[NSR] How are your houses made?
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Location: The Netherlands
Thu Apr 22, 2021 12:07 pm quote
pmatulew wrote:
Here in the Northeast our Ash trees are dying off. (Invasive beetle species) I took down 6 this last summer. Expecting more to go soon.

"You build it once, you build it right."

Poured concrete basement walls and floor, pretty much sitting directly on the shale bedrock, (with some insulation underneath). Timber frame skeleton. Exterior shell of "Structural Insulated Panels". (Big oreo cookies with a layer of flake board on each side and 4" or 6" of crispy yellow foam in the middle). Same stuff commercial freezers are made of. Energy efficient, airtight, quiet. Chalet/Loft floor plan so just a few wood stud and sheetrock walls. Wood and tile floors. Pex domestic plumbing. Small Propane fired boiler in the basement. Hot water radiant heat tubing under the main floor. Absolutely recommend it to anyone. Biggest regret is that the basement floor was poured before we knew about it. Hemlock 1x12 siding. Steel roof.

My wife and I did everything except the concrete and the timber frame. (Both require skills and tools we don't have). 2 years of my life I won't get back, but it was worth it in the end.

And yes there is absolutely a 3 car garage that the cars can sometimes fit in.
Thatís just beautiful! So nice!
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1966 Vespa 180 Super Sport
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Location: The Netherlands
Thu Apr 22, 2021 12:12 pm quote
Here in The Netherlands, itís a lot of connected living. All hard brick on the outsides/walls and also mostly on the insides. Built in the 1920ís - and renovated over the years. Last renovation we did was a few years ago - completely gutted the place and rebuilt most of it. Combination of 220v electricity and gas.







Hooked
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Thu Apr 22, 2021 2:11 pm quote
So many European homes are so clean, modern, and elegant. Look like they should be on the cover of a magazine.

American homes look very "lived in". Too much clutter.
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Fri Apr 23, 2021 2:50 am quote
pmatulew wrote:
Here in the Northeast our Ash trees are dying off. (Invasive beetle species) I took down 6 this last summer. Expecting more to go soon.

"You build it once, you build it right."

Poured concrete basement walls and floor, pretty much sitting directly on the shale bedrock, (with some insulation underneath). Timber frame skeleton. Exterior shell of "Structural Insulated Panels". (Big oreo cookies with a layer of flake board on each side and 4" or 6" of crispy yellow foam in the middle). Same stuff commercial freezers are made of. Energy efficient, airtight, quiet. Chalet/Loft floor plan so just a few wood stud and sheetrock walls. Wood and tile floors. Pex domestic plumbing. Small Propane fired boiler in the basement. Hot water radiant heat tubing under the main floor. Absolutely recommend it to anyone. Biggest regret is that the basement floor was poured before we knew about it. Hemlock 1x12 siding. Steel roof.

My wife and I did everything except the concrete and the timber frame. (Both require skills and tools we don't have). 2 years of my life I won't get back, but it was worth it in the end.

And yes there is absolutely a 3 car garage that the cars can sometimes fit in.
Superb house and wonderful view!
I am more and more amazed by the intense use that is made of wood to build houses, here in my area only the old rural houses have the supports (beams) of the wooden roof; some leave them visible and others put the suspended ceiling.
A friend has a wonderful exposed wooden beams, when I go I take some pictures.
Molto Verboso
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Thu Apr 29, 2021 8:02 am quote
pmatulew wrote:
So many European homes are so clean, modern, and elegant. Look like they should be on the cover of a magazine.
I also find them to be without any human identity.
Minimalist.
Molto Verboso
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Thu Apr 29, 2021 8:23 am quote
In preparation to moving into my new place, I did some minor changes externally as well as refubishing the bathrooms.
In demolishing a wall between the main house and an outbuilding, I opened up a narrow space which began to really appeal to me.

I have decided to name the space Vicolo della Vespa (Vespa Alley).
It's a work in progress to reflect a scent of Italy to make my Vespas feel at home...
I envisage window boxes with bright lowers and pots of herbs for the kitchen that leads onto the vicolo. There's a severely pruned bougainvillea in the foreground and a baby lemon tree in the sun at the back.

As you can see, our homes are constructed of clay brick with a lot of pine timber used for roofs and pergolas etc.



Hooked
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Thu Apr 29, 2021 8:43 am quote
Minimalist; perhaps.

There is a delicate balance that needs to be struck between too much and too little.





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Thu Apr 29, 2021 9:54 am quote


Ossessionato
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Thu Apr 29, 2021 10:40 am quote
Minimalist vs the Clutter Lived in Look.
Obviously, some folks do not pick up as well as others. Even so, the
latest design trend is all White, Black and Grey modern with the minimalist look.

As an old fart, I prefer the English Tudor look with interiors finished with
dark woods. I find the super modern look to be sterile in eye appeal.
Like most things, the fashion/architecture will swing back and forth.

Attila/Fud - We build with wood because we actually have wood. In Attila's case, all the forests were cut down in Roman times. Also, the availability of materials. Whole hills and mountains in Italy are solid marble.

To build a entire house with polished marble floors would cost a fortune here
in Frost Bite Falls. I was so impressed in Italy with all the amazing stone walls and floors.

When I went back to Italy and visited my old landlord (He is reasonably well to do), I found out he covered all the beautiful marble floors with oak hard wood.

Bob Copeland
Minnesota
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Thu Apr 29, 2021 11:58 am quote
The floors of my house are all in "cotto di Siena":

https://www.maestridelcotto.it/it/blog/cotto-senese-pavimenti-in-cotto-fatto-a-mano-e-cotto-a-legna-a-partire-da-2800-al-mq-2127

Handmade terracotta and wood fired with deep clay only.

The Sienese clays, after being fired, take on a pink color, and this is how the splendid Cotto Rosato Toscano is obtained.

The clays are mixed with the use of water only, for a 100% BIO product.

Once the mixture is obtained, we proceed following the ETRUSCAN METHOD which involves manual beating of each individual item in wooden molds, natural drying and wood firing, which gives the typical shades of color.

The depth clays and the firing are decisive elements in the production, as they ensure that the terracotta is Compact, Resistant and Elastic.
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Thu Apr 29, 2021 3:13 pm quote
Late to this thread, but long a subject Iíve thought about.
Until 2018, when we lived in NYC, home was a twenty foot wide attached row house built in 1931. Flat roof originally asphalt and tar but I applied a rubberized membrane which held up really well. Slate roof facade on the front. Concrete basement slab with side walls made of cement block; front and rear walls were brick. Interior walls and ceilings were wood frame and wood lathe covered with three coats of plaster. Oak flooring throughout. Steam boiler for heat fueled by natural gas with big cast iron radiators. All electric wiring either metal jacketed (BX Cable) or run through steel conduit; this is rare outside of NYC where it is required by code. All plumbing supply lines were copper with cast iron waste lines. Both city water and sewer.
We moved 200 miles north to a fairly rural area where construction practice is quite different. The house we bought was built in 2007. Wood frame construction on a foundation built of concrete block. Exterior siding is Hardyboard, which looks like wood but canít rot. Asphalt shingle roof. Sheetrock walls, hardwood floors, with mostly tongue and groove wood ceilings. The house has two completely separate heating systems; forced hot air (coupled with central A/C) and radiant floor heating supplied by a boiler. Both heating systems fueled by liquid propane, as there is no natural gas available. Not a fan of the radiant floor heating; we only got it working this winter by replacing a bad boiler; I find it is draftier than the hot air system, probably because we have very high ceilings. We went back to using the hot air, except we use the boiler to produce domestic hot water. All plumbing lines are modern, non-metal composites. Water comes from a deep private well and waste is handled by a traditional septic tank and leach field.
When I didnít live in one, I was never a fan of wood frame houses covered with Tyvek and vinyl siding, which is so common in many parts of the US. I always appreciated stone and concrete houses as being more substantial. Now that I live in one, I am more amenable to wood.





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Thu Apr 29, 2021 6:27 pm quote
I am living in another renovation project, this is supposed to be my last but if I win the lottery sons have agreed I can play old house on anything I want. Built in 1900, framing is all oak, black, hard and you predrill for everything, some of the original plaster is still here, some I have repaired. Built for housing for the Ďnewí lumber mill and sold over 20 years later to the young couple living in it... who raised kids and grandchildren here. Their estate sold it to the guy across the street snd 3 houses up, the rent helped put his kids through college, then he sold it to a tenant..and I bought it from them in 2004...@;&#. And I started work, on all that had been neglected, all that had been done cheaply and wrong and I am still working on it...1/2 that old brick foundation has been replaced, I gained a nice utility space and still cuss whoever decided to dig a hole, pour a bit of concrete and block up 2 rows for a small square... seems we are on sand and silt and not much more, so with no gutters and a nice hole for sand to slip into... ya, entire east foundation wall... so the fix was $500 more than I paid for the place. Which gained a metal roof and east dormer and over 600 square foot of gained space I knew was hiding under that steeply pitched roof... from under 840 square foot my Little house has grown and I have a studio and retreat, space of my sewing and books and dolls...
I have added a back concrete patio and a 9x15 shop building for my wood working tools, the scooters, and wiring that is on the list once I update the electrical from weather cap to meter main enclosure and the utility company quits crying and replaces their wiring coming from power pole to my service entrance...at their costs... cuz old woman is adding 160 amp sucking tankless water heater and then solar is going on...Ya, bought this place knowing I had great solar potential... less I spend on utility bills the more I have to spend on fun stuff, like supporting 3 Piaggio critters.... not sure that was in the original plans but itís working for me.
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Fri Apr 30, 2021 1:12 am quote
Kayemtee wrote:
Water comes from a deep private well and waste is handled by a traditional septic tank and leach field.
Regarding the topic of liquid waste disposal, you reminded me that my house also has a system similar to yours even if the public sewer line passes nearby; this was preferred by me for two reasons:
1: cheap because here you pay based on the parameters of the number of inhabitants and the surface of the house (for me it would have been around Ä 500 a year)
2: practical because the public line is old and often stops and it is not allowed to pour rainwater from the gutters into it
But not everyone is allowed to do it, I can because I am a certified farm and I can be self-sufficient as long as the purifier is active and it is.
I mean, I have two passive septic tanks, a static degreaser for kitchens (I have three) and a purifier with agitation and oxygenation system for sewage liquids ... what comes out is poured into the channel in front of my house and has no bad smell and is transparent.

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Fri Apr 30, 2021 6:16 am quote
Thanks Everyone for the Great Photos
I already posted wood frame house, Brick Front, Hardwood Oak Floors, Sheet Rock inside walls. Typical Minnesota construction - except everyone has went modern inside. Mine below is the old dark wood cabinets.

Robert Copeland



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Molto Verboso
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Fri Apr 30, 2021 3:19 pm quote
Now if someone can find a way to utilize all the plastic scrap to feed those printers we could be on the way to solve more than just one problem!
Molto Verboso
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Sat May 01, 2021 6:39 pm quote
Attila, the floor tiles in my new home are all oven-fired clay tiles about 20mm thick. They form a wonderful heat sink to absorb heat from the sun during the day and release it again in the night.
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Sat May 01, 2021 9:25 pm quote
Fudmucker wrote:
Attila, the floor tiles in my new home are all oven-fired clay tiles about 20mm thick. They form a wonderful heat sink to absorb heat from the sun during the day and release it again in the night.
Yes, the same thing happens to me with my floor tiles. Consider that they rest on a reinforced concrete surface in which the pipes that carry hot water to the radiators are drowned. The stove is a 32,000 kcal pellets


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Sun May 02, 2021 8:56 pm quote
I just don't understand how you can build houses out of masonry that will hold up when you have earthquakes. New masonry construction is very rare in Northern California because of earthquake concerns, and old buildings like City Halls have been lifted a bit and isolated on a spring suspension base so they can float when the earth moves. The city office building here in Oakland is now surrounded by a dry moat, covered with steel plates, so it can move at least a meter in any horizontal direction.
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Sun May 02, 2021 9:36 pm quote
People build with timber that will not withstand a hurricane.
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Mon May 03, 2021 1:16 am quote
Der Blechfahrer wrote:
People build with timber that will not withstand a hurricane.
I tell you the contradictions of Italy for which we are famous (infamous) in the world.
In my area in 1960 they built a nuclear power plant because it was considered a non-seismic area; from the year 2000 it became a seismic zone of maximum degree with the obligation of geological report and anti-seismic construction systems of the highest level.
They forced me to build a house (one storey) of 180 square meters with 24 25 cm reinforced concrete pillars. x 50 cm.
Molto Verboso
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Mon May 03, 2021 3:09 am quote
Attila wrote:
In my area in 1960 they built a nuclear power plant because it was considered a non-seismic area; from the year 2000 it became a seismic zone of maximum degree with the obligation of geological report and anti-seismic construction systems of the highest level.
They forced me to build a house (one storey) of 180 square meters with 24 25 cm reinforced concrete pillars. x 50 cm.
They can always move the nuclear power plant to your place.
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Mon May 03, 2021 3:16 am quote
Sledge wrote:
Attila wrote:
In my area in 1960 they built a nuclear power plant because it was considered a non-seismic area; from the year 2000 it became a seismic zone of maximum degree with the obligation of geological report and anti-seismic construction systems of the highest level.
They forced me to build a house (one storey) of 180 square meters with 24 25 cm reinforced concrete pillars. x 50 cm.
They can always move the nuclear power plant to your place.
It's 7 kilometers away, I think it's pretty close ...
However in Italy we closed them all after Chernobyl, we held a referendum and we declared them dangerous. End.
Part of the electricity is bought by the neighbors who produce it (with nuclear power plants) and part is produced with alternative energy sources, mainly photovoltaic.
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Mon May 03, 2021 3:21 am quote
Sledge wrote:
Attila wrote:
In my area in 1960 they built a nuclear power plant because it was considered a non-seismic area; from the year 2000 it became a seismic zone of maximum degree with the obligation of geological report and anti-seismic construction systems of the highest level.
They forced me to build a house (one storey) of 180 square meters with 24 25 cm reinforced concrete pillars. x 50 cm.
They can always move the nuclear power plant to your place.
Those solar panels on Attilas roof should see a boost.
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Mon May 03, 2021 3:28 am quote
znomit wrote:
Sledge wrote:
Attila wrote:
In my area in 1960 they built a nuclear power plant because it was considered a non-seismic area; from the year 2000 it became a seismic zone of maximum degree with the obligation of geological report and anti-seismic construction systems of the highest level.
They forced me to build a house (one storey) of 180 square meters with 24 25 cm reinforced concrete pillars. x 50 cm.
They can always move the nuclear power plant to your place.
Those solar panels on Attilas roof should see a boost.
5 Kw.
Molto Verboso
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Wed May 05, 2021 7:47 pm quote
wentwest wrote:
I just don't understand how you can build houses out of masonry that will hold up when you have earthquakes. New masonry construction is very rare in Northern California because of earthquake concerns, and old buildings like City Halls have been lifted a bit and isolated on a spring suspension base so they can float when the earth moves. The city office building here in Oakland is now surrounded by a dry moat, covered with steel plates, so it can move at least a meter in any horizontal direction.
I scratched my head trying to understand this post. Is there a "not" missing in the first sentence?
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Wed May 05, 2021 11:23 pm quote
It depends on how strong the earthquake is ...
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Thu May 06, 2021 7:41 am quote
Fudmucker wrote:
I scratched my head trying to understand this post. Is there a "not" missing in the first sentence?
No?
Molto Verboso
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Thu May 06, 2021 8:06 am quote
wentwest wrote:
I just don't understand how you can build houses out of masonry that will hold up when you have earthquakes.
Either:
I just don't understand how you can not build houses out of masonry that will hold up when you have earthquakes.
or:
I just don't understand how you can build houses out of masonry that will not hold up when you have earthquakes.

Either the masonry houses are wise to build in an earthquake zone, or they are unwise to build.
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Thu May 06, 2021 9:23 am quote
Fudmucker wrote:
Either the masonry houses are wise to build in an earthquake zone, or they are unwise to build.
Unreinforced masonry structures do not survive earthquakes.
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Thu May 06, 2021 10:47 am quote
Fudmucker wrote:
Either:
I just don't understand how you can build houses out of masonry that will hold up when you have earthquakes.
or:
I just don't understand how you can build houses out of masonry that will not hold up when you have earthquakes.
As you have introduced double negatives, the above parses as:
Quote:
[1]I just don't understand how you can not build houses out of masonry that will hold up when you have earthquakes.
[2]I just don't understand how you can build houses out of masonry that will not hold up when you have earthquakes.
Both of which now become:
I understand how you can build houses out of masonry that will hold up when you have earthquakes. 
Which is the complete opposite of what was written, and meant.
Quote:
Either the masonry houses are wise to build in an earthquake zone, or they are unwise to build.
The latter, as opined.
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