Mon Mar 08, 2021 8:13 pm

Molto Verboso
2006 LX150 (carbed) | 2007 GT200
Joined: 29 Jun 2016
Posts: 1373
Location: Toronto
 
Molto Verboso
2006 LX150 (carbed) | 2007 GT200
Joined: 29 Jun 2016
Posts: 1373
Location: Toronto
Mon Mar 08, 2021 8:13 pm linkquote
Hey Amareriat - was the recommendation to change rear tire somehow related to the belt failure, or was the tire just due?

And I'm a little confused on your "negligence" here? Dealer servicing on recommended schedules, and 7500 miles on the belt seems like good maintenance (even with highway miles). Maybe you just had some bad luck here?
Mon Mar 08, 2021 9:10 pm

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Mon Mar 08, 2021 9:10 pm linkquote
berto wrote:
Hey Amareriat - was the recommendation to change rear tire somehow related to the belt failure, or was the tire just due?

And I'm a little confused on your "negligence" here? Dealer servicing on recommended schedules, and 7500 miles on the belt seems like good maintenance (even with highway miles). Maybe you just had some bad luck here?
I think so: I pay fair attention to service intervals, but I'm also aware that I probably lean somewhat harder on my ride than most Vespisti: bike is a bit over five years old now, and closing in on 20k miles, probably half of that put on in the past two years. Add in my riding near-year-round, in temperatures as low as 30°F, a handful of thunderstorms, 20-30 mile runs at 60-70mph…stuff like that there. Thing is, the Vespa's engine can take all this abuse in relative stride, provided attention is paid to the usual vitals (fluids, filters), but the rest of the powertrain needs to be looked after a bit more, the belt in particular. Tires are just a matter of physics: noticeably smaller than your average motorcycle's hoops, thus spinning a lot faster, hence a somewhat shorter lifespan, but lots easier to maneuver in urban environments, including parking…not a small deal in places like Gotham.

Want to know the craziest thing? When Le Wife convinced me (before we tied the knot, I might add) to make the jump across the Hudson to our now-beloved hamlet, and I decided I needed my own motorized wheels (but not a car), I planned on getting something like a late-model Suzuki SV650. She got spooked by that idea and suggested something more "mild-mannered", like a scooter, to which I replied "fine, but it has to be highway-legal." (Not much different from an absolute safety standpoint, but whatever.) She said "fine", and here I am with Melody. And, you know what? I wouldn't give this bike up for an MV Agusta. Fact.
Tue Mar 09, 2021 12:40 am

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
Tue Mar 09, 2021 12:40 am linkquote
amateriat wrote:
And, you know what? I wouldn't give this bike up for an MV Agusta. Fact.
AHA!





Tue Mar 09, 2021 1:17 am

Member
GTS 300 (2009)
Joined: 26 Mar 2019
Posts: 25
Location: Derby, UK
 
Member
GTS 300 (2009)
Joined: 26 Mar 2019
Posts: 25
Location: Derby, UK
Tue Mar 09, 2021 1:17 am linkquote
So I have a question, do most folks here service/repair their scoots themselves or use their local dealer/garage?

I recently did the full service on my GTS using a Molassi service kit that I got from a local parts dealer. Not only was this the first time I have ever done a full service on anything, I actually really enjoyed doing it. And there is so much help and advice online (i.e. every video by Robot @ Scooter West) it made it easy.

BTW, I can't believe how much difference swapping out all the standard parts (belt, rollers, air filter, oil filter, brake pads) for Molassi ones has made to the overall performance!
Tue Mar 09, 2021 1:39 am

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
Tue Mar 09, 2021 1:39 am linkquote
This is a discourse that applies to all scooters and also to all other vehicles, as far as I know the economy of scale of the manufacturer starts from the use of original parts of good quality but which come from different suppliers.
The QC carried out by the suppliers is random, it's like when you make a photocopy of a photocopy ... you see it but something is missing.
When you buy a Malossi piece (but it could be another quality brand) that is consumable, Malossi does not produce it but always an external manufacturer; the difference lies in the quality and the Quality Control done on it.
In the case of Malossi, the brand is brought into play with a single spare part that "must be excellent". And durable.
Tue Mar 09, 2021 2:47 pm

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Tue Mar 09, 2021 2:47 pm linkquote
Right Now: Bringin' Her Back Home
But not before, well, checking the little hooligan out.


I'm told she's a somewhat different beast now. Details later tonight.

Tue Mar 09, 2021 4:33 pm

Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 456
Location: San Francisco
 
Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 456
Location: San Francisco
Tue Mar 09, 2021 4:33 pm linkquote
OneFootInTheGravy wrote:
So I have a question, do most folks here service/repair their scoots themselves or use their local dealer/garage?
My dealer is an hour away, which makes servicing inconvenient. Thus, I've found a local shop to do the tires, and I've taken up changing my own oil.

I'm tempted to do the other bits (valves, belts, etc.). I like being handy. I also ride this thing at 80+ MPH every night. It's probably worth a few hundred bucks every 6 months to let a professional look it over.
Tue Mar 09, 2021 4:57 pm

Sponsor
Granturismo 218
Joined: 04 Feb 2013
Posts: 6667
Location: NWAOK
 
Sponsor
Granturismo 218
Joined: 04 Feb 2013
Posts: 6667
Location: NWAOK
Tue Mar 09, 2021 4:57 pm linkquote
Miguel wrote:
Just averaging over the MV comments I've read over the years wrt GTS belt breaks, most didn't use an OEM belt or didn't change it at the recommended 9K mile mark. Of course there are statistical outliers, some belts breaking earlier, some still working well past the 9K miles. But in general, those riders changing the belt either before or at the 9K mile mark, haven't experienced a belt break. If you ride your bike pretty sporty, as Jimc said, it seems more likely that you'd break a belt.

I bet Motovista, Greasy and Stromrider have a lot more to say about this if they respond.

Best
Miguel
If you factor in Dr. Pulley sliders and owner doing own work vs. dealer doing work, you get a different picture of belt failures on MV.
At some point over the last few years, Piaggio changed the belt on the GTS/GTV. I think I made a comment on MV about it when we got the first ones. The actual belt has a different part number, but still comes in the 82941R cardboard sleeve. Mitsuboshi still makes it, but it looks and feels different than the belt it replaced. It's glossier, and it's about 30% cheaper. I have gotten isolated reports of premature failure of this belt, but I usually chalk it up to owner doing own work for the first time and/or Dr. Pulley sliders. Malossi belts are made in Japan by Bando. They use real Kevlar, not generic Aramid (Polini also has Bando make their belts, but they specify generic Aramid). They cost more than the OEM belt, but there isn't a "race to the bottom" mentality at Malossi when it comes to sourcing components. Malossi expects their belt to hold up to their Big Bore Kit and everything else they throw at it. Piaggio seems to be looking for the most cost effective way to put a belt in the scooter.
A good way to measure the difference, either perceived or experienced, in the same belt made by the same company at a factory in Japan and a factory in Southeast Asia is to look at the price Honda charges for the Japanese Bando belt for the Honda Forza compared to the price they charge for the same belt made by Bando in Thailand.
Tue Mar 09, 2021 9:42 pm

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Tue Mar 09, 2021 9:42 pm linkquote
Transformed/Transfixed
I'm just beginning to see, now I'm on my way. - The Moody Blues, "An Afternoon (Tuesday?)"

Yes, it was closer to Tuesday evening, but the sentiment remains: Le Wife drove me the three miles to Indian/Vespa/Et Cetera of Monmouth (she had an important Zoom to get to, so I told her to just drop me off and scurry back home), in order for me to retrieve Melody, and grit my teeth for the final tab as I handed the credit card over. (Turned out to be a bit less harsh than expected, but not exactly cheap.) And I can't complain much: when you have pros doing the wrenching instead of you, you pay for it. And, they're truly great people who dig what they do (which sadly couldn't be said for the dealer where I originally bought the bike). They were wheeling it out front just as we drove up. I air-kissed wife, jumped out and walked in, past the wonderfully hirsute Chieftans, Challengers, STR1200s and Scouts and sidled up to the main desk for the business stuff. Then, having finished with that, I took about fifteen minutes to wander around the Vespa section of the shop, which somehow looks even spiffier than when I last browsed around. (Seriously, if you're anywhere near here, roll by to check them out.) Then came the moment to walk back outside, don helmet and gloves, hop on, fire up, and roll off for the first time in about a month. (Just as well: given the snow we got hammered with, half that time would've been close to impossible to ride, anyway.)

Starting up the bike: fired up quick, smooth, but somehow a bit sharper in exhaust note. (Confirmation bias, maybe?) I push off the center-stand, back up a bit, cant the front wheel left and gently throttle over to the curb: certainly feels smoother than I remember, more tractable on low acceleration, which is nice…they told me this would be the case with all the new Malossi stuff (variator, rollers, sliders, belt…the works, in other words). Suspension certainly felt more-taut for the thirty feet I rode.

Then, after traffic clears, I make a left on Corlies Avenue, then hang a right on Rte 35: Well, wow…throttle response is seriously responsive, nothing herky-jerky in the least, and a quick twist brings a lovely punch of forward motion. And that subtly-sharper exhaust note remains, not at all obnoxious (the way I prefer it), but certainly there.

And then there's the ride: all I can say is that what was already a flickable bike just got even more so, and not by a small degree: tighter, firmer in one sense, more-supple in another. These Malossi RS24 shocks have the softer (white) progressive springs which are more street/road oriented: the shocks are technically marketed as racing equipment, but Malossi knows some 75% of these things end up on licensed road iron; if you're seriously going to race with these, you go for the stiffer (red) springs. These shocks take rough pavement in relative stride, with virtually no bottoming; my stock shocks were bottoming on a disturbingly regular basis, which for all I know might have exacerbated my old drive belt's sudden failure. It's crazy-early to make a call on these, but for the moment, I like these springers a lot. (EDIT: I've been informed by our man at Scooter Parts Co. that the white springs are standard: there is no "stiffer" spring option offered.)

In all: Mel feels tighter, quicker, leaner and more-focused. Tomorrow I take her for a six-mile park-&-ride session at the Long Branch NJ Transit station for a gig (client lives a stone's-throw from Penn Station in Gotham, so riding all the way in this time seems silly), but on Friday I ride from home into Brooklyn for a pair of gigs, and that'll be the proverbial acid test. To quote another old rock song, I just can't wait.


Thar She Be: Worth the wait, I think.


Inside: One very old Guzzi snuck-in.


Malossi manuals/stickers/etc. Take a close look at the suspension booklet on the left: Malossi certainly has, let's say, a cheeky Italian sense of humor.



Last edited by amateriat on Fri Apr 02, 2021 4:54 pm; edited 2 times in total
Tue Mar 09, 2021 11:13 pm

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
Tue Mar 09, 2021 11:13 pm linkquote
Wow ... How did that Guzzi Zigolo 110 end up there?
Wed Mar 10, 2021 12:41 am

Member
GTS 300 (2009)
Joined: 26 Mar 2019
Posts: 25
Location: Derby, UK
 
Member
GTS 300 (2009)
Joined: 26 Mar 2019
Posts: 25
Location: Derby, UK
Wed Mar 10, 2021 12:41 am linkquote
That front shock looks nice! You've got me thinking now.

Did you have new shocks on the back too?
Wed Mar 10, 2021 10:51 am

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Wed Mar 10, 2021 10:51 am linkquote
Attila wrote:
Wow ... How did that Guzzi Zigolo 110 end up there?
It's a thing the dealer manages to do: Being an Indian dealer, they have a vintage (1920s) Scout; for Vespa, a late-50s model (not sure which specific model); and, now that they're "deep in the Guzzi", they snagged this one, which I'm betting Piaggio themselves helped hunt down. (Thanks for ID'ing this one.)
OneFootInTheGravy wrote:
That front shock looks nice! You've got me thinking now.

Did you have new shocks on the back too?
Yep, front and rear.

On the train from Long Branch as I write this. Honestly, I knew the stock dampers on Melody had deteriorated a good deal, but the difference I'm feeling now is almost shocking. Good stretches of road feel really good, and the lousier ones feel a fair deal more tolerable. As mentioned before, the ride quality is firmer, but also more supple and much more controlled overall. Together with the upgraded powertrain bits, the bike really does feel better-than-new. I laughed when one of the techs at Monmouth said "careful, now…you've got a little hot rod now." I'd say he was only half-joking.


Another from yesterday: The miles can't come soon enough.

Wed Mar 10, 2021 12:54 pm

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
Wed Mar 10, 2021 12:54 pm linkquote
amateriat wrote:
(Thanks for ID'ing this one.)

If you need to, I have a huge database of motorcycles and scooters produced from the early twentieth century to today.
Wed Mar 10, 2021 1:07 pm

Member
GTS 300 (2009)
Joined: 26 Mar 2019
Posts: 25
Location: Derby, UK
 
Member
GTS 300 (2009)
Joined: 26 Mar 2019
Posts: 25
Location: Derby, UK
Wed Mar 10, 2021 1:07 pm linkquote
amateriat wrote:
Together with the upgraded powertrain bits, the bike really does feel better-than-new. I laughed when one of the techs at Monmouth said "careful, now…you've got a little hot rod now." I'd say he was only half-joking.
Yeah I swapped out all the power train bits for molasse performance parts on the last service and was pleasantly surprised. Do you know if they went for the same weight rollers¿ I think the ones I went with were slightly lighter than the original ones.[/quote]
Wed Mar 10, 2021 1:36 pm

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Wed Mar 10, 2021 1:36 pm linkquote
OneFootInTheGravy wrote:
amateriat wrote:
Together with the upgraded powertrain bits, the bike really does feel better-than-new. I laughed when one of the techs at Monmouth said "careful, now…you've got a little hot rod now." I'd say he was only half-joking.
Yeah I swapped out all the power train bits for molasse performance parts on the last service and was pleasantly surprised. Do you know if they went for the same weight rollers¿ I think the ones I went with were slightly lighter than the original ones.
[/quote]

Not sure about the roller weights: I'll check the paperwork on it when I get home.
Wed Mar 10, 2021 2:27 pm

Addicted
2018 Vespa 300 GTS Touring
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 902
Location: NYC
 
Addicted
2018 Vespa 300 GTS Touring
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 902
Location: NYC
Wed Mar 10, 2021 2:27 pm linkquote
Congrats for getting your Melody back & she is spiffy. I had installed the Malossi shocks on my previous Vespa & it made was a big change from the OEM shocks. I had also put in Clauss bushings and that added to the firmer ride and made it feel like I was in control on NYC roads.
You are going to enjoy Melody a lot more as the ride will feel better with these new shocks.
Thu Mar 11, 2021 11:50 am

Molto Verboso
Dongfang 170cc, CF Moto Fashion 250
Joined: 07 Dec 2008
Posts: 1147
Location: Hyde Park, New York
 
Molto Verboso
Dongfang 170cc, CF Moto Fashion 250
Joined: 07 Dec 2008
Posts: 1147
Location: Hyde Park, New York
Thu Mar 11, 2021 11:50 am linkquote
As an extended road test these Melody tales are quite interesting. It is indicative of the strengths and weaknesses of a scooter as a commuter vehicle. Future reports will reveal if the aftermarket parts installed decrease wear issues.
Thu Mar 11, 2021 12:14 pm

Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 456
Location: San Francisco
 
Hooked
2020 GTS 300 HPE
Joined: 27 Sep 2019
Posts: 456
Location: San Francisco
Thu Mar 11, 2021 12:14 pm linkquote
I enjoy reading these little blog posts. Thanks for sharing!
Thu Mar 11, 2021 3:59 pm

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
Thu Mar 11, 2021 3:59 pm linkquote
One of the advantages of having a very popular scooter is the availability of alternative parts that are better than those originally assembled; this is one of the things I envy you.
Thu Mar 11, 2021 6:10 pm

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Thu Mar 11, 2021 6:10 pm linkquote
kz1000ST wrote:
As an extended road test these Melody tales are quite interesting. It is indicative of the strengths and weaknesses of a scooter as a commuter vehicle. Future reports will reveal if the aftermarket parts installed decrease wear issues.
When I decided on getting this bike (the process admittedly didn't take very long), I was mostly aware of the pros and cons given my long-range plans for it. Clearly, there were maybe one or two bikes that might have been a bit better-suited in one way or another, but they did absolutely zero for me between the ears - or beyond, which is likely more to the point - and they had a few drawbacks (bigger, heavier). Warts and all, I can't say I regret my choice.
kz1000ST wrote:
As an extended road test these Melody tales are quite interesting. It is indicative of the strengths and weaknesses of a scooter as a commuter vehicle. Future reports will reveal if the aftermarket parts installed decrease wear issues.
I suppose I'm "taking one for the team" here, albeit inadvertently: I felt that if I'm dealing with one or more "consumable" components, and since it costs the same to pay someone to replace components regardless of their relative cost or quality, I might as well try the presumably-better stuff…and, so far, I think I made the right choice. Obviously, I'll let everybody here in on the way things progress - or not, as the case may be.
Attila wrote:
One of the advantages of having a very popular scooter is the availability of alternative parts that are better than those originally assembled; this is one of the things I envy you.
True: This was an underlying factor in my choice of ride: there's an almost-ridiculously large aftermarket for just the GTS, although I think I'm done with upgrades for the moment: the engine's peppy enough, and I have the feeling I'll be tapping more of its capabilities than before as a result of what's already been done.

Tomorrow I take my first trip into Gotham since the old belt blew up on me: a good speed-test along the Garden State Parkway (and the NJ Turnpike if Los Googles suggests it for saving time), Rte 440, and 278, after which things slow up after crossing the Verrazano into Brooklyn, where the new shocks should get an interesting workout. Wish me luck.

Last edited by amateriat on Mon Mar 22, 2021 2:22 pm; edited 2 times in total
Thu Mar 11, 2021 11:46 pm

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
Thu Mar 11, 2021 11:46 pm linkquote
Good luck.
Fri Mar 12, 2021 10:48 am

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Fri Mar 12, 2021 10:48 am linkquote
The Trip In: Brooklyn Roads
In Gotham now.

The ride up was quite fun: engine spooled up smooth and quick off the line, and overall throttle response is more linear than before. (I've long worried that improved performance and smoother response were mutually exclusive unless one bought a new bike.) Road handling at speed is great: I feel more confident negotiating turns, and high-speed lane changes feel more sure-footed and precise.

All the above is in regard to highway riding, but things get more interesting on the "iffy" streets of Brooklyn. Whereas I was a bit concerned over how the firmer ride quality of the new Malossi setup would translate rolling over the fractured-and-occasionally-missing chipseal and other assorted irregularities, I was again pleasantly surprised: the bike takes the hits quite gracefully, and never bottoming even once. Wildest revelation here was riding along Ocean Avenue with someone on a red Sprint, wearing a bicycle helmet and running at least one red light along the way. Going at about 25mph, I hit a rather deep dip in the road, and suddenly, I found myself "getting air" - albeit maybe a bit over an inch. Melody landed calmly and solidly, without a hard jolt or "pogoing."

I'll have a return-trip report tonight, but so far, so (very) good.

P.S. Looks like the new tire in back is in fact a CityGrip 2. Can I handle all this newness at once? 😆


No sleep till I'm outta Brooklyn.

Fri Mar 12, 2021 11:04 am

Molto Verboso
Dongfang 170cc, CF Moto Fashion 250
Joined: 07 Dec 2008
Posts: 1147
Location: Hyde Park, New York
 
Molto Verboso
Dongfang 170cc, CF Moto Fashion 250
Joined: 07 Dec 2008
Posts: 1147
Location: Hyde Park, New York
Fri Mar 12, 2021 11:04 am linkquote
I suppose I'm "taking one for the team" here, albeit inadvertently

For me I'm interested in comparing your experience with the 300 against the 250 of Steve Williams. Since both of you used your scooters for commuting purposes and both obtain service from a dealer it will reveal how far Vespa has come in the ten years between your scooters.
Sun Mar 14, 2021 8:45 am

Addicted
GTS 300ie Touring 2013 - Signora D'argento
Joined: 03 Jun 2018
Posts: 889
Location: Lancaster, U.K.
 
Addicted
GTS 300ie Touring 2013 - Signora D'argento
Joined: 03 Jun 2018
Posts: 889
Location: Lancaster, U.K.
Sun Mar 14, 2021 8:45 am linkquote
It sounds like the mechanics at Monmouth have done you proud Amateriat. It's got to be money well spent if the handling of your scooter is more assured and altogether it's a more positive ride. You must feel like you are riding a new bike, but for a fraction of the cost.
Sun Mar 14, 2021 10:34 am

Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2038
Location: Central Pennsylvania
 
Ossessionato
2006 Vespa GTS250ie, 1992 BMW K75
Joined: 07 Nov 2005
Posts: 2038
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Sun Mar 14, 2021 10:34 am linkquote
Reading this thread reminds me of all the maintenance I have to do on the scooter. And the motorcycle. Or if I just drop it at the dealer.

I've had a similar experience picking up the GTS after a belt and roller change. Crisp and quick. Same with new tires. Makes whatever I spent seem worth the price.

Oh, and I'm glad you survived the belt failure. And that you didn't really soil yourself!
Sun Mar 14, 2021 2:44 pm

Addicted
2018 Vespa 300 GTS Touring
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 902
Location: NYC
 
Addicted
2018 Vespa 300 GTS Touring
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 902
Location: NYC
Sun Mar 14, 2021 2:44 pm linkquote
Friday was a beautiful day to ride & seems like you are enjoying the upgrades.
You are going to be pleasantly surprised how it shall handle in high winds like today. The firmer shocks give you confidence in the grip on the road.
Stay safe mate. The weather should get better in 10 days for fun trips on the new setup.
Sun Mar 14, 2021 5:55 pm

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Sun Mar 14, 2021 5:55 pm linkquote
Later That Evening: The Ride Home
Well, there were two unfortunate events upon starting my ride from Brooklyn, neither of which had anything to do with the bike: the first was a trip to a nearby Mobil station to gas up for the return leg, where the one pump immediately available rejected my bank and credit cards, and the station attendant was too overwhelmed to take my four bucks cash so I could pump enough gas to get home; had to hunt for a Shell station (where I never have a problem, presumably because I'm enrolled in their "plan" which saves me a whopping five cents/gallon each time I fill up…maybe if I drove an F-150 King Ranch or something, that would matter more). But during my search, I was approaching a side street to make a turn and saw lights in my mirror that looked like I was about to get hit, and hit the throttle and cross the street instead…and into the bright flash of a red-light camera. (We'll see what happens with that in a few weeks, I guess. So much for my blemish-free record.)

Once I was gassed-up and rolling, things got much better. I eventually needed to hit the BQE to the Verrazano Bridge, but getting on from someplace like Prospect Avenue past dusk can seem a bit like a scene from Ronin, so I'll suffer riding underneath and to the side along Third Avenue, which looked like it was being repaved a year or two back, but appears to have returned to its Barstow-to-Vegas bump-and-grind status. And this, folks, was where Melody truly showed off her now-fancier footwork: the night the bike's belt went "poof", I was working rather hard to dodge the bigger ruts and craters for the trip from 36th Street to the onramp to 278 around 60th Street. This time out, while I didn't exactly aim straight toward said ruts-n-craters, I didn't cower from much of the rougher stuff, and the result was pretty much as I'd hoped: minimum boing-boing, better directional stability, and, again, no bottoming (near as I could tell…traffic was moving at or not far below 40mph).

Once I hit 278, I ratched up speed and made my way to the outer lane to take me onto the lower level of the Verrazano. The decision of taking the upper or lower level is Hobson's Choice in a way: the upper level plants you right onto the Staten Island Expressway, but not before it makes you take a radical S-turn almost immediately after coming off the span: this is temporary, since they're still working on lane-realignment, but because of the temporary nature, the lane-striping can get confusing, and that makes things really interesting if you're in the center lane and flanked by vehicles to either side of you, all going some 20mph over the posted limit because Of Course. The lower level of the bridge avoids this crazy switchback, but forces you to fight your way back onto 278/SIE, since the main exit dumps you onto local exits on Staten Island.

From there, it's some three-to-four miles (near the scene of The Incident) until I peel off for Rte 440, and another five miles or so before peeling off there and cross the Outerbridge, then a quick run before turning onto the Garden State Parkway, immediately hitting the dreaded Driscoll Bridge, where I usually scurry from the outer lane to the inner, or one lane from it, but do know the Driscoll is some six lanes wide in each direction, which can feel like dropping yourself in VR video driving game. This time, though, I managed to charge into the fray with a bit more calm than usual, one eye on my left mirror, the other straight ahead. Melody had a somewhat better time maintaining speed on the incline, getting passed by fewer cars than usual. Then, on the descent…65, 70, 75…Google Maps' GPS registered an official 80-81mph, which on Mel's speedo registered a bit below 85…and the limiter never kicked in. Now I was doing the passing for the most part, but decided to behave myself after about two miles. Keeping things at about 70, the bike felt even smoother now than earlier. Ride was still pretty comfy: It'll be interesting to see if, when, and how I might want to tweak the shocks after a while, especially now that I can adjust preload and damping at both ends.

Again, it's still early days for all these changes, but I absolutely love the sum total of these upgrades in terms of the bike's overall behavior. Melody hasn't exactly become a wolf-cub in sheep's garb, but I like to think she's a baby Q-ship at this point.

Last edited by amateriat on Mon Mar 22, 2021 2:34 pm; edited 6 times in total
Sun Mar 14, 2021 8:21 pm

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Sun Mar 14, 2021 8:21 pm linkquote
Motovista wrote:
Miguel wrote:
Just averaging over the MV comments I've read over the years wrt GTS belt breaks, most didn't use an OEM belt or didn't change it at the recommended 9K mile mark. Of course there are statistical outliers, some belts breaking earlier, some still working well past the 9K miles. But in general, those riders changing the belt either before or at the 9K mile mark, haven't experienced a belt break. If you ride your bike pretty sporty, as Jimc said, it seems more likely that you'd break a belt.

I bet Motovista, Greasy and Stromrider have a lot more to say about this if they respond.

Best
Miguel
If you factor in Dr. Pulley sliders and owner doing own work vs. dealer doing work, you get a different picture of belt failures on MV.
At some point over the last few years, Piaggio changed the belt on the GTS/GTV. I think I made a comment on MV about it when we got the first ones. The actual belt has a different part number, but still comes in the 82941R cardboard sleeve. Mitsuboshi still makes it, but it looks and feels different than the belt it replaced. It's glossier, and it's about 30% cheaper. I have gotten isolated reports of premature failure of this belt, but I usually chalk it up to owner doing own work for the first time and/or Dr. Pulley sliders. Malossi belts are made in Japan by Bando. They use real Kevlar, not generic Aramid (Polini also has Bando make their belts, but they specify generic Aramid). They cost more than the OEM belt, but there isn't a "race to the bottom" mentality at Malossi when it comes to sourcing components. Malossi expects their belt to hold up to their Big Bore Kit and everything else they throw at it. Piaggio seems to be looking for the most cost effective way to put a belt in the scooter.
A good way to measure the difference, either perceived or experienced, in the same belt made by the same company at a factory in Japan and a factory in Southeast Asia is to look at the price Honda charges for the Japanese Bando belt for the Honda Forza compared to the price they charge for the same belt made by Bando in Thailand.
Very interesting. I'm wondering if this has anything to do with Piaggio prescribing mandatory belt-changes every 6k miles (as opposed to the previous 9k) for the HPE-series GTS/GTV models? (In other words: it's not just about the tad extra "oomph" the new engine produces?)
VESPAsfw3 wrote:
Reading this thread reminds me of all the maintenance I have to do on the scooter. And the motorcycle. Or if I just drop it at the dealer.

I've had a similar experience picking up the GTS after a belt and roller change. Crisp and quick. Same with new tires. Makes whatever I spent seem worth the price.

Oh, and I'm glad you survived the belt failure. And that you didn't really soil yourself!
Merci, Steve. While I don't think I was being terribly cavalier in terms of maintenance, I believe I failed to take into account how much farther, and harder, I was riding the bike these past two years versus the previous near-three years: highways, in and around big, bad NYC (and one trip to Philly!). Obviously, I'll be keeping a much-keener eye on mileage and maintenance. Nonetheless, it was likely the nudge I needed to make some serious (albeit pricey) changes to make Melody more-amenable to the way I really ride these days.
baba12 wrote:
Friday was a beautiful day to ride & seems like you are enjoying the upgrades.
You are going to be pleasantly surprised how it shall handle in high winds like today. The firmer shocks give you confidence in the grip on the road.
Stay safe mate. The weather should get better in 10 days for fun trips on the new setup.
It was a lovely day (though perhaps a tad chilly on the return ride home…should've packed a sweater), and, those two other incidents aside, couldn't have been a nicer ride back. Once things get back to a vague sense of "normal", we need to meet up again.
Sun Mar 14, 2021 11:04 pm

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
Sun Mar 14, 2021 11:04 pm linkquote
Thank you for letting me fall into your American driving atmosphere, I imagined driving with my three-wheeler behind you and Melody along the city and peripheral landscapes imagining myself to be a new Sal Paradise.
Mon Mar 22, 2021 11:39 am

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Mon Mar 22, 2021 11:39 am linkquote
Melody: Pandemic Point Guard
The Story, So Far:

- A little under two weeks ago, Le Wife's younger son, who's been with us since moving from Richmond, VA, came down with a fever. Fearing the worst, he immediately scheduled for a test: sure enough, he got nailed by COVID (for the second time, no less…first time was while he was still in Richmond). Me and wife quickly scheduled our own tests a few days later: somehow, I dodged the COVID bullet, while she didn't. Damn.

- This, of course, has brought my freelance work to a smoking halt: it was a good thing I got some work under my belt the week before, but this illustrates how precarious things have gotten, and that you can't be too careful. Had to scramble to reschedule as best I could. (I thought I was "free to go" this coming Saturday; just found out I'm stuck close to home until the end of the month. [Multiple polysyllabic obscenities muttered at laptop.]

- But I have my health, the sympathies of both wife and her kid (they get to leave the household sooner), and Tapper, the Wonder Cat. And, of course, Melody, which is now running better than ever, which comes in handy, since while I can't really go anyplace far-flung (COVID-free or not), I can do curbside pickup for supermarket runs for the household.

To that end: The new shocks have gotten yet more testing on the three-mile round-trip to our local Wegmans and back, including all sorts of new and interesting excavations along the way. This included a lousy repaving job that I hit one-third of the way coming back that almost feels like a baby ski-jump. It's been there just long enough to have experienced it with Mel's original shocks, so it's no exaggeration to say the new setup handles the situation considerably better. In addition, low-speed throttle response is markedly improved. You can bet your ass that I'll be taking a sailor-on-shore-leave ride first chance I get.

And, to everyone bothering to follow this silly saga: peace out, and Stay Negative.


Curbside at Wegmans: I think nearly everyone here knows me by my Vespa, which is sort of cool in itself.

Mon Mar 22, 2021 12:20 pm

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
Mon Mar 22, 2021 12:20 pm linkquote
👍
Mon Mar 22, 2021 12:41 pm

Member
Sei Giorni
Joined: 20 Mar 2021
Posts: 19
Location: Jersey Shore
 
Member
Sei Giorni
Joined: 20 Mar 2021
Posts: 19
Location: Jersey Shore
Mon Mar 22, 2021 12:41 pm linkquote
Re: Melody: Pandemic Point Guard
amateriat wrote:
The Story, So Far:

- A little under two weeks ago, Le Wife's younger son, who's been with us since moving from Richmond, VA, came down with a fever. Fearing the worst, he immediately scheduled for a test: sure enough, he got nailed by COVID (for the second time, no less…first time was while he was still in Richmond). Me and wife quickly scheduled our own tests a few days later: somehow, I dodged the COVID bullet, while she didn't. Damn.

- This, of course, has brought my freelance work to a smoking halt: it was a good thing I got some work under my belt the week before, but this illustrates how precarious things have gotten, and that you can't be too careful. Had to scramble to reschedule as best I could. (I thought I was "free to go" this coming Saturday; just found out I'm stuck close to home until the end of the month. [Multiple polysyllabic obscenities muttered at laptop.]

- But I have my health, the sympathies of both wife and her kid (they get to leave the household sooner), and Tapper, the Wonder Cat. And, of course, Melody, which is now running better than ever, which comes in handy, since while I can't really go anyplace far-flung (COVID-free or not), I can do curbside pickup for supermarket runs for the household.

To that end: The new shocks have gotten yet more testing on the three-mile round-trip to our local Wegmans and back, including all sorts of new and interesting excavations along the way. This included a lousy repaving job that I hit one-third of the way coming back that almost feels like a baby ski-jump. It's been there just long enough to have experienced it with Mel's original shocks, so it's no exaggeration to say the new setup handles the situation considerably better. In addition, low-speed throttle response is markedly improved. You can bet your ass that I'll be taking a sailor-on-shore-leave ride first chance I get.

And, to everyone bothering to follow this silly saga: peace out, and Stay Negative.
Enjoying following this thread. Thanks for keeping it going. Man, I tip my hat to you, riding into the city like you do. I feel like its an adventure if I ride from Atlantic Highlands to Eatontown and back! (Mind you, I've only put 300 miles on the Vesp and that's my life's experience full stop)! My next adventure will be taking it down to Indian in a couple of weeks for its 600 mile service. I'm taking my time to build up my confidence you could say!

Thanks again for this blog!
Thu Apr 01, 2021 12:15 am

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Thu Apr 01, 2021 12:15 am linkquote
Next, We Took Manhattan (again)
Well, I'll just say a lot has happened in the last several weeks: a wounded Melody gets back on her wheels, but Le Wife's younger son, who's been staying with us since moving from Richmond, VA last August, came down with a fever a few weeks ago, prompting him to get tested for COVID, and - surprise - he tested positive. This prompted wife and me to get tested in turn: she tested positive, while I (somehow, but I have my theories) tested negative. Under normal conditions, I should be shouting from the rooftops "YAY!", but the problem here was that I still had to shelter-in-place just as they had to, but still had to be the go-to person for stuff like curbside pick-up for groceries and the like. Good thing Melody was in good nick for the tasks, and those handful of trips outside were good for the head, to put it mildly.

This week marked the end of my sequestering, and I started off with a bang Tuesday, with a pair of IT gigs, the first in Manhattan, followed by one in Brooklyn. A fast run up the Garden State Parkway, followed by a 14-mile run along the NJ Turnpike, under the Hudson care of the Lincoln Tunnel, then some meandering to Seventh Avenue and West 57th Street, diagonally across the street from a still-silent Carnegie Hall. My client, who lives in a pretty swanky prewar building, had arranged for my parking Melody in a service entrance alley behind the main entrance, although there was a bit of confusion among the building's security staff when I arrived: it took about fifteen minutes before I could wheel the bike from the sidewalk through the gate and down the ramp (narrow, but just wide enough) to a spot just ten yards away from a slightly-forlorn-looking yellow Primavera parked fetchingly against an arched brick wall.

Some three hours later, having completed gig #1, I wheeled Melody back out onto onto the sidewalk on Seventh Avenue, paused only to take a few quick phone-camera snaps, then made my way downtown and (somehow) toward Brooklyn. Manhattan was still something of a post-COVID ghost town: along the Rodeo Drive-like luxury-goods shops of 57th Street (Bulgari, Louis Vuitton , etc.) there was some activity, but not much, while other shops, and restaurants in particular, were shuttered, or might as well should've been. And, while North-South traffic was manageable, East-West traffic positively sucked…which, unfortunately, was pertitnent to my getting the hell out of the borough. I found myself occasionally making the dick-moves I moan about others doing, just to get myself that little bit closer to that bridge or tunnel allowing me to crawl from the island too many out-of-towners irritatingly refer to as "the city" (conveniently ignoring the other four boroughs, but that's a story not quite fit for this forum), and just a little closer to client #2. (Took the Queens midtown tunnel, for the very first time…all I can report about that was "interesting", but not in a particularly good way.)

Got to second client a bit over an hour later, but not before making a quick pit-stop to Vespa Brooklyn and say Hi to the crew and loiter at their showroom for ten minutes or so, then cruise to my gig. Encountered a few fellow scooter/moto folk along the way. Finished up with second gig around 8:30 PM, then made my way to a Shell station I knew and trusted more than some others I'd had bad luck with…only to find that station's pumps wouldn't take credit cards at all, forcing me to go into the shop to have someone at the counter sort out the transaction ("here's four bucks, that's enough to get me home"), fill up, and be on my way. No, nothing is normal now.

And, in the not-terribly-chilly evening, I sped out of Gotham, over the Verazzano, through Staten Island and back into the Garden State, rewarded with the most enchanting, low golden Moon all the way home, with very little traffic to distract or badger me. That's as cool a coda as I could imagine.

Melody Particulars: Los Googles chose to route me me long a few of my lest-favored roads into Gotham this time, meaning 1-9 to the Lincoln Tunnel. The one bit of good news here was that this would further test the new suspension bits Mel's been fitted with, and I'm happy to say things went very, very well on this front: the bike was well-controlled on some seriously-crappy pavement at speeds averaging 45-50mph, and amid some fairly erratic traffic. On my way home, I took notice of two other things: The new variator and belt definitely does a better better power-transfer job, helping power the bike over ascents, like the dreaded Driscoll Bridge at serious speeds, and hang with traffic along the Garden State Parkway with just that extra brio. Meanwhile, the new suspension brought about another observation, which I suppose is a byproduct of its racing-oriented engineering: while low-speed performance is fine (if a tad firmer than the stock dampers), the faster I ride, the more-supple the ride becomes: riding Mel at or near the limit, things feel very refined and controlled…it wasn't like the old springers were awful - at least, before wearing them out - but the new setup felt a good deal more confidence-inspiring.


Semi-Private Parking, I: Took some effort, but at least it was off the street, and free.


Semi-Private Parking, II: Somebody's Primavera in the background, minus plate, and broken rear turn-signals.


Back on the Street: West 57th Street, to be exact. Quite the conversation-starter.


Well, this is how *I* got to Carnegie Hall. (I miss this place terribly.)


Vespa Brooklyn: A fun, ten-minute pit-stop after escaping Planet Manhattan.



Last edited by amateriat on Thu Apr 01, 2021 10:39 am; edited 2 times in total
Thu Apr 01, 2021 1:20 am

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
Thu Apr 01, 2021 1:20 am linkquote
What instrument do you play in your concerts?
I didn't know you are a musician.
Thu Apr 01, 2021 1:28 am

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Thu Apr 01, 2021 1:28 am linkquote
Attila wrote:
What instrument do you play in your concerts?
I didn't know you are a musician.
Sadly, I don't. (Well, blues harmonica, but only barely.) I used to go to concerts at Carnegie on a regular basis, and loved it (with a few notorious episodes there to boot. ) I happened to be nearby to do technical service on a client's computer, the first of two such jobs that day. Ended up putting about 135 miles on the bike.
Thu Apr 01, 2021 1:44 am

Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
In garage: Yamaha Tricity 155 Urban 2019 - MV Agusta 125 RS 1956
Joined: 21 Jul 2007
Posts: 6223
Location: Latina (Italy)
Thu Apr 01, 2021 1:44 am linkquote
amateriat wrote:
Attila wrote:
What instrument do you play in your concerts?
I didn't know you are a musician.
Sadly, I don't. (Well, blues harmonica, but only barely.) I used to go to concerts at Carnegie on a regular basis, and loved it (with a few notorious episodes there to boot. ) I happened to be nearby to do technical service on a client's computer, the first of two such jobs that day. Ended up putting about 135 miles on the bike.
I had started going to music school but with the epidemic the school was closed, I'm waiting for it to reopen.
I also have a harmonica (Honer) and I "fiddle" with it a little ...
Thu Apr 01, 2021 5:14 am

Molto Verboso
2016 Sprint S 150, 2016 Sprint 150, 2006 GTS 250, 2006 GTS 250, 2012 GTS 300, 1974 Vespa 150 Super
Joined: 21 Oct 2016
Posts: 1044
Location: Vermont
 
Molto Verboso
2016 Sprint S 150, 2016 Sprint 150, 2006 GTS 250, 2006 GTS 250, 2012 GTS 300, 1974 Vespa 150 Super
Joined: 21 Oct 2016
Posts: 1044
Location: Vermont
Thu Apr 01, 2021 5:14 am linkquote
Great writeup! Thank you!
Thu Apr 01, 2021 8:37 am

Ossessionato
2010 ThunderFly 190, 2008 250 GTS
Joined: 29 Apr 2011
Posts: 2873
Location: Springboro, OH
 
Ossessionato
2010 ThunderFly 190, 2008 250 GTS
Joined: 29 Apr 2011
Posts: 2873
Location: Springboro, OH
Thu Apr 01, 2021 8:37 am linkquote
I did the swap to Malossi RS24 front and back a few years ago, and noticed a rather dynamic change in handling. There's a huge difference on high speed corners/sweepers. The bike takes a set and you can hold a line very well.

I also upgraded to Poly bushings in the rear from Clauss Studios. Fairly cheap upgrade and provides a bit more firm mounting point. I only did the rear bushes. Body control is improved, but you sacrifice a smidge of comfort.
Thu Apr 01, 2021 11:31 am

Addicted
GTS 250ie Super, Italjet Velocifero, Scarabeo 150, S50, ET4, ET2
Joined: 22 Nov 2016
Posts: 676
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
 
Addicted
GTS 250ie Super, Italjet Velocifero, Scarabeo 150, S50, ET4, ET2
Joined: 22 Nov 2016
Posts: 676
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Thu Apr 01, 2021 11:31 am linkquote
I was once standing on the corner diagonally to Carnegie Hall. I was approached by a gentleman that asked me how you get to Carnegie Hall. I paused and held my smart ass remark and pointed it out to him. I missed the chance to use the punch line of a bad joke. I still regret it. I did laugh inside for 10 minutes.
Fri Apr 02, 2021 11:38 am

Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
 
Ossessionato
2015 GTS 300 Super (Melody)
Joined: 22 Apr 2015
Posts: 2916
Location: Asbury Park, NJ
Fri Apr 02, 2021 11:38 am linkquote
Epilogue: With a Hocus-Pocus, I'm In Focus
Time for me to wrap up this adventure-thread, thanking everyone for the moral support, advice and anecdotes along the way.

I'm keeping it parked at home today, and was on my third cuppa Earl Grey when I checked my e-mail, including my daily USPS alert for incoming mail, and among the usual flotsam-and-jetsam stood out one envelope with an ominously-familiar logo and crest: The City of New York.

Remember farther back in this thread my tale of the traffic snafu where, in the process of seemingly avoiding getting rear-ended, I ran afoul of a red-light camera, and I wondered aloud if "they got me", and if so, how long until I found out? Well, like everything else at the moment, the gears of bureaucracy grind slower than usual, but they do grind, particularly when money's at stake. (I'm generally not one to scoff at Traffic/Parking Violations as a mere revenue-generating apparatus, but check the first line in that envelope's return-address.) Well, no surprise, they got me. But the fine is less than I'd feared, and no points on my license, so I'm not sweating it. It still burns a bit to observe all the nimrods in Gotham running lights with seeming impunity (and frequently sans tags on their rides), while would-be Dudley Do-Rights like me can get snagged making a simple mistake, but it's a case of "'twas ever thus." On the bright side, my work life is heading back to some semblance of normal, and my local club's first group ride of the year is coming up in a few weeks (yay!), and I'm even getting a haircut in a week (double-yay!, since the aging-Billy-Preston/Black-Albert-Einstein look is wearing very thin with me). And I'm looking forward to possibly meeting up with at least a few local MV folk before too long. Life may not quite resemble what it did before All This, but large parts of it can still be good.

As a certain YouTuber like to say, I'll see you out on the road.


Not My Lucky Day: I think Allen Funt would understand.

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