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Vespa gts 300 hpe racing sixties
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Vespa gts 300 hpe racing sixties
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Hello to everyone,

I'm a new member and i have a question.

I bought a new Vespa Gts 300HPE Racing Sixties and i want to upgrade the suspensions (front & rear) because the factory suspensions is to hard. I feeling them like as a "wood". I'm between Zelioni and Bitubo but i don't know which is better suspension.

I would appreciate ιf someone knows which is better choise.

Kind Regards
Dimitris Paganis
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I love my Bitubos but have no experience with Zelioni. Zelioni stuff is beautiful but expensive.
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Welcome from Latina, central Italy.
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2019 GTS300 Supertech E3 59,000km
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Welcome, We're glad you found MV!

I hear the SIP stuff is good, but I don't have any first-hand experience.
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Do you want pretty or do you want performance?
Either of them should ride stiffer than the stock "rubber pig" shocks.
The more you ride it, the sooner the stock shocks will start to soften up.
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Dimitris Paganis wrote:
the factory suspensions is to hard. I feeling them like as a "wood"
I just reread you post ...

as Motovista says most people find factory suspension soft. other brands like bitubo and zeloini / sip are harder.

stay with you factory shocks for another couple of thousand kms and think again
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steelbytes wrote:
stay with you factory shocks for another couple of thousand kms and think again
I disagree. One of the first things I do to any new Vespa is replace the front shock. It makes a big difference to ride and handling.
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Mike Holland wrote:
I disagree. One of the first things I do to any new Vespa is replace the front shock. It makes a big difference to ride and handling.
Did you note the the original question was complaining that the factory shocks are too hard? (I missed this on first read)

But me personally; I find the factory shocks to soft...
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Dimitris Paganis wrote:
the factory suspensions is to hard. I feeling them like as a "wood".
Curious, is it the front on the rear that you find too hard? (Or both)
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steelbytes wrote:
Did you note the the original question was complaining that the factory shocks are too hard?
Aftermarket shocks can be adjusted for both hard/soft and rebound, so you can set them to suit your own style of riding - hard of you like cornering on good roads, soft if your local roads are rough.
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Mike Holland wrote:
Aftermarket shocks can be adjusted for both hard/soft and rebound, so you can set them to suit your own style of riding - hard of you like cornering on good roads, soft if your local roads are rough.
Yes I'm aware of that

But I'm doubtful that you can set bitubos softer than 'broken in' standard oem shocks. Hence wouldn't help the original posters issue

PS I'm pretty sure bitubo don't have rebound adjustment. Front is compression + preload and rear is preload only. Or have they eventually updated their range? My SIP do include rebound front and rear which is part of the reason i choose then instead of bitubos
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on my partner's Tomato we've installed at front BGV (BVG?) one which we got almost new as donor from poor old Mrs Sophie. The rear ones were in dire condition and needed replacement as well, Daahling got Zelionis.

that old GTS is running 10x better on the road than mine 2017 Froggy, suspension-wise.

I have almost 12.000 km on Froggy, so the OEM suspension feels as if there is any present. I ma not the smallest guy but am still far, far away from the load limit that Piaggio is prescribing.

I see in my near future (start of next season) change both front and rear end suspension.

based on Daahling's experience (I drove a lot his Tomato, so I can compare directly) I will go for this combination: BGV/BVG front and Zelioni/SIP rear.
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Mike Holland wrote:
I disagree. One of the first things I do to any new Vespa is replace the front shock. It makes a big difference to ride and handling.
+1 on this..

The Vespa OEM shocks seems to be designed for the Roman's road (cobble) and the front is simply non existent.. If you enjoy cornering at a decent speed and being able to brake without bottoming out every time, the front shock replacement is a must...
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
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To be precise, the Vespa OEM shock absorbers are calibrated for an average need but ...
Almost all new scooters are stiffer, the springs have to "tighten (loosen)" with use and you may or may not like it, in which case you change the shock absorbers.
On the Vespa many of my friend's dealership customers change the front one almost immediately, but only to have greater braking stability; the rear shock absorber is changed if you frequently carry the passenger, if you are particularly heavy or if you also frequently carry heavy loads.
I keep reminding you that the maximum weights allowed and not to be exceeded are indicated in the use and maintenance booklet.
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Burt37 wrote:
+1 on this..

The Vespa OEM shocks seems to be designed for the Roman's road (cobble) and the front is simply non existent.. If you enjoy cornering at a decent speed and being able to brake without bottoming out every time, the front shock replacement is a must...
I accidently ended up on the old Roman Road from Rome heading South. The cobbles are much larger than that and irregular shaped.
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rottekatz wrote:
I accidently ended up on the old Roman Road from Rome heading South. The cobbles are much larger than that and irregular shaped.
Those described by Burt are the "Sanpietrini" and are of the "pavement" type
The first "pavements" appear in the Roman tradition in a fairly modern age: invented in the sixteenth century to make the carriages slide better, since they are able to be smoothed by the friction of the wagons, they have taken the name of "cobblestones" or "sampietrini" because the the first were placed in St. Peter's Square.

There are different types of Roman flooring, the classical one (ancient Rome) is the "basolato":
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
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Mike Holland wrote:
I disagree. One of the first things I do to any new Vespa is replace the front shock. It makes a big difference to ride and handling.
Agreed, I replace both front and rear with Bitubos basically before the scoot even comes home with me. I just find it fits my riding style better and I feel more planted. I know I'm fortunate that the money isn't really a big deal to me at this level of spending and I also always put a performance exhaust on. The exhaust is at the end of the day mostly a cosmetic upgrade but the shocks really do make a difference. If budget is a concern or you just want the best bang for your buck then replacing the front shock is the way to go.

Give the stock shocks a chance. They aren't complete crap but some find them a little soft and I fit in that category. I ride pretty fast and hard on a Vespa so like that extra grip I feel with performance shocks. A well setup Vespa is truly a joy to ride.
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rottekatz wrote:
I accidently ended up on the old Roman Road from Rome heading South. The cobbles are much larger than that and irregular shaped.
No. I was referring to what we still use in Italy in most major historic centres towns to replace old worn out or broken cobble. You are describing a much, older road that we kept alive for the tourists. There are bits of those old roads everywhere in Europe, pretty much everywhere the Roman Empire managed to build a road 2000 years ago, as Attila does explained above...
Attila wrote:
To be precise, the Vespa OEM shock absorbers are calibrated for an average need but ...
Almost all new scooters are stiffer, the springs have to "tighten (loosen)" with use and you may or may not like it, in which case you change the shock absorbers.
On the Vespa many of my friend's dealership customers change the front one almost immediately, but only to have greater braking stability; the rear shock absorber is changed if you frequently carry the passenger, if you are particularly heavy or if you also frequently carry heavy loads.
I keep reminding you that the maximum weights allowed and not to be exceeded are indicated in the use and maintenance booklet.
Hard to be precise, when you use an average...

Every single Vespa I have been on, has always being, suspensions wise, the same...

Good enough to carry one passenger in the back and way too soft for an aggressive ride (sport) in the front...

As you know I'm from the larger built part of town, but this is irrelevant, as most motorcycles do exhibit those traits. Like you said, they give you a good starting point. Where you want to go from there is up to your will and skills... I like to ride my Vespa in a "happy" mode and either cornering and stopping, were simply not there with the OEM front shocks.

This is not to say that a person that weight 60-70 kg and that ride "conservatively" will ever have the needs to change the OEM shocks...

But no one can deny that aftermarket quality shocks that offer bound and rebound adjustments or a properly setup OEM shock for your style, always do improve your riding capabilities... I have no hesitation in also believing that a good quality shock setup properly, does increase your safety on the road as well, regardless of how you ride..
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Burt37 wrote:
....
This is not to say that a person that weight 60-70 kg and that ride "conservatively" will ever have the needs to change the OEM shocks...
...
those values are sounding more like Brad Pitt before and after Big Mac Razz emoticon

now seriously, those "standard" driver weights have to be updated, because both modern man and woman do not fit in the "standards" from mid 20th century.

me being almost 2 m tall and almost weighing 2 off "standard" persons does not help with the OEM suspension. Roman or Berliner roads, cobblestone roads are really p****** me off. and even for "standard" persons upgraded front and rear shocks make huge difference in ride quality.
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And you are right, the rear shock absorbers on my scooter are incredibly not adjustable. This is a big problem, I waited for the springs to unload to see if there was an improvement but nothing; so I will have to change them with others but adjustable.
If I had a Vespa before I would change the front due to the fact that it is single and improves the sinking, it would take a dedicated anti-dive system connected to the ABS.
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