OP
UTC

Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
 
Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
UTC quote
I live in rural eastern Washington State, USA. I'm shopping for my first Vespa, which will also be my first scooter. I rode a Honda 100cc dual sport for a few years, around 10 years ago. My focus is commuting and exploring.
I'm looking at the GT200 and ET4 150.
I'm leaning heavily to the GT200. The only things I don't like, so far are no kick starter and about 100 pounds heavier than the ET4 150.
Are there differences in:
charging, how many watts are available for accessories?
heat in leg cover from the cooling system?
@syd avatar
UTC

Ossessionato
GTS300 Super (Heinz) GTS250 Super (Bulger)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 4791
Location: Tempe, AZ
 
Ossessionato
@syd avatar
GTS300 Super (Heinz) GTS250 Super (Bulger)
Joined: UTC
Posts: 4791
Location: Tempe, AZ
UTC quote
Welcome to Modern Vespa Road Less Traveled. Neither the ET4 or the GT200 are in production, so keep checking Craigslist. The GT200 is 'possibly' the best scoot Piaggio ever made, but parts are in short supply. Could I talk you into a GTS 250? Newer, slightly more ccs, better parts availability.
@scooter_curmudgeon avatar
UTC

Hooked
GT200/GTS300/Primavera 150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 108
Location: Olympia, WA (US)
 
Hooked
@scooter_curmudgeon avatar
GT200/GTS300/Primavera 150
Joined: UTC
Posts: 108
Location: Olympia, WA (US)
UTC quote
Hello, and welcome. I have a GT200, 2006 edition, and it is a superb scooter. It being of a (ahem) certain age, parts can sometimes be challenge to procure but when everything is sound and working well, there is much to like. I can also vouch for the quality of the GT250, itself an excellent scooter.

Compared to the Primavera 150, the GT definitely feels less "flickable", but a lot of my riding is on rural roads with 50 mph speed limits, where the GT is very well suited.

I have not found heat from the cooling system to be excessive, but then I'm typically not riding in the temperatures that you will find in the summer. I have a USB charging port that I'm waiting to install, so can't yet comment on capacity, but there are some seriously geeky folks here who can do/have done the math and can tell you what you have available for charging.

If you have reasonably good mechanical skills, you should be able to cover most of the regular maintenance and minor repair items needed to keep it running well. This forum is an excellent resource for when you reach the end of those skills and need an assist. Having access to a shop or an independent mechanic familiar with Vespa products is a plus when "phone a friend" won't do it.

Keep us posted on how your quest progresses, including photos, if you find something worthy.

Cheers,

Bob
@dvh1150 avatar
UTC

Hooked
2024 300 GTS "Classico" + 2001 ET2 50
Joined: UTC
Posts: 419
Location: Desert Hot Springs, CA
 
Hooked
@dvh1150 avatar
2024 300 GTS "Classico" + 2001 ET2 50
Joined: UTC
Posts: 419
Location: Desert Hot Springs, CA
UTC quote
Welcome to MV, Road!

I agree with Syd and the Curmudgeon -- start checking for 250s or 300s. I'm currently on my second 300 GTS, and I'm here to tell you she quite simply rocks in every scenario I've put her in. As for heat around the legshield, here in the SoCal desert, I don't even think about that. That's the LEAST of my heat worries! The scoot is pretty much always comfortable to ride. My experience with Vespas is that they hold up quite, quite well. Sorta the "you take care of them and they'll take care of you" thing. I'm not mechanical by any stretch, but I can make sure my two are safe to ride, and I have a good relationship with an independent mechanic who LOVES Vespas! He stops working on whatever Harley or Honda or Kawi he's knee-deep in when I ride up and need something.

And you'll get lots of good info here on MV. Just take most things I talk about with, say, a box of coarse Kosher salt!

Victor
@motovista avatar
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
GT 2.4
Joined: UTC
Posts: 9032
Location: Watts, Cherokee Nation
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
@motovista avatar
GT 2.4
Joined: UTC
Posts: 9032
Location: Watts, Cherokee Nation
UTC quote
Theroadlesstraveled wrote:
I'm leaning heavily to the GT200. The only things I don't like, so far are no kick starter and about 100 pounds heavier than the ET4 150.
Are there differences in:
charging, how many watts are available for accessories?
heat in leg cover from the cooling system?
You could likely install a kick starter on the GT200, and unless you're planning to carry it, you shouldn't notice the difference in weight. As far as the electrical system, it is going to be the same on the two bikes.
UTC

Veni, Vidi, Posti
Joined: UTC
Posts: 7091
Location: Tega Cay, SC
 
Veni, Vidi, Posti
Joined: UTC
Posts: 7091
Location: Tega Cay, SC
UTC quote
70 pounds difference and while that sounds like a lot, the GT is riding on 12 inch wheels, has a 4.5 longer wheelbase while the ET4 is on 10s. So even with more weight, the GT is not as nimble, or not as twitchy - depending on your point of view, but with the bigger wheels (and wheelbase), the GT carries the additional weight well. It really comes down to what you will be using the scoot for. The ET is a city bike first, but will do backroads alright. The GT can do all that and handle the highway too. It just won't be as flickable and is the cruiser of the two. Lastly, in all honesty, the kick start was not the best design. Just keep a good battery in either scoot, keep up with the maintenance and you'll be fine.
OP
UTC

Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
 
Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
UTC quote
Thanks for the welcome and replies, everybody!
OP
UTC

Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
 
Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
UTC quote
Syd wrote:
Welcome to Modern Vespa Road Less Traveled. Neither the ET4 or the GT200 are in production, so keep checking Craigslist. The GT200 is 'possibly' the best scoot Piaggio ever made, but parts are in short supply. Could I talk you into a GTS 250? Newer, slightly more ccs, better parts availability.
I'm looking at those two because I like them and they're available. The other huge factors are the weight, price and distance. I see a few GTS250s, and they look good, but cost thousands more dollars and are heavier. I wish the GT250 were lighter, I'm not sure I can handle anything heavier!
OP
UTC

Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
 
Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
UTC quote
Scooter Curmudgeon wrote:
… I have a GT200, 2006 edition, and it is a superb scooter. It being of a (ahem) certain age, parts can sometimes be challenge to procure
Ha ha! I can relate, I'm of a certain age and wearing out, too!
Scooter Curmudgeon wrote:
Compared to the Primavera 150, the GT definitely feels less "flickable", but a lot of my riding is on rural roads with 50 mph speed limits, where the GT is very well suited.
Yeah, I figured. I have to ride hilly highway posted 60 mph to get anywhere that I want to be. I must compromise to get the hill climbing power, speed and ability for me to handle the machine on/off road.
Scooter Curmudgeon wrote:
I have not found heat from the cooling system to be excessive, but then I'm typically not riding in the temperatures that you will find in the summer.
I should have been more clear, I meant heat for warming under a lap cover.
Scooter Curmudgeon wrote:
If you have reasonably good mechanical skills, you should be able to cover most of the regular maintenance and minor repair items needed to keep it running well. This forum is an excellent resource for when you reach the end of those skills and need an assist. Having access to a shop or an independent mechanic familiar with Vespa products is a plus when "phone a friend" won't do it.
I should be good skill wise. I definitely need to learn a lot of Vespa specific stuff and get a few specialty tools. Parts, manuals and the hive mind are my biggest concerns. The nearest dealer is a 4-6 hours drive, on the freeway. So far, I haven't found any Vespa shops any nearer.

Here's hoping all my quoting worked!
OP
UTC

Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
 
Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
UTC quote
DVH1150 wrote:
I agree with Syd and the Curmudgeon -- start checking for 250s or 300s.
They look good, but are thousands of dollars more and are heavier. I'm already concerned about the weight of the GT200.
DVH1150 wrote:
As for heat around the legshield, here in the SoCal desert, I don't even think about that. That's the LEAST of my heat worries! The scoot is pretty much always comfortable to ride.
I should have been more clear. I meant heat available to warm under a lap cover when it's cold.
DVH1150 wrote:
My experience with Vespas is that they hold up quite, quite well. Sorta the "you take care of them and they'll take care of you" thing. I'm not mechanical by any stretch, but I can make sure my two are safe to ride, and I have a good relationship with an independent mechanic who LOVES Vespas! He stops working on whatever Harley or Honda or Kawi he's knee-deep in when I ride up and need something.
I can do most of my own work AND I want to find a shop like that. It's a 4-6 hour drive on the freeway to the nearest dealer. I haven't found a Vespa shop that's closer, either.
OP
UTC

Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
 
Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
UTC quote
Motovista wrote:
You could likely install a kick starter on the GT200, and unless you're planning to carry it, you shouldn't notice the difference in weight.
I'm looking into a manual starting backup.

The weight is a concern for when I drop it or lay it down. Facepalm emoticon It won't be a pampered machine!
OP
UTC

Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
 
Member
Joined: UTC
Posts: 27
Location: Eastern Washington State, USA
UTC quote
Tierney wrote:
70 pounds difference and while that sounds like a lot, the GT is riding on 12 inch wheels, has a 4.5 longer wheelbase while the ET4 is on 10s. So even with more weight, the GT is not as nimble, or not as twitchy - depending on your point of view, but with the bigger wheels (and wheelbase), the GT carries the additional weight well.
I'm sure the weight is fine when things go well. I'm concerned about the weight when I drop it or lay it down. I'm a puny man!
Tierney wrote:
It really comes down to what you will be using the scoot for. The ET is a city bike first, but will do backroads alright. The GT can do all that and handle the highway too. It just won't be as flickable and is the cruiser of the two. Lastly, in all honesty, the kick start was not the best design. Just keep a good battery in either scoot, keep up with the maintenance and you'll be fine.
I want to ride on and off road, carry lots of stuff, be comfortable and use less gas than an SUV or truck.

I'm looking into manual starting options. At times, I'll be hours from help, with no means of communication and no expectation to see a human for hours to days. Having a manual option is important.
DoubleGood Design banner

Modern Vespa is the premier site for modern Vespa and Piaggio scooters. Vespa GTS300, GTS250, GTV, GT200, LX150, LXS, ET4, ET2, MP3, Fuoco, Elettrica and more.

Buy Me A Coffee
 

Shop on Amazon with Modern Vespa

Modern Vespa is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com


All Content Copyright 2005-2024 by Modern Vespa.
All Rights Reserved.


[ Time: 0.0137s ][ Queries: 3 (0.0020s) ][ live ][ 313 ][ ThingOne ]