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@vintagescooterdude avatar
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2006 GT200 2009 Genuine Stella
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@vintagescooterdude avatar
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UTC quote
Does anybody have any experience riding a Vespa or Piaggio CVT scooter off road or on dirt roads for significant distances? I recently sold my small dual sport motorcycle, for a couple of reasons. First, the seat was simply too high for me to get on and off of without standing on something. It also had tube type tires, and I am no longer capable of repairing a flat with tube type tires by myself out in the middle of the AZ desert. We have a type of thorn here called "goatheads", which make flats with tube type tires a common thing. A flat tire 20+ miles from civilization, out in the middle of the desert would leave me completely stranded. I first considered a small cruiser style motorcycle for a low seat height, but they all have tube type tires. Modern scooters have tubeless tires, and a step through frame making it easy to get on and off the seat.

The ground clearance of a scooter would not be a problem, I would be riding very slowly, on fairly smooth ground. Slowly enough to be able to miss large rocks and holes. My concern with a scooter is the CVT. The AZ desert has a lot of sand and fine, powdery dust. Looking at the filter on the CVT, I don't see any way it would keep that kind of stuff out. You can see right through it, unlike the engine air filter, plus that is oiled. That dust can get through almost anything. I have found my turn signals and tail lights full of dust, and yet water doesn't get into them. Making a better filter, like the engine air filter, would probably restrict airflow and cause the CVT to overheat. I've never tried it, but it seems the dust and sand would grind up the belt, pulleys, and bearings in the CVT fairly quickly.

Having a CVT fail would also strand me. And that has happened before, fortunately on a paved road. A belt with only 4000 miles on it shredded on my Yamaha Vino 125. I still don't know why. But it happened on a summer day, with temperatures around 110-112 degrees, no shade, and very little water. I have a road service plan, but it took them three hours to show up. I was about to call someone to come and get me, and forget about the scooter. That was 10 years ago, I was in much better condition back then. I no longer ride in temperatures like that.
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UTC quote
Wow, it sounds like the desert would be tough on any vehicle!
Have you considered riding with a partner?
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2006 GT200 2009 Genuine Stella
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UTC quote
I have never in my whole life known anyone else who rode a motorcycle or scooter. During the past 46 years, I have ridden just over a million miles, all of them by myself. But things are different on the road. You can call for help, or in the age before cell phones, someone would eventually stop. Other than my road service plan, I don't have anyone to call. At least not from the middle of nowhere. I would have no way to tell them where I was anyway. Years ago, I was able to fix a tube type tire, and I could probably have walked out if my bike broke down in the middle of the desert. But that is no longer possible.

It's the sand and dust that are the real problem. A scooter with tubeless tires would handle everything else where I want to ride. My dual sport bike had a foam air filter, and starting out completely clean and oiled, by the end of the day it would have collected so much dirt that chunks of oily dirt that fell off the filter would have almost filled up the airbox.

Several people have told me that riding a CVT scooter off road shouldn't be a problem, but none of them have actually done it, not for any distance anyway. There are a number of videos showing scooters being ridden a few miles off road, I'm wondering how one would hold up after a few thousand miles.
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UTC quote
Have a look at the "scooter cannonball" event. Lots of videos on YouTube. Some years have had lots of gravel / dirt tracks.
@steelbytes avatar
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2019 GTS300 Supertech E3 60,000km
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Does offroad mean 'off the road' or does it mean an unsealed road (typically gravel)?

I ride lots of gravel and the rare bit of 4x4 tracks if they're in good condition. longest stretch of gravel in a single day was 180km plenty of which was not really suitable for 2wd

Many pics of the roads I ride at Country riding in Australia
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UTC quote
VintageScooterDude wrote:
I have never in my whole life known anyone else who rode a motorcycle or scooter. During the past 46 years, I have ridden just over a million miles, all of them by myself. But things are different on the road. You can call for help, or in the age before cell phones, someone would eventually stop. Other than my road service plan, I don't have anyone to call. At least not from the middle of nowhere. I would have no way to tell them where I was anyway. Years ago, I was able to fix a tube type tire, and I could probably have walked out if my bike broke down in the middle of the desert. But that is no longer possible.

It's the sand and dust that are the real problem. A scooter with tubeless tires would handle everything else where I want to ride. My dual sport bike had a foam air filter, and starting out completely clean and oiled, by the end of the day it would have collected so much dirt that chunks of oily dirt that fell off the filter would have almost filled up the airbox.

Several people have told me that riding a CVT scooter off road shouldn't be a problem, but none of them have actually done it, not for any distance anyway. There are a number of videos showing scooters being ridden a few miles off road, I'm wondering how one would hold up after a few thousand miles.
I have a buddy that lives in the Tempe\Mesa area. I have visited him several times and I will never understand how he withstands the heat. Its like the 9th level of hell in June\July. My next visit will be January.
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Molto Verboso
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Molto Verboso
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UTC quote
There is a Lady traveling with her GT 200 around the world: Juvena aka thewanderingwasp (also here on MV with same name)

https://www.facebook.com/thewanderingwasp

I have been following their adventures for some time. There are many routes that I would call "off road". Huge respect.
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GTS 300, Buddy 125
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GermanGTSDriver wrote:
There is a Lady traveling with her GT 200 around the world: Juvena aka thewanderingwasp (also here on MV with same name)

https://www.facebook.com/thewanderingwasp

I have been following their adventures for some time. There are many routes that I would call "off road". Huge respect.
Same with Queezies adventures on her GTS. Though her Vespa riding chronicled in her blog were in YS & Canada primarily.
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2006 GT200 2009 Genuine Stella
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UTC quote
SteelBytes wrote:
Does offroad mean 'off the road' or does it mean an unsealed road (typically gravel)?

I ride lots of gravel and the rare bit of 4x4 tracks if they're in good condition. longest stretch of gravel in a single day was 180km plenty of which was not really suitable for 2wd

Many pics of the roads I ride at Country riding in Australia
It means dirt roads and smooth dirt trails, but not gravel. I mean, there is some gravel, but mostly fine dirt, sand, and dust. When you see a vehicle being driven/ridden on these roads from a distance, pretty much all you see is a cloud of dust, rather than the vehicle itself, and they leave a long cloud of dust in the air behind them. I would be going pretty slow, much slower than on a real dirt/dual sport bike, but there would still be plenty of dust. There's just no way around it, it's what southern AZ is made of.

Just looked at your pictures. The roads/trails I'm talking about are considerably dustier than that. There are no trees here, just cactus and mesquite brush. Kind of like this. I didn't ride more than a few feet on this, there is pavement behind me.
AZ desert road
AZ desert road
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UTC quote
Donttellmywife wrote:
I have a buddy that lives in the Tempe\Mesa area. I have visited him several times and I will never understand how he withstands the heat. Its like the 9th level of hell in June\July. My next visit will be January.
I live one mile from the Mesa city limits. Nobody who has not experienced the extreme heat here will understand it. The only place in the country hotter than the Phoenix Valley is Death Valley, CA, and they call it that for a reason. Many people die here every year from the heat. One year more than 20 years ago it hit 122 degrees, and they shut down the airport. January is beautiful. Weatherwise anyway.
@anything_outdoors avatar
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UTC quote
What about a Honda CT125?

And a Garmin inreach for peace of mind.

Ahh scrap that it's got tubed tyres.

Just found the new Honda Cub (C125) has tubeless but
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2019 GTS300 Supertech E3 60,000km
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UTC quote
VintageScooterDude wrote:
It means dirt roads and smooth dirt trails, but not gravel. I mean, there is some gravel, but mostly fine dirt, sand, and dust. When you see a vehicle being driven/ridden on these roads from a distance, pretty much all you see is a cloud of dust, rather than the vehicle itself, and they leave a long cloud of dust in the air behind them. I would be going pretty slow, much slower than on a real dirt/dual sport bike, but there would still be plenty of dust. There's just no way around it, it's what southern AZ is made of.

Just looked at your pictures. The roads/trails I'm talking about are considerably dustier than that. There are no trees here, just cactus and mesquite brush. Kind of like this. I didn't ride more than a few feet on this, there is pavement behind me.
I call that fine gravel, not offroad. Anyway I understand what you're asking, plenty of dust on Aussie country roads too

yeah dust is something that'll you will need to pay attention to both for clogging and abrasion. When I get home I ...

* use a small leaf blower / shop blower to thoroughly blow out the engine bay and the radiators.
* look into the transmission air intake and judge if that foam is bad and if so remove that black piece of cvt cover and wash the filter and while the cover is off blow in there as well.
* stick the nozzle of the blower up through the square hole under the rear of the cvt (you may not be familiar with this - lay on the ground and have a look
* if it's been a little damp then the dust will really build up in the brakes and munches through the discs quicker than normal - give a quick wash. my front was under spec at 35,000km.
* engine air intake filter - mine is different to yours, it's the paper style not foam and also the inlet is under the seat hinge not down low at the front of the box like the classic gts. Yours is gonna probably suck a lot of dust due to the position of that inlet and you're gonna have to wash and oil the filter and clean the inside of that box a lot and it becomes very sludgy due to oil from the breather.

I also don't wait for the nominated 10,000km service intervals before opening the cvt for an inspection and cleaning. I do seem to flat spot the cvt rollers quicker than many people - multiple times at less than 10,000km. I also worn out my clutch by 30,000km. This could be due to the dust. Bearings can also wear out quicker, eg the one in the transmission cover and in the swingarm - I've had to replace both at less than 40,000km.

If anyone else eg in Australia has the paper style with inlet at the seat hinge and rides in enough dusty envireoments I suggest sealing around that with some foam as this greatly reduces the dust that gets in. Ask me for pics - maybe a different thread.

(compressed air is probably better for some of this cleaning but I don't have it)

This video is not as dusty as you're talking about but dusty enough for this topic. I'm normally in the mountains not the open plains but I do those now and then to reach more mountains
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@steelbytes avatar
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(continued from above)

plus stone chips on the underside and behind the front wheel will be plentiful. might want to get one of the extensions for the front fender/guard https://slukshop.uk/product/vespa-gts-sluk-guard-hpe-ultra/

and of course suitable suspension for the washboard corrugations and potholes

another mod Meccano to the rescue (rear guard rubbing)
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2006 GT200 2009 Genuine Stella
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UTC quote
Ok, thanks. It looks like a CVT scooter would not be suitable for the type of use I had in mind. I was talking about actually going out into the desert and riding several hours in the dirt for recreational purposes on a regular basis, not just riding a short distance on a dirt road to get somewhere else.

I seriously considered the new Super Cub 125. They turn up used on my local Craigslist ever once in a while. I thought that removing the leg shield and chain case would make it fairly off road/dirt road capable. I mean, look what Ed March has done with C90s. And it does have tubeless tires. And no, being computerized really wouldn't be much of an issue, considering what I wanted to use it for. It could make the difference between continuing to ride off road and not being able to ride off road anymore. But there is STILL a problem with it. I don't fit. Unlike the original Super Cub, which had a full length seat, and the early '80s Passport C70 (I owned an '83 back in the early '90s) which also had a full length seat, the new one has only a tiny little seat that is way too far forward. I already tried a CT90, which has the same seating position, and was so scrunched up I could barely ride it. I have a 34" inseam, and my knees almost hit the bars. A full length seat would solve that problem, but there doesn't seem to be one available. Also, I weigh 240, and I think the load capacity on the new Super Cub 125 is under that. Combine that with dirt roads and trails being somewhat bumpy, and even going slow things would probably start to break fairly soon. Ed March is probably half my weight.
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I had one of these, Suzuki VanVan 200.

It is very low and light, easy to mount and handle.

Very powerless too - won't scrape the rear wheel, that's quaranteed...

The seat is comfy, much confier than in the more popular Yamaha TW.

This said, the knee angle might be on the tight side. There is room to move on the seat though.

Air cooled, but with a separate oil cooler.

Engines are made by Suzuki in Japan (yes, really), the quality is super. Same goes with welding and everything, these things seldom break down.

The engine sounds like a sewing machine, luckily a quiet one.

The balloon tyres won't break easily because of sharp rocks and such....but I don't know about those plants you mentioned. It does have tubes. Yamaha TWs used to be popular e.g. in our Lappland, where reindeer herds rode with them through rocky and tough, isolated areas.

The balloon tyres work greatly in any soft/uneven surface, making the bike very easy and stable to ride within any sensible speeds....and as said, it is not really even capable for unsensible ones

Other than tubeless tyres, I'd say this could be a nice match.
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You can get a long seat for the Super Cub, try Webike based out of Japan. That and a set of semi-knobby tire and you would be good to go. As long as you don't go too hard and bend a mag wheel, I bet it would work out fine.
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Molto Verboso
S150 '09, Beo 500ie '08
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Isn't there already a hose on the front of the CVT so the air coming into it, agitated by the variator vanes, is drawn from an area well ahead of, and above, the dusty rear wheel?

Another path might be to add a small electric blower and filter to push clean air through that hose into the CVT, creating slight positive pressure so the dust doesn't get in there in the first place.
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Molto Verboso
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This looks like a job for Steve Williams. See his Scooter in the Sticks videos on YouTube.

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2006 GT200 2009 Genuine Stella
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UTC quote
Unfortunately tube type tires won't work. Here's why.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=goatheads&id=BCAB33A2DD3E5F39ADF5765A35C721A8BBDC1761&form=IQFRBA&first=1

Those are called "goatheads" and they will quickly puncture a tube type tire, because the tube is so thin. The AZ desert is covered with trillions of them. A tubeless tire with Ride-On sealant in it is immune to these things. You could have a thousand punctures from something like that, and they would still hold air. They may go through the tire, but even without the sealant it would lose air so slowly that you would be able to get back to civilization just by reinflating the tire when you noticed it was low. Sealant doesn't work in tubes because they are too thin to provide any sealing surface. I have found objects (nails and screws, etc.) stuck in tubeless tires while inspecting the tires at home that actually punctured the tire, then sealed the puncture. They could have been in there for hundreds of miles. With tube type tires something like that would have shredded the tube.

I have seen scooters with what looked like a duct connected to the CVT filter cover. My GT200 sucks in air right at the cover. For a scooter I was thinking of something like an LX150 or maybe a Liberty 150.

I'll check on a seat for a Super Cub.
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Oh, I got the requirement for tubeless now.

Then there is of course the Monkey, which ain't as small as they used to be. It too have tubeless tyres.

Funnily enough, when looking for a vid of the latest Monkey, this came up:

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UTC quote
I just returned a Vespa GTS to my friend Gregg.

He lives near Asheville in North Carolina, and lives just north of three miles of a dirt and gravel road.

It is a beautiful road, twisting and turning as it climbs nearly 1000 feet to his property.

I rode my daughter-in-law's Grom up there a week and a half ago, then Gregg's Vespa up again today and the Grom back down.

It was ok on both but, while I like the Vespa better for almost any riding, the Grom felt better on this road.

Bill
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What a difference ten days means in the mountains in spring.
What a difference ten days means in the mountains in spring.
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whatever you choose you'll probably want to learn how to do a lot of the servicing yourself. same applies for riding motorcross / dirt / enduro / etc bikes in 'true off road conditions'. many of these are supposed to have the oil changed very very frequently etc. any abuse of a bike requires extra maintenance
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UTC quote
That won't be a problem, if done at home. I was an auto/truck/heavy equipment mechanic my whole life. I have always repaired and maintained my own vehicles. I was a drag racer for decades, and built several race cars. There are a couple of issues that will make it more difficult. I have physical disabilities that can make it difficult and sometimes impossible to do certain things. The reasons I had to give up the bike I'm trying to find a replacement for are twofold. One, the seat was so high I could no longer get my leg over it while standing on the ground. The other was that I could no longer fix a flat tube type tire by myself out in the desert. I can no longer get down on my knees for any length of time. I can still replace a tire at home, though it takes a lot longer than it used to. I spent over a week doing the 12,000 mile service and replacing both tires on my GT200. I had to do it a little bit at the time. But it still got done.

Another issue is that if I get something with computerized electronics, I no longer have access to the complex and expensive diagnostic equipment and vehicle specific software I had at work.

I may have actually found a bike that will work. I was looking at small displacement cruiser style street bikes, but they all had tube type tires. But I missed one. The Honda Rebel 300. To me it is the ugliest abomination I've ever seen. But for an off road bike that won't really be a problem. It has a really low seat, tubeless tires, a place to put storage bags, both saddle bags and a rack bag, and a place called T-Rex Racing even makes a bash plate for it to protect the engine. Honda started making these things in 2017, they were mostly bought by beginners, and they show up for sale used ever once in a while. I'm going to go to a dealer and sit on one to see how it feels, and if I like it (except it's looks) then I'll keep my eye out for a used one. Wouldn't even matter if it had been dropped if the damage was only cosmetic, or easily repairable.
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UTC quote
Much wringing of hands for naught.
You're not riding through 1936 Oklahoma.
The fewer paved roads in a country, the more scooters you will see. Read the part of your owners manual about dusty conditions.
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Weird 80's Vespas & Cool Vintage Lambrettas
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UTC quote
Motovista wrote:
Much wringing of hands for naught.
You're not riding through 1936 Oklahoma.
The fewer paved roads in a country, the more scooters you will see. Read the part of your owners manual about dusty conditions.
my thoughts exactly, especially with so many SxS, UTV and quads being CVT now.

ET/LX have the air intake up under the seat and the transmission intake is a long tube tucked up into the frame, both of those are well shielded from dust.
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greasy125 wrote:
my thoughts exactly, especially with so many SxS, UTV and quads being CVT now.
And so do battle tanks such as the Japanese Type 10. Although I don't know that they are the same design as Piaggio uses 🤣
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UTC quote
VintageScooterDude wrote:
That won't be a problem, if done at home. I was an auto/truck/heavy equipment mechanic my whole life. I have always repaired and maintained my own vehicles. I was a drag racer for decades, and built several race cars. There are a couple of issues that will make it more difficult. I have physical disabilities that can make it difficult and sometimes impossible to do certain things. The reasons I had to give up the bike I'm trying to find a replacement for are twofold. One, the seat was so high I could no longer get my leg over it while standing on the ground. The other was that I could no longer fix a flat tube type tire by myself out in the desert. I can no longer get down on my knees for any length of time. I can still replace a tire at home, though it takes a lot longer than it used to. I spent over a week doing the 12,000 mile service and replacing both tires on my GT200. I had to do it a little bit at the time. But it still got done.

Another issue is that if I get something with computerized electronics, I no longer have access to the complex and expensive diagnostic equipment and vehicle specific software I had at work.

I may have actually found a bike that will work. I was looking at small displacement cruiser style street bikes, but they all had tube type tires. But I missed one. The Honda Rebel 300. To me it is the ugliest abomination I've ever seen. But for an off road bike that won't really be a problem. It has a really low seat, tubeless tires, a place to put storage bags, both saddle bags and a rack bag, and a place called T-Rex Racing even makes a bash plate for it to protect the engine. Honda started making these things in 2017, they were mostly bought by beginners, and they show up for sale used ever once in a while. I'm going to go to a dealer and sit on one to see how it feels, and if I like it (except it's looks) then I'll keep my eye out for a used one. Wouldn't even matter if it had been dropped if the damage was only cosmetic, or easily repairable.
Would not have thought about Rebel 300, but it does make sense.
Will be interesting to hear what your thoughts are after having sat on one.

The last summer I met a 50+ years old guy, who bought Rebel 300 as his first ever bike. He thought that he would get a bigger one after a while, but he has grown to like the handy Rebel so much, that it's a keeper
@motovista avatar
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Scooters do surprisingly well on dirt roads, all things considered, because so much of the weight is on the rear wheel. One of the things you learn when riding in dirt is to get the weight back off the front wheel. A Rebel 300 might seem like a good choice for the reasons cited, but when things get squirrely, I don't see how you could quickly get the weight off the front wheel.
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2019 GTS300 Supertech E3 60,000km
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@steelbytes avatar
2019 GTS300 Supertech E3 60,000km
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UTC quote
Motovista's comment reminds me of something that is a bit of a pain with the GTS ...

Short suspension travel at the front. I have to set the compression + preload a bit firmer than you'd expect so that I don't bottom out when hitting bumps or holes too fast. Bottoming out too often is how I think I killed my steering bearings.

I suspect most motorcycles have longer travel

Edit: measured original oem shocks from my hpe as they were sitting in a box next to me Exposed shaft is front 5.3cm rear 6.5cm. Shaft thickness is front 13mm rear 10mm. My sip shocks have 14mm shafts but can't easily check travel length but suspect similar to oem
@25bikez avatar
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Molto Verboso
2022 Liberty 150S-"Meg"-SOLD
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Molto Verboso
@25bikez avatar
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Did I miss where you ruled out the Stella?

No CVT, and easily replaceable wheels with a spare tire onboard. That would seem to be an option you already own.

And, the design and engineering come from a place with a lot of poor roads.
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25BIKEZ wrote:
And, the design and engineering come from a place with a lot of poor roads.
And people who can fix them for next to nothing on every street corner. There is no way I would trust a Stella offroad miles from civilization.

As Greasy125 reminded us, pretty much every ATV not made by Honda has a CVT transmission. They do fine in the dirt, mud, sand, gravel, etc.
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Molto Verboso
2022 Liberty 150S-"Meg"-SOLD
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@25bikez avatar
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UTC quote
Motovista wrote:
And people who can fix them for next to nothing on every street corner. There is no way I would trust a Stella offroad miles from civilization.
Maybe that's because Stellas are easily fixable by someone with rudimentary skills?

Me? I've owned a couple. Yeah, they're not super slick, but there's not much to go wrong with them.

I was asking the OP if he had considered the Stella. He knows his ride better than we do.
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25BIKEZ wrote:
Maybe that's because Stellas are easily fixable by someone with rudimentary skills?

Me? I've owned a couple. Yeah, they're not super slick, but there's not much to go wrong with them.

I was asking the OP if he had considered the Stella. He knows his ride better than we do.
Given how there's not much to go wrong with Stellas, it seems like there should be more of them still on the road. I got my first one when the original purchaser decided to give up riding because the exhaust melted his rear tire and he crashed. And the replacement engine I bought, after the original engine seized at speed, was from one that had been totaled. The person I gave my Stella to, because I couldn't bring myself to make someone actually pay for it, wrecked it a final time.
I got the second one when someone walked into the shop, put the keys on the desk and said, "It's all yours." I had never met or spoken to this person before or since. I parked it in a high crime area and nobody stole it.

I can't imagine a more enjoyable place to spend my final moments than in the middle of the desert, trying to get a Stella running again.

This is probably the most accurate Stella ad I've seen:
[chippewa falls, wi] 2008 stella of death
OP
@vintagescooterdude avatar
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Hooked
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I did not consider the Stella because I do not want to destroy it. I bought it new, and have taken care of it. 150cc 2 stroke manual shift scooters don't exactly grow on trees. Anything used in the AZ desert is going to get badly beat up. A 2010 LX150 just showed up on Craigslist. I might look at that. It should work if the air intake going into the CVT is fairly well protected from dust. I will be riding slowly, but even a bike going 5 mph will stir up quite a dust trail.
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If you are concerned about getting where you are going, and returning, something like a Yamaha Zuma or one of the Honda 150 scooters would be a better fit. The 2019 and older Zuma is air cooled, so you won't have to worry about a hunter punching a hole in the radiator with an arrow. But it is fuel injected, and riding through the desert wouldn't be much fun if you are constantly thinking about EMF rays from a nuclear attack or 5G towers. Your best bets are probably the Taiwanese brands like Kymco or PGO. There aren't that many 150cc scooters out there that don't have liquid cooling or fuel injection and are worth owning. Most of the cheaper Kymco models are made in China, and if you got stranded and had to eat one, the paint might be toxic. That's not something you should have to worry about either. The PGO Genuine Buddy has a very low seat, and is small and light. It is made in Taiwan. It has an oil cooler and real filter and you can get front and rear racks for it. Both of these companies make ATVs that use the same motors and CVT transmissions.
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Motovista wrote:
The 2019 and older Zuma is air cooled, so you won't have to worry about some freak accident where a hunter punches a hole in the radiator with an arrow.
You want water cooled so you can drink the coolant. It will help preserve your corpse and keep the coyotes away.
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while the buddy 150/170 does have an oil cooler, which is a nice addition, and it does have a "skid plate".... that cinnamon beach hangs loooowww, same with the bat-tree. both of which I would absolutely NOT want to be where they are when riding off road.

here I think the buddy 125 has the edge. I'd still prefer an ET or LX. however, if you were really going for it, I'd say a Kymco people 150 would be the best all around followed by the agility 125 (the early mainland china ones with the head lights that went out all the time).

you couldn't pay me enough to ride a Stella someplace further than what would be a reasonable walk to reach AC and a cold beer.
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I've ridden my GTS on several long packed dirt/gravel stretches. It takes a bit of practice to become competent. I've done a couple of water crossings about 6" deep. I didn't have any issues with the CVT.

With the small wheels of a Vespa, you end up with about 8 inches of ground clearance; I would avoid trails with large rocks. I would also avoid deep loose sand for the same reason. Tackling mud is going to come down to tires I think.

After doing any off-roading on a Vespa, I would highly recommend cleaning/changing air filters and the interior of the transmission case.
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
Forum member supplied image with no explanatory text
SLUK front guard helps a bit as well.
SLUK front guard helps a bit as well.
UTC

Hooked
2007gts250ie
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I have desired a Vespa since a teenager, life got in the way of that desire for many many years. I have been enjoying bringing my 250gts up to my safety standards. I recently was able to take a + hundred mile drive to enjoy a bit of the blue ridge parkway. Although my scoot can traverse off road conditions, I would seek a vehicle that was designed for off road conditions before exposing my scoot or my safety to go off road more then one hundred yards or so. I love my Vespa but understand it is not the best for all types of Riding.
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Hooked
'20 GTS300 Touring, '10 GTS300 Super (sold)
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UTC quote
VintageScooterDude wrote:
I live one mile from the Mesa city limits. Nobody who has not experienced the extreme heat here will understand it. The only place in the country hotter than the Phoenix Valley is Death Valley, CA, and they call it that for a reason. Many people die here every year from the heat. One year more than 20 years ago it hit 122 degrees, and they shut down the airport. January is beautiful. Weatherwise anyway.
I lived in Chandler for seven years and rode to work in Tempe. When I moved to AZ from CO in February, a met a guy who rode a BMW GS as did I. We were riding on lovely day when he told me "The day will come when the temps drop into the 90's and you think it is cooling off!" So true! I used to fill the pockets of my riding jacket with ice before leaving work in the afternoon. It would melt quickly but the water offered some evap cooling for my 20 minute ride.
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