Tue Sep 06, 2022 5:48 am

Lurker
2009 Piaggio MP3 250 ie
Joined: 15 Feb 2022
Posts: 2
Location: Dublin, CA
 
Lurker
2009 Piaggio MP3 250 ie
Joined: 15 Feb 2022
Posts: 2
Location: Dublin, CA
Tue Sep 06, 2022 5:48 am linkquote
Last year I noticed that my indicator lights, dash lights, and rear lights were not working.

When I opened up the fuse box located next to the right foot rest, I noticed that fuse # 12 (7.5 A, the most forward in the array) was melted (electrical short)? I bought a new fuse, but this didn't fix the problem. So, I replaced the fuse box. This still didn't solve the problem.

Out of frustration, I was turning the ignition key back and forth (between the OFF and ON positions) several times and came across a strange phenomenon:

If I turned the key from the OFF to the ON position in small increments, there was a specific point of the turn (before fully seating/clicking into the ON position) in which the dash/indicator/back lights turned on. If I then continued past that point to the final ON position, the dash/indicator/back lights would stop working.

This made me wonder if the issue was with the ignition switch. I took the ignition switch out and took it apart as much as I could and noticed some turquoise corrosion on the pins. I cleaned the pins and put the ignition switch back together—no success.

I thought I would replace the ignition switch but, when I saw how much it cost to buy a new switch, I decided to just live with the current one and deal with the strange partial key turning phenomenon.

I still don't know what could have caused fuse #12 to melt.

Does anyone have any thoughts on what could be causing this strange behavior?
Tue Sep 06, 2022 1:07 pm

Addicted
2015 MP3 500 ie Business
Joined: 29 Oct 2019
Posts: 869
Location: Belgium
 
Addicted
2015 MP3 500 ie Business
Joined: 29 Oct 2019
Posts: 869
Location: Belgium
Tue Sep 06, 2022 1:07 pm linkquote
Sounds like the ignition switch is likely suspect.

The fusebox melting is almost always caused by people putting in a higher amp rating than the circuit was designed for.

When a fuse blows, it blows for a reason. Putting in a higher amp fuse to eliminate the blow is the equivalent of putting a piece of electrical tape over the check engine light.
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