Zinc is very soft.
Sat Jun 05, 2021 3:56 pm

Hooked
1959 Allstate w P125x Engine
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Sat Jun 05, 2021 3:56 pm linkquote
Lynnb wrote:
No Swiss I had GickSpeed build this engine complete back in 2012 and just started it last year. Can you torque more than recommended torque spec?
That seems like a long time to have seals and such sit around.
I'm in the same boat. Got the rubbers, etc rebuild kit at the ready.
Sat Jun 05, 2021 3:59 pm

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Sat Jun 05, 2021 3:59 pm linkquote
Ray8 wrote:
Don't pull the head.
Watch this video from 7:30 on.
Important note:
He's using zinc soldering wire, not welding wire.
Zinc is very soft.
Thanks Ray thatís how I did my squish test, Iím think I have as much clearance as I stated.
Sat Jun 05, 2021 6:35 pm

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76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
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Sat Jun 05, 2021 6:35 pm linkquote
I think that Jennings explains how to determine target squish, or you can get fancy tools like Torqsoft that will calculate it and tell you what your squish should be based on stroke, compression, port timings, etc.

In general, you want to be around 1mm. My 210 I just built (57mm crank) has a squish of 1.15. My hotrod LML motor had a squish of 0.8mm, which was what BGM recommended for a 60mm crank with a 177.

I think the real question is how deep into the weeds you want to go on this stuff.
Sat Jun 05, 2021 9:05 pm

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79 P200E, 62 Allstate, 2008 Stella
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Sat Jun 05, 2021 9:05 pm linkquote
Excellent - Thanks Ray8. I just watched the vid and will check the squish tomorrow.

The guy on the vid was saying 1.25mm was too small and 1.5mm was the target he was after. Is this what your 177 kit is set at or is it more like CM1 and closer to 1mm.

I don't know what the port timings is on our VNBs. I just know we put in performance 57mm cranks, opened up both sides of the rotary pad a bit, and flowed the carb and box.

We'll see what I've got tomorrow.
Sat Jun 05, 2021 11:44 pm

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Sat Jun 05, 2021 11:44 pm linkquote
swiss1939 wrote:
Well i can't speak to sticking solder down the plug hole cause Ive just removed the head and taped solder in place to check. Sticking down the plug hole seems like the potential for inaccuracies is too high for my ocd.

As far as what squish suggestions, i think it's based on your port timings and desired performance. The kits probably give suggested squish for pnp, but for tuning i don't know enough about squish yet to make a suggestion. Better to hear from Jack or some of these other more knowledgeable guys who will probably offer advice.
I think I may have to try it your way with removing the head and tape a small diameter solder more rolled up in place , the number Iím getting is too high I think. Iím also thinking the only way to lessen the amount of squish would be to lap the head or have it machined. I need a definitive number for sure to start with so I can give the correct information. Now my ocd is kicking in. Who knows maybe thereís a head gasket under the head.
Sun Jun 06, 2021 11:01 am

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Sun Jun 06, 2021 11:01 am linkquote
For what it's worth.. I still don't fully get how to figure out the appropriate squish!
Jennings wrote:
Squish Bands

Ricardo solved the problem, once he had determined its nature, by lowering the
underside of the cylinder head in that part of the chamber over the piston. Thus, most of the mixture was concentrated right at the ignition source, and would be more likely to burn without detonating. The small part of the mixture caught between the cylinder head's squish band and the piston was still subject to compression heating, but was fairly effectively shielded from radiation and was, moreover, spread in such a thin layer that it would resist ignition from any cause - as it would lose heat into the relatively cool piston and cylinder head too fast to ignite.

That still is the secret of the squish-type cylinder head: It concentrates the main
charge in a tight pocket under the spark plug, and spreads the mixture at the cylinder-bore's edges too thinly to be heated to the point of ignition. These ďend gasesĒ do not burn with the main charge, and are only partly consumed as the piston moves away from top center and releases them from their cooling contact with the surrounding metal. And right there is the disadvantage that comes with the squish-band cylinder head, for mixture that does not burn is mixture that contributes nothing to power output. Of lesser importance, though only in this context, is that those end-gases contribute heavily to the release of unburned hydrocarbons out the exhaust pipe and into the atmosphere, and for that reason automobile manufacturers are now relying much less heavily on squish-band chambers for combustion control. You may be interested to know, too, that in many cases a non-squish combustion chamber, with its complete utilization of the mixture to offset the power-limiting effects of a necessarily-lower compression ratio, has proven to be best in absolute terms of power and economy. McCulloch, for example, make engines with both squish and non-squish cylinder head configurations - having found that both have their applications.

Our application here, of course, is strongly biased toward maximum horsepower,
and that points toward a squish-band head - which is what you will have in most motorcycles in any case. I will warn you, now, that it may be unwise to follow the old-time tuner's habit of increasing an engine's compression ratio as an opening gambit in the quest for better performance. Indeed, before your work is done you may find it necessary to reduce your engine's compression ratio below the stock specification. You see, in the final analysis it is not so much compression ratio as combustion chamber pressure that determines the limit - and these are not at all the same things. Your stock engine, with a carburetor size and porting chosen to lend it a smooth idle and easy starting, does a much less effective job of cylinder-filling than will be the case after it has been modified. More important, it will probably have an exhaust system that has more to recommend it as a silencer than as a booster of horsepower. These factors, in combination, make a very great difference between the cylinder pressures at the time of ignition in the stock and modified engine. Even given a certain willingness on your part to use a fairly cold spark plug - changing it frequently - and a further willingness to replace pistons and bearings more often in payment for added power, it may still be necessary to stay with the stock specification for compression ratio. Or, as I have said, to lower the engine's compression ratio from the stock condition. This last will be particularly true if you succeed in creating a much better than stock exhaust system.

By and large, you would be well-advised to ignore the whole business of compression ratios in favor of cranking pressures. There is, after all, a big difference between the kinds of numbers you get by performing the traditional calculations to find compression ratio, and what is happening as the engine turns. My experience has been that you can use cranking pressures of 120 psi without worrying much about overheating anything. Maximum power will be obtained at cranking pressures somewhere between 135 and 165 psi. Going higher with compression, in a conventional motorcycle engine, can give a neat boost in low speed torque, but the thermal repercussions of higher cranking pressures will surely limit maximum output. On the other hand, fan-cooled kart engines perform very well at cranking pressures up at 200 psi, and water cooled engines behave much the same.

One of the most undesirable side-effects that come with too-high compression
ratios is an enormous difficulty in getting an engine to "carburet" cleanly. When the
compression ratio is too high, you'll find that an engine's mixture-strength requirement has a sharp hump right at its torque peak that no motorcycle carburetor can accommodate. You'll realize, after working with high-output two-stroke engines, that all of them are to some degree liquid-cooled - and that the cooling liquid is gasoline. It is true that an over-rich mixture tends to dampen the combustion process, and reduce power, but here again we find ourselves faced with the necessity for finding a balance between evils: We have overheating to rob power on one side, and we can cool the engine with gasoline, but too much fuel also robs power. The solution is a beggar's choice, in which we try to find the cross-over point between overheating and over-rich mixtures.

In an engine intended purely for road racing, with a torque peak virtually coincidental with its power peak and driving through a very close-ratio transmission (enabling the rider to hold engine-speed within narrow limits), making this beggar's choice is a fairly straight-forward proposition: you play with jetting until the motorcycle runs fast. However, road racing conditions allow you to stay right on the mixture-
requirement hump; you don't have to worry about what happens two-thousand revs below

the power peak, because that's below what you'll use in a race. Motocross racing is
another matter entirely, and an engine with a mixture-curve hump will drive you
absolutely mad. Jet a motocross engine so that it doesn't melt a piston every time it pulls hard at its torque peak, and (if its mixture-curve is humped) it will be huffing soot and losing power above and below that speed. The answer to this problem is to iron out that mixture-requirement hump, because no matter how much work you do with the carburetor, it never will be able to cope with the engine's needs. All the carburetor knows, really, is how much air is moving through its throat, and it adds fuel to the air in proportion to the rate of air-flow; don't expect it to know when the piston is getting hot and respond by heaving in some more fuel. How do you get rid of the hump? You do it mostly by substituting a somewhat less effective expansion chamber: one that gives more nearly the same boost all the way through the speed range you are obliged to use by racing conditions, without any big surges. That will result in a drop in peak power, obviously, but you can compensate for it to a considerable extent with the higher compression ratio you previously were forced to
forego in the interest of keeping the piston crown intact when the expansion chamber did its big-boost routine. Again, it is all a matter of finding the balance.

No matter what the compression ratio you ultimately use, it will have been
influenced much more than you probably suspect by the combustion chamber
configuration, and by certain gross characteristics of the head itself. Over the years, I
have seen the fashion in combustion chamber forms swing back and forth, hither and yon, with first hat-section chambers in favor and then trench-type chambers, and torus-type chambers and so on and so forth ad infinitum. I was not, and am not, impressed. Combustion chamber form should be established with an eye toward only a very few special considerations, and these cannot account for even half the chamber shapes I have seen. Listed - though not really in order of importance - these are: surface to volume ratio; spark plug location; thermal loadings; and combustion control. We will consider each of these in turn.

Surface to volume ratio is important because even in the part of the combustion
chamber fully exposed to the advancing flame front, there will be a mixture layer
adhering to the metal surfaces that does not burn. These layers, like that trapped within the squish band, are cooled by their proximity with the cylinder head, or piston, and simply never will reach ignition temperature. And, like the end-gases from the squish band, they eventually find their way out the exhaust port, having taken no part in the conversion of fuel and air into horsepower. Thus, the best combustion chamber shape - taken strictly from the standpoint of surface/volume ratio - would be a simple spherical segment sweeping in a continuous arc from one side of the cylinder bore to the opposite side. No tricky changes in section, no squish bands, no nothing. And that is, in point of fact, precisely the shape employed in nearly all non-squish cylinder heads. But if you want to use a true (measured from exhaust-closing) compression ratio much over 6.5:1, on a high-output engine, combustion control beyond that afforded by a non-squish cylinder head will be necessary. Considerable variation is possible, but a good rule to follow is to make the cylinder head's squish band about 50-percent of the cylinder bore area. For example, in a 3-inch bore - which has a total area of 7.07-inches2 the squish band would be wide enough to represent an area of just about 3.5 in2.

Assuming that you have centered the combustion chamber proper on the bore axis, then your squish band would be a ring having the same outer diameter as the bore, and an inner diameter of just over 2-inches. The combustion chamber itself, to meet the previously-stated minimum surface/volume requirement, would again be a spherical segment - with a radius that provides the total volume, added with that from the clearance space between piston and squish band, to give the desired compression ratio.

The clearance space between piston and cylinder head must be enough to avoid
contact at high engine speeds, yet close enough to keep the mixture held there cooled during the combustion process. This vertical clearance between squish band and piston should not be greater than 0.060-inch (1.5mm), and it is my opinion that the minimum should be only barely enough to prevent contact - usually about 0.015-inch in small engines (with tight bearings and cylinder/rod combinations that do not grow, with heat, disproportionately) and up to about 0.045-inch in big engines.
Some disagreement exists as to the validity of claims that the squish band aids
combustion by causing turbulence in the combustion chamber as a result of the piston "squishing" part of the charge between itself and the head. I don't know about that, but I do know that holding squish band clearance to a minimum means that there will be the smallest volume of end-gases escaping the combustion process, and that can be more important than you might think. For example, a 250cc cylinder with a full-stroke compression ratio of 10:1 will pack its entire air/fuel charge into a volume of only 28cc by the time its piston reaches top center. Assuming that it has a 3-inch bore, and a 50-percent squish band with a piston/head clearance of .045-inch, then the volume of the charge hiding in the squish area will be in the order of 2.6cc, or almost 10-percent of the total. That can be reduced to 5-percent merely by closing the squish band's clearance to 0.020-inch - and you'll never find an easier 5-percent horsepower difference. True, the difference measured at the crankshaft might prove to be more like 2-1/2-percent, but the addition of those small percentages can make a very large final difference.
Sun Jun 06, 2021 1:07 pm

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Sun Jun 06, 2021 1:07 pm linkquote
Thanks Swiss for the reading material
Mon Jun 07, 2021 8:42 am

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Mon Jun 07, 2021 8:42 am linkquote
Iím going to pull the head and see if I can lap it down some and do some measuring off the cylinder to piston and measure the head and do the math. Do I have to replace the base gasket on the cylinder or will it be fine as long as I donít lift the cylinder off itís seated position?
Wed Jun 09, 2021 5:10 pm

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Wed Jun 09, 2021 5:10 pm linkquote
Before deciding to shave down the head I decided play with the jetting a bit more. As it stands I have the I had tried 140 Be3 116 50-120and was able to hit 60mph no problem , changed to 140 Be5 118 and felt rich so back to 140/be5/116 and today connected the extension for the trail tech and went for a ride and a plug chop at 50mph. Seems ok hitting 50 to over 60 ( needle is over 60 ) , temperature at 50-55 is reaching 275 F and if I dip back down to 40 ish temperature is dropping. loop. It actually feels good at a steady 50 mph plus . Has more on the throttle if I twisted it at 55 , not choking at all. To tell the truth I really donít know what Iím looking for out of this little 2 stroke .

Edit had wrong temperature


Pic taken in sun lite with iPhone





Thu Jun 10, 2021 3:52 pm

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Thu Jun 10, 2021 3:52 pm linkquote
Today I decided to flip the channels a bit and try GickSpeeds recommended stack 160/Be3/116 and did a plug chop at 55 mph and before heading out did a compression test and got 125psi cold wot. So first thing I noticed was it was very crisp through the gear range right from first to forth. I got it upto 60 mph and it ran smooth , I figured I was at the end of the throttle but it had a lot more twist on the wrist, motor felt very happy. Only one down fall when I was doing a steady cruise of 55mph , temperature was creeping upto 293F. After a mile and a half of holding the speed I clutched and killed the motor. Keep in mind I donít have a air filter in the 20/20 carb and the piaggio filter should be here next week and I expect it should richen up the carb and hopefully bring down the temperatures at the higher speeds some, so we will see. Also still running the 55/120 with a 1-3/4 mixture screw turnout.
One other thing, I had a hell of a time getting the bike restarted after the plug chop shutdown, at first I thought maybe the kill button was stuck in but I had spark and figured Iíd see a wet plug from trying to also start with choke pulled but plug was dry.











Fri Jun 11, 2021 4:45 pm

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Fri Jun 11, 2021 4:45 pm linkquote
Does this sound right , maybe itís always been sounding like this , I donít know.

Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:22 pm

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VSX, Stella 177, VNX1T, V9B1T
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Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:22 pm linkquote
what octane gas are you using?
Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:33 pm

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79 P200E, 62 Allstate, 2008 Stella
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Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:33 pm linkquote
Is it my imagination or is there some piston slap going on in there? Hmmmm.
Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:41 pm

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Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:41 pm linkquote
qascooter wrote:
Is it my imagination or is there some piston slap going on in there? Hmmmm.
There is something pingy and tinny sounding i think. It reminded me when i first ran my tuning kit and used low octane gas when it called for premium octane, and left the ignition timing at the stock too advanced setting. Corrected both of those and the out of place rattle sounds went away.

But i could just be imagining it, and it's just how his exhaust, kit, or cell phone audio recording sounds.
Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:49 pm

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Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:49 pm linkquote
swiss1939 wrote:
what octane gas are you using?
Highest I can get 92.
Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:52 pm

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Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:52 pm linkquote
Swiss I donít know , but someone thatís had the DR kit may recognize it as sounding normal, the sound on my phone is pretty much what it sounds like .I have heard they are noisy, been like this since first running.

Scott itís hard to say.
Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:57 pm

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Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:57 pm linkquote
Lynnb wrote:
Swiss I donít know , but someone thatís had the DR kit may recognize it as sounding normal, the sound on my phone is pretty much what it sounds like .I have heard they are noisy, been like this since first running.

Scott itís hard to say.
It's probably just how they sound. I've never heard a dr kit before.

Other than that, it sounds good. Not hearing any distinct dirty spots.
Fri Jun 11, 2021 8:05 pm

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Fri Jun 11, 2021 8:05 pm linkquote
Swiss do you think the revs are returning to idle quick enough? Mixture screw set right?
It is running very good.
Sat Jun 12, 2021 8:12 am

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Sat Jun 12, 2021 8:12 am linkquote
I liked this video a lot, even though I'm dealing with my SI carb right now, because while the bulk of this video is about tuning side draft carbs, the basic process is the same in any case:

1) Tune the mid-range
2) Tune the idle
3) Tune the main jet

- Always start rich and work your way down
- If you're not sure if you're rich or lean, go richer and make sure it gets worse

This is pretty much what Jack says, too.

Sat Jun 12, 2021 8:32 am

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Sat Jun 12, 2021 8:32 am linkquote
Chandler yes I have watched this video well most of it , I lost interest in it when trying to convert the ranges over to my si carb. Iím actually interested in some day converting to a cv type carb.
Sat Jun 12, 2021 9:34 am

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Sat Jun 12, 2021 9:34 am linkquote
This is an interesting topic on temperatures and thereís also a link that explains well. Thought Iíd add it to my research and developments.
This is the well explained link page

https://resources.savvyaviation.com/understanding-cht-and-egt-2/

Might as well add plug reading

https://www.strappe.com/plugs.html

Oppsclunkthud PDF on egt cht works PDF

http://oopsclunkthud.com/tuning/gauges.pdf

Max safe cylinder head temp
Sat Jun 12, 2021 10:23 am

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PX221 MHR, O tuned PX200, PX125 and some motorbikes
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Sat Jun 12, 2021 10:23 am linkquote
chandlerman wrote:
I liked this video a lot, even though I'm dealing with my SI carb right now, because while the bulk of this video is about tuning side draft carbs, the basic process is the same in any case:

1) Tune the mid-range
2) Tune the idle
3) Tune the main jet

- Always start rich and work your way down
- If you're not sure if you're rich or lean, go richer and make sure it gets worse

This is pretty much what Jack says, too.

Pretty much what I say indeed. Better results this way around though.
0) Tune the air corrector
3) Tune the main jet
1) Tune the mid-range
2) Tune the idle
4) Repeat from 3) until its perfect

SI carbs have a sequence like no other.
Sat Jun 12, 2021 10:45 am

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Posts: 3177
Location: Staten Island, NY
Sat Jun 12, 2021 10:45 am linkquote
Jack221 wrote:
0) Tune the air corrector
3) Tune the main jet

SI carbs have a sequence like no other.
In the past few days I've kinda grabbed hold of the first step by adopting a similar approach to your idle swap method, where you leave the a/f screw set to what you want it, and change the idles until it is correct at that screw setting.

I don't know how useful it is for those whose engines run better on much leaner jettings but mine really seems to be way thirstier than I have been thinking at wot.

So my recent method has been to choose the largest main jet I would ever want to use on the main stack, and leave that as the constant similar to the a/f screw. Then start seeking wot bog by using that biggest mj on the leanest air corrector I have.. 160ac. Run it, look for wot bog at high rpm, if no bog, leave the atomizer and mj same and swap to next leanest air corrector, 140. Keep repeating until you find it bogging at wot.

I chose to use 140mj as the largest mj I would ever want to use, because Jack has mentioned in the past that once you get over 140mj the carb just doesn't work right. I've also tried so many combinations all over the place both smaller mj sizes around 110-120 and 130-140. I felt like my bike just ran smoother in the higher range between 125-135, so I wanted my main jet ideal target to be somewhere around that.

Started on 160/be3/140. no bog.
Switched to 140/be3/140. no bog.
Switched to 120/be3/140. no bog.
Switched to 110/be3/140. BOG.

So I guess this is a way to tune the air corrector as you mentioned. But if you wanted your mj to be around a 120 or so, you could set 130mj as your bog target for finding the correct AC for it. It's really dependent upon where you are looking to get your target mj to be.

Now I've moved on to trying to find the correct mj on that stack by walking down the mj. Currently at 110/be3/130 and might be a little lean.

Its never ending!
Sat Jun 12, 2021 8:06 pm

Ossessionato
79 P200E, 62 Allstate, 2008 Stella
Joined: 11 Jan 2006
Posts: 2165
Location: Florence, OR
 
Ossessionato
79 P200E, 62 Allstate, 2008 Stella
Joined: 11 Jan 2006
Posts: 2165
Location: Florence, OR
Sat Jun 12, 2021 8:06 pm linkquote
swiss1939 wrote:
Its never ending!
Yeah, I hear that!
Sun Jun 13, 2021 8:26 am

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1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2511

 
Ossessionato
1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2511

Sun Jun 13, 2021 8:26 am linkquote
swiss1939 wrote:
It's probably just how they sound. I've never heard a dr kit before.

Other than that, it sounds good. Not hearing any distinct dirty spots.
GickSpeed said it sounds ok to him so good to go.
Sun Jun 13, 2021 8:33 am

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1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2511

 
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1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2511

Sun Jun 13, 2021 8:33 am linkquote
Hey Swiss nice write up and documentation of your steps, I actually understand what youíre doing and makes perfect sense. Are you doing your steps with an air filter in the carb? Which plug are you using?
Sun Jun 13, 2021 9:31 am

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VSX, Stella 177, VNX1T, V9B1T
Joined: 20 Jul 2018
Posts: 3177
Location: Staten Island, NY
 
Ossessionato
VSX, Stella 177, VNX1T, V9B1T
Joined: 20 Jul 2018
Posts: 3177
Location: Staten Island, NY
Sun Jun 13, 2021 9:31 am linkquote
Lynnb wrote:
Are you doing your steps with an air filter in the carb? Which plug are you using?
Gick is the pro. He knows better than most what it should sound like. Ignore my comments about the sound as I commented off experience with one engine. Who knows how many thousands of engines he's worked on! Some day it would be nice to know a quarter as much as him!

B7 plug. No air filter at all.
Sun Jun 13, 2021 12:58 pm

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1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2511

 
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1963 VBB2T
Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 2511

Sun Jun 13, 2021 12:58 pm linkquote
Swiss I know heís the pro , I just didnít want to bother him. But he confirmed and I had heard they are a noisy top end but didnít know what that meant. Learning something new every day is the goal.
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