63 GL: First Bodywork adventure
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Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Sun Mar 07, 2021 6:31 pm quote
Just a smallish pancake compressor and a couple of cheap HPLV sprayers I got off Amazon when I did my boat.

Nothing fancy, but it gets the job done.
Ossessionato
62 VBB1T Round Tail W/ leaner sidecar
Joined: 26 Jan 2019
Posts: 2241
Location: california
Sun Mar 07, 2021 6:49 pm quote
Gracious - the moment of bare metal.
Lookin good CM.
Love a sunny cool day for some vespa work.
Super honest beer at days end.
Molto Verboso
2007 Stella 225
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 1683
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Mon Mar 08, 2021 3:49 am quote
You need a tent to paint in.
Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Mon Mar 08, 2021 5:42 am quote
I forgot to photograph & mention it yesterday, but once the paint & schmutz were gone in the wheel well, I think I found the VIN.

On the inside of the well, there's a stamping of "1GM2878.0M," which may be cut off by the grinding.

And the back side of the VIN, after I zoomed, upped the contrast, and flipped things around, looks like "VLA1T 050360," which according to ScooterLounge, is too many digits, so either it's 50360 or 05036. 5036 would be a 1962 GL, but 50360 would be a '63, which would match the production year on the motor and, given that would be a late '63 model, probably makes the most sense.

So I think I now have a VIN, but that won't do me any good if it's still listed as stolen.

Anyone have access to a stolen vehicle registry lookup? I'd prefer to do it without having to go back to the TN DMV if I can avoid it.

Here's the full-size original photo of the VIN if anyone wants to have their own go at cleaning it up.


This is just a number stamped in the frame. No clue what it is


Zoomed & mirrored




Is that a VIN I spy?

Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Mon Mar 08, 2021 8:37 am quote
And I may be back in business, VIN-wise.

Per https://www.nicb.org/vincheck, VLA1T0000000050360 and VLA1T0000000005036 both check out clean.

So it may be time for another trip to the title office
Molto Verboso
2007 Stella 225
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 1683
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Mon Mar 08, 2021 9:54 am quote
chandlerman wrote:
I forgot to photograph & mention it yesterday, but once the paint & schmutz were gone in the wheel well, I think I found the VIN.

On the inside of the well, there's a stamping of "1GM2878.0M," which may be cut off by the grinding.

And the back side of the VIN, after I zoomed, upped the contrast, and flipped things around, looks like "VLA1T 050360," which according to ScooterLounge, is too many digits, so either it's 50360 or 05036. 5036 would be a 1962 GL, but 50360 would be a '63, which would match the production year on the motor and, given that would be a late '63 model, probably makes the most sense.

So I think I now have a VIN, but that won't do me any good if it's still listed as stolen.

Anyone have access to a stolen vehicle registry lookup? I'd prefer to do it without having to go back to the TN DMV if I can avoid it.

Here's the full-size original photo of the VIN if anyone wants to have their own go at cleaning it up.
You can try rubbing it lightly with a white crayon or tire marker also.
bodgemaster
63 GL, 76 Super (x 2), 74 Primavera (x 2), 06 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 5830
Location: So Cal
Mon Mar 08, 2021 12:21 pm quote
FWIW, I think the last number in the VIN is ď8Ē

So .... VLA1T 050368. Donít know if that helps or not.
Addicted
'64 Motovespa 150S (177) , '66 Allstate SF, '65 VBB, '66 180SS
Joined: 27 Mar 2013
Posts: 870
Location: S.Salem, NY
Mon Mar 08, 2021 12:30 pm quote
I second the 8.
Hooked
Joined: 08 Sep 2011
Posts: 371

Mon Mar 08, 2021 12:35 pm quote
Sorry if you already know this. The IGM number is the Italian part number. What you have matches what's in the Vespa Tecnica book.

I've bought a scooter where the previous owners had it registered using the IGM number as the VIN. Doh!

https://www.scooterhelp.com/serial/igm.html#:~:text=The%20IGM%20number,do%20with%20the%20serial%20number.



Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Mon Mar 08, 2021 5:31 pm quote
SoCalGuy wrote:
FWIW, I think the last number in the VIN is ď8Ē

So .... VLA1T 050368. Donít know if that helps or not.
Well, VLA1T0000000050368 is also not stolen, so these are all good options
Banned
2:6
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Posts: 7732
Location: San Francisco
Mon Mar 08, 2021 8:10 pm quote
there is a method of using acid to highlight the stress in the metal on the ground off side.

https://www.evidencemagazine.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=366
Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Sun Mar 21, 2021 5:12 am quote
Yesterday, I decided that it was time for a push to paint, so I decided to just Go For It. I did a final sand, etch, wash, and prime on all the body panels and frame.

I also had to build up a quick paint booth, so I hung plastic sheeting stuck an air filter on a box fan. Not ideal, but it got the job done.

I only had time to shoot one coat, but that's not the end of the world because I have a few spots to clean up where I seem to have not quite gotten the etching residue fully cleaned off on one of the cowls and I forgot to paint the inside of the glovebox door. Doh.

I used 20 oz of paint with a 1.4mm gun, which wasn't quite enough so the inside of the frame didn't get a good coat. For the second coat, I'm not going to paint both sides at once, so I'll catch it up then. I only did everything at once because I didn't have enough time to do it right and wanted to get a first coat on everything.

This was a big psychological step, because it finally gets me past a lot of worries about prep work and seems to have turned out mostly OK. It highlighted spots where I will do a little more hammer work before the next coat, too.

All-in-all, progress feels GOOD.



Ossessionato
62 VBB1T Round Tail W/ leaner sidecar
Joined: 26 Jan 2019
Posts: 2241
Location: california
Sun Mar 21, 2021 7:06 am quote
And you thought your wife was annoyed when you put the cases in the dishwasher?

Looking good CM!
What color are we going to paint this thing?
Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Sun Mar 21, 2021 8:19 am quote
It's going to be a gunmetal gray.

Originally, I was thinking blacked-out chrome, but I've since changed my mind and am going to go no trim on the cowls or mudguard, but keep silver chrome on the legshield beading, headlight bezel (I have the OG SIEM), tail light, levers, etc.

And I'm keeping the VespaGL logo in the state I found it, other than a little bit of polishing.



Ossessionato
79 P200E, 62 Allstate, 2008 Stella
Joined: 11 Jan 2006
Posts: 2098
Location: Florence, OR
Sun Mar 21, 2021 8:38 am quote
Ohhh - This should look cool
Hooked
79p200e 66smallstate 85pk50xl 84p125ets 63GL
Joined: 24 Nov 2016
Posts: 277
Location: Flatness, TX
Sun Mar 21, 2021 9:55 am quote
Been watching... still subscribed!!
Looks great!



Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Tue Mar 23, 2021 7:18 pm quote
I moved things along another notch tonight. I sanded off and cleaned up all the mistakes in the first primer coat, then shot a second coat on everything.

Things went on much better this time. I'm getting a better feel for how to control the gun, plus I wasn't in a hurry.

Now, it's time for filling and sanding so we can get on to the real paint.




A drip at the top, but I cleaned up a fair amount.

bodgemaster
63 GL, 76 Super (x 2), 74 Primavera (x 2), 06 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 5830
Location: So Cal
Tue Mar 23, 2021 7:41 pm quote
Coming along nicely... Thatís the beauty of sandable primer, you can make all the spraying mistakes you want and just sand em out.
Hooked
PX 200
Joined: 25 May 2016
Posts: 275

Tue Mar 23, 2021 8:12 pm quote
chandlerman wrote:
I moved things along another notch tonight. I sanded off and cleaned up all the mistakes in the first primer coat, then shot a second coat on everything.

Things went on much better this time. I'm getting a better feel for how to control the gun, plus I wasn't in a hurry.

Now, it's time for filling and sanding so we can get on to the real paint.
So great to see paint jobs...!

Depending on the finish youre after, but try get rid of all the dents and bends in the panels best you can...

If youre after something smooth and youre going to clear coat it, it saves a tons of work with the filler/filler primer etc... if not they'll show up, or youll spend a ton of time using filler and sanding to get a semi-even finish...

Ask me how i know...

Last years quick "patch up" paint job, rust was sinking in too deep in a lot of areas, so had to quickly sort it out before it got really bad







Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Wed Mar 24, 2021 4:42 am quote
SoCalGuy wrote:
Coming along nicely... Thatís the beauty of sandable primer, you can make all the spraying mistakes you want and just sand em out.
So much truth and goodness about that, SoCal. I cleaned up all my mistakes, plus shot the fresh coat and cleaned everything up in about an hour and fifteen minutes. Only used 12 oz of paint this time, so a lot of wastage. I meant to mix 16oz, wound up mixing 20 by accident after I overpoured. But since I'm now onto the next stage, I don't feel bad about it other than the principle.
108 wrote:
So great to see paint jobs...!

Depending on the finish youre after, but try get rid of all the dents and bends in the panels best you can...

If youre after something smooth and youre going to clear coat it, it saves a tons of work with the filler/filler primer etc... if not they'll show up, or youll spend a ton of time using filler and sanding to get a semi-even finish...

Ask me how i know...

Last years quick "patch up" paint job, rust was sinking in too deep in a lot of areas, so had to quickly sort it out before it got really bad
That's amazing you were able to do that with the bike still together. It's tricky enough to get right with everything fully torn down. My hat's off to you for that!

You saw the state of rust in places on this thing when I started, so at this point, I feel like I know a thing or two about rust, even if I don't yet know how to weld so I can just cut it out and fix it right.

For paint, I'm going with a two-stage, so yes on the clear coat. I went back and forth a little bit, but ultimately decided I wanted the more modern finish and deep lustre.

As to paint...before you joined the forum, I think, one of my other projects was a complete resto-mod of a 1962 runabout. That was also a complete teardown and rebuild, along with an electric conversion. I had to re-fiberglass the entire hull and I used single-stage marine paint. Even with HOURS of filling and fairing, I'm still not entirely satisfied with how it turned out some days, but I know a lot more now than I did when I started that project.

Getting over the metal prep hump and into shooting that first coat of primer was a big psychological step for me on this project, because I'm now into something I've done before. I had a few issues, like the spots where I didn't get the acid residue completely washed off, but that's all now over and done with and I'm ready to get started on the fairing and sanding.


Before...


...after.

That entire hull is new material that I built up a smooth surface over fiberglass matting and sanded...and sanded...and sanded...and sanded some more.

Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Fri Mar 26, 2021 6:23 pm quote
Last night, I got busy with the body filler and sandpaper. I finished up a last few spots this evening, then shot two coats of high-build primer.

I think the pressure on my gun was a little low, so the the finish has more texture than it should, but I think it'll be OK since it's all got to be sanded down anyway.

Assuming that all goes well, I might actually paint tomorrow!




Floorboards looking a lot better than the last time we saw them...


Low pressure on my gun? I forgot to dial it up and didn't stop to think when it was going on rough.



bodgemaster
63 GL, 76 Super (x 2), 74 Primavera (x 2), 06 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 5830
Location: So Cal
Fri Mar 26, 2021 8:15 pm quote
Donít forget to make sure the floor railís fit before you shoot paint
Molto Verboso
2007 Stella 225
Joined: 02 Nov 2019
Posts: 1683
Location: Rochester, Minnesota
Sat Mar 27, 2021 9:01 am quote
I think that's what's referred to as orange peel. I've done that finish on purpose when texturing drywall in my garage to cover up mistakes and being lazy.

https://pittsburghsprayequip.com/how-to-stop-and-fix-orange-peel-when-spraying-paint/
Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Sat Mar 27, 2021 10:45 am quote
Yep. Orange peel, it was. I was using the same pressure as for non-building primer, which is a lot thinner than the high-build. Nothing that five hours of sanding didn't set right.

Now, it's time lunch, then surface prep, then primer, then paint.

And thanks for the reminder to check the floor rail fit before I painted, SoCal! I probably would have forgotten even though I've told myself about a hundred times not to forget about it. #tunnelVision
Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Sun Mar 28, 2021 6:33 pm quote
SoCalGuy's GL build thread was the classy, teasing burlesque build thread, teasing with glimpses that hinted at what was to come. My GL build thread, on the other hand, is more like the all-nude bar out on the highway by the truckstop, leaving nothing to the imagination.

So for those who might be wondering what I've been up to, the answer is fortunately not "drowning in a flash flood."

Instead, I was out in the workshop moving this project forward. After a looooong day of sanding, cleaning, then re-priming, I shot two coats of base coat and a coat of clear coat last night. That was a mistake.

I didn't let things harden enough, so I wound up with glove marks in the base coat. Then, to make matters worse, I didn't re-check my gun after mixing the second batch of clear coat and made a complete mess of the legshield. Massive drips everywhere. There were cinnamon rolls looking at those drips and thinking, "What a mess."

So I packed it in, went back in the house, and lost power twenty minutes later until long after I'd gone to bed.

This morning, I headed back out to survey the damage. A mix of clearcoat dripping from too much paint and glove marks in the base coat. Time to wet sand. And wet sand. And wet sand some more. Then I got to clean, and finally was ready to try again.

This time, I did a few things differently. First, I had clear plan for what order I was painting things in, and where I was going to put them after I did. The headset, shift tube, glovebox door, and spare tire holder came outside the paint booth to dry, freeing up room since the space was really too small.

Second, I turned the needle all the way in, then backed it out and adjusted the needle, air pressure, and spray width until I got to a setting I liked. And I reset it after every paint change, including mixing more of the same color. This may be Painting 101, but it was a revelation once I added that to my technique.

Third, if the paint isn't going on "right," like I saw with my orange peel, I should have stopped, wiped it off as best I could, then figured out why it was not shooting right. When it comes to paint behaving after it's laid down, Hope is not a Strategy.

And finally, I left plenty of time between stages so I couldn't accidentally mess something up by handling paint that wasn't suitably hardened yet.

And when all was said and done, I'm pretty happy with the results other than maybe the legshield, where you can still see some of the cinnamon roll drips, despite my sanding and re-base coating. Maybe in time I'll embrace it as a souvenir of this project. Or maybe I'll grind the whole thing down and do it from scratch again. Jury's still out on that point.

So what have I learned thus far?

One of my key takeways from this experience is that with paint and body work, if you look at something and have to ask yourself, "Will that be visible after I finish?" the answer will always be, "Yes."

Another lesson learned is that if things start going south, just stop, remove whatever paint you can, then figure out a path forward. Just stop until the paint catches up. If it's a drip, deal with it. It's infinitely easier to wet sand a spot where you wiped a drip than to sand down that drip after the fact. I didn't save anything on my ultimate timeline, but I could have saved a fair amount of paint and a lot of misery if I hadn't tried to drive through to hit an arbitrary schedule.

I Still need to shoot some more paint on the insides of the cowls, the mudguard, and the bottom of the frame, but the important (i.e. pretty) parts are done.

A quart of base coat was plenty. A quart of DTM Epoxy Primer was about right. I'm going to need another quart of clear coat for the underbody and insides of the panels.

Was it satisfying to get to this point? Absolutely. Would I do it again? Quite possibly.

Now let's get to the pictures...


The legshield after lots of sanding to fix the orange peel.


In which the clear coat does its best Frosted Cinnamon Roll impersonation.


LOTS of sanding and a fresh layer of base coat later.


And now we're getting somewhere


Look at that metal flake in the sun!


Panels, panels, panels


I was framed!

bodgemaster
63 GL, 76 Super (x 2), 74 Primavera (x 2), 06 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 5830
Location: So Cal
Sun Mar 28, 2021 7:17 pm quote
Ha! Attaboy Chandler, way to show that urethane whoís boss! The flake looks deluxe.

Crazy how many variables there are when it comes to pulling off a decent spray job, ainít it? Nozzles, pressure, distance, angle, temperature, getting the right chemical mix, timing between coats, etc etc... lots of luck too. You kept your cool when things went sideways and it turned out well.

Different part of the brain from wrenching, for sure, but equally satisfying.
Ossessionato
79 P200E, 62 Allstate, 2008 Stella
Joined: 11 Jan 2006
Posts: 2098
Location: Florence, OR
Sun Mar 28, 2021 9:03 pm quote
Wow CM, way to pull it off. You're a good storyteller. Myself, and probably everybody on this forum have probably gone through the "push through" and jack it all up, then step back and figure a way forward.

I like the analogy of the strip club next to the truck stop - pretty much my style too. Sometimes it's not pretty, but such is life.

The paint looks AWESOME! I learned some things from your post, so thank you.

I've only shot single stage, so cleaning a gun and doing clear afterwards makes me nervous. I'm thinking this summer of painting the lower portion of our motorhome - in the driveway - with all the elements intact (wind, bugs, etc). Single stage seems easier and maybe what I'll do.

Again, good job!


She really needs all that faded grey painted - maybe a deep blue, but not glossy...

Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Mon Mar 29, 2021 6:46 pm quote
SoCal, yes, there are a ton of variables, and only a couple of them (component ratios, pressure, and tip size) are even documented. A lot of it is just patience and diligence.

I watched a BUNCH of youtube videos from Eastwood ("hands on cars" were some of the better ones, I believe) and learned a lot from them about the sequencing of steps. There was a strong message throughout about the importance of consistent diligence with cleaning and prep, attention to detail, and preparing for every step of the process ahead of time. Every time I cut a corner on any of those, or took the wishful interpretation, I got burned.

I still have some drips to wet sand and other areas that the clearcoat is thinner than I'd like, so, I'm going to shoot another coat over everything for that. Plus, the where it wraps under to the floorboard still needs a decent amount of work, but since it'll all be exposed once I flip the frame, I can deal with that at the same time as I clearcoat the underbody and life is good. Ditto the insides of the cowls.

Even though it won't be perfect, it's close enough for me. I thought the color would be a little bit darker, but I still like it a lot and feel a lot of pride in having done the work myself. It's definitely unique for a scooter, although ironically the same color as our car. And since I live in the land of bass boats now, the metal flake fits right in.

QA, other than the fact that I get tired just thinking about the amount of prep work that will entail, so long as you have some clear, calm days, there's no reason you can't tackle that paint job. It'll probably take you two days to sand, then you'll spend a day alternately painting and waiting. The fact that it's all vertical slabs that you're not trying to hold while you paint will also help.

- Clean the hell out of it,
- Compound it to get off the oxidation
- sand it with 80 grit to scuff up the surface,
- clean the hell out of it some more
-- first, use water with a couple drops of dish soap, followed by
-- paint prep cleaner/degreaser,
-- followed by 70% isopropyl alcohol.
-- Use lint-free paper towels and be ready to go through a LOT of them because as soon as it shows dirt, you want to start a new one),
- wipe it all down with tack cloths
- shoot a couple coats of primer,
- WAIT until it's hard enough to sand, then wait a little more
- block sand that down with 400 grit to prep the surface and remove waves,
- clean the hell out of it again, same as above,
- wipe it down with tack cloths
- lay down two or three coats of paint.

Get a compressor that does at least 5.7cfm so you're not waiting on the tank to recharge. Wear ear plugs any time you're using power tools or the compressor is hammer, not just for your ears, but because loud noises are tiring in and of themselves. You might want to break it up into sections, which will obviously prolong the number of days required, but reduce the risk of exhaustion causing mistakes.

Mostly, it's about maintaining that level of diligence through the whole process.

Just like SoCal and JVB inspired me to finally take the plunge and attempt my own paint and body work, if I can pass that inspiration along, then this thread is already a winner and it still has a lot of pages to go. And I've barely even thought about getting back to my P200 motor build for this bike...

edit: Added the tack cloths, which I forgot to mention the first time and broke up the Wall Of Text into more of a task list


Like a bass boat, but for the Doc Marten's crowd



Last edited by chandlerman on Tue Mar 30, 2021 4:38 am; edited 1 time in total
Ossessionato
62 VBB1T Round Tail W/ leaner sidecar
Joined: 26 Jan 2019
Posts: 2241
Location: california
Mon Mar 29, 2021 8:44 pm quote
Wow!
This is going to be your best looking scooter by orders of magnitude.

Now - I am not knocking your other lovely scooters - but you were a commuting man in Chicago... WINTERS... so practical had to outweigh beauty.

Welcome to the south!
Very nice looking indeed.
Y'all come back now - ya hear?
Addicted
Too Many piles of Junk that need too much work and too much money
Joined: 06 May 2019
Posts: 628
Location: Roseburg, Oregon
Mon Mar 29, 2021 11:11 pm quote
Straight Up Shiny Glittery Silver! I love it. And thanks for sharing all you've learned. Some really good hands on the ground tips!
Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Tue Mar 30, 2021 7:06 am quote
charlieman22 wrote:
Wow!
This is going to be your best looking scooter by orders of magnitude.

Now - I am not knocking your other lovely scooters - but you were a commuting man in Chicago... WINTERS... so practical had to outweigh beauty.

Welcome to the south!
Very nice looking indeed.
Y'all come back now - ya hear?
Well, given that most of my scooters have lived VERY hard lives--the Stella and VBB were both ridden year-round and street-parked in Chicago for years at a stretch, with all the bumps and dents to prove it. Once I get through this project, I might go after the VBB as my next project because a rockin' 8" resto-mod would also be cool as hell, too.

The Stella was the "winter bike," with Heidenau snow tires, lots of lighting, and enough body damage that I didn't feel bad when I laid it down on ice or general Bad Things happened to it.

I don't know why, but I'm very pleasantly surprised by how well this is turning out. I have consistently underestimated how long each step is going to take, but now that I've internalized that fact, it's making a big difference in how I feel about things.

Next up after finishing the undersides is getting back onto the front fork rebuild. I *should* have all the parts, other than the front shock I want to use, which is the (sadly, back-ordered) BGM Sport I have on my Sprint.

I just need to get the fork, hub, etc. stripped and painted. That'll be a much simpler process since there's a LOT less of it and I'm doing a single-stage (but still Urethane) black satin using one-shot rattle cans, so making sure everything that's going to get shot is ready to shoot will be key.

Once that's finished, I'll finally be ready to start putting it all back together.

And, sadly, Mike, even after you reminded me, I forgot to check the floor rails fit before painting. I'll just have to tape things up and hope they don't need too much shaping.
bodgemaster
63 GL, 76 Super (x 2), 74 Primavera (x 2), 06 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 5830
Location: So Cal
Tue Mar 30, 2021 9:46 am quote
Quote:
And, sadly, Mike, even after you reminded me, I forgot to check the floor rails fit before painting. I'll just have to tape things up and hope they don't need too much shaping.
I knew it. Bet you forgot to drill holes for the cowl & fender trim too.
Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Tue Mar 30, 2021 9:48 am quote
SoCalGuy wrote:
Quote:
And, sadly, Mike, even after you reminded me, I forgot to check the floor rails fit before painting. I'll just have to tape things up and hope they don't need too much shaping.
I knew it. Bet you forgot to drill holes for the cowl & fender trim too.
I'm going to go no trim, so I didn't drill cowl and fender trim holes on purpose. Sometimes, the best decision is when you decide not to do something
bodgemaster
63 GL, 76 Super (x 2), 74 Primavera (x 2), 06 Fly 150
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 5830
Location: So Cal
Tue Mar 30, 2021 10:41 am quote
Wise choice
Moderator
VNB VSC VBC VSX
Joined: 28 May 2008
Posts: 4854
Location: Hustletown, TX
Tue Mar 30, 2021 11:07 am quote
Nice work.
It really is gonna look ace!
Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Sat Apr 10, 2021 3:14 pm quote
I shot the last of the clearcoat today. I'm declaring victory on the frame and panels.

Tomorrow I'll get back on painting the fork, then I'm waiting for parts to show up from Germany.

Now I need to get serious about the motor, but so many of the parts I need for the P200 are backordered... I'm looking at having a beautiful but with no lump to put in it


Sparkly!

Ossessionato
76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Sat Apr 10, 2021 3:18 pm quote
Also, I'm struggling on what to do about all the solid rivets on the floor rails and legshield badge. SIP are backordered on their rivet tool, and I could buy a rivet gun from Eastwood, but that seems like a lot of dosh for a tool I'll hardly ever use.
Hooked
2001 LML 150 2t
Joined: 16 Jul 2017
Posts: 372
Location: Queensland, Aus
Sat Apr 10, 2021 4:09 pm quote
chandlerman wrote:
Also, I'm struggling on what to do about all the solid rivets on the floor rails and legshield badge. SIP are backordered on their rivet tool, and I could buy a rivet gun from Eastwood, but that seems like a lot of dosh for a tool I'll hardly ever use.
How about heading to an aircraft maintenance facility, ie local airport and asking a mechanic if theyíll drive the rivets in for you? Offer a six pack and theyíll be all over you lol. Seriously tho... aircraft mechanics cut their teeth on driving rivets.
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1959 Allstate w P125x Engine
Joined: 29 Nov 2020
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Location: Los Angeles
Sun Apr 11, 2021 11:33 am quote
chandlerman wrote:
Also, I'm struggling on what to do about all the solid rivets on the floor rails and legshield badge. SIP are backordered on their rivet tool, and I could buy a rivet gun from Eastwood, but that seems like a lot of dosh for a tool I'll hardly ever use.
How's your Italian?
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76 Sprint V, 63 GL, 62 VBB, 05 Stella
Joined: 16 Jun 2011
Posts: 3201
Location: Nashville
Sun Apr 11, 2021 1:19 pm quote
More importantly, how good is youtube's auto-subtitler for Italian!

I'll have to watch it later, as today was picking up the shop, honey-do list stuff, and getting back to the front fork.

One more picture from before I wrapped up the body panels for safe keeping.



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